HISTORY AND FIGURE → expression of passions

LINKED TERMS

157 terms
61 sources
403 quotations

2 quotations

Quotation

Nochtans noemtmen het aengezicht een spiegel des geests, en zijne grootheit moetmen in de weezentlijkheit kennen. En aldus moet een vernuftich Schilder, wanneer hy eenige Historie voorheeft, met een Poëtische uitvinding, de geest des persoons, dien hy wil verbeelden, in het wezen brengen, en hem iets geeven, daer hy aen te kennen zy: Als ontzachlijkheit aen Agamemnon, listicheit aen Ulisses, onvertzaegtheit aen Ajax, koenheit aen Diomedes, en toornicheit aen Achilles.

[d'après BLANC J., 2006, p.126 ]On dit bien, pourtant, que le visage est le miroir de l'esprit, et qu'il faut reconnaître la grandeur de celui-ci à l'apparence de celui-là. C'est ainsi d'ailleurs qu'un peintre ingénieux doit, quant il a l'intention de représenter quelque histoire, faire apparaître, grâce à son invention poétique, l'esprit du personnage qu'il souhaite figurer et lui donner quelque chose par quoi il puisse être reconnu: du respect pour Agamemnon, par exemple, de la ruse pour Ulysse, de l'intrépidité pour Ajax, de la hardiesse pour Diomède ou du courroux pour Achille.


Quotation

{Een goet Konterfeyter behoort ten minsten een figuer wel te konnen teykenen.} VEele hebben zich 't na 't leeven schilderen van menschentronien onderwonden, en zijn ook veeltijts daer op zoo verlekkert geworden, dat zy de rest van de konst geheel versloft hebben: ja zoo schandich vervallen zijn, dat zy niet alleen niet een arm of been, maer zelf niet een gezonde schouder aen den hals van haere Konterfeytsels hebben kunnen vastmaken. 't Is wel waer, dat het aengezicht het voornaemste deel eens menschen is; maer dies te min is 't te verschoonen, onbequaem tot de rest te zijn;[...] Een goede trony te kunnen maken is wel prijsselijk, maer een welstandige figuer met een maer taemelijke trony te maken, is meer.

[BLANC J, 2006, p. 130]{Un bon portraitiste doit au moins savoir dessiner une figure.}. Nombreux sont ceux qui cherchent à peindre sur le vif des visages d'hommes. Et souvent ils aiment tant faire cela qu'ils négligent totalement le reste de l'art, et qu'ils y échouent même si honteusement qu'ils sont incapables d'attacher un bras, une jambe et même une bonne épaule au cou de leurs portraits. Il est bien vrai que le visage est la partie la plus importante d'un homme. Mais cela n'excuse pas pour autant d'être incapable dans le reste. [....] Pouvoir faire un bon visage est bien louable. Mais savoir représenter une figure dans [ndr: une bonne position], même avec un visage passable est préférable.



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait

1 quotations

Quotation

Prens garde toutes-fois que par l’Anatomie
Tels Corps ne soient pas trop secs en ton Academie ;
Fay chois d’un beau Modelle, et pour le mouvement,
Mets l’Acte avec ardeur, et par fois mollement,
Selon la passion qui dans le Corps domine
Changeant suivant le temps, l’âge, le poil, la mine.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → apprentissage
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Soo namen dan d’oude Meesters dese vijf hoofd-stucken in haere Schilderyen op ’t aller nauste waer. I. Den Historischen inhoud, die veeltijds d’Inventie ofte oock ’t argument ghenaemt wordt. II. De ghelijck-maetigheyd, diemen doorgaens henen de Proportie, symmetrie, analogie, en harmonie noemt. III. De verwe ofte ’t Coleur; en daer in plaghten sy ’t licht en schaduwe, als oock ’t schijnsel en duysternisse naukeurighlick t’ onderscheyden. IV. Het leven; ’t welck in d’Actie en Passie bestaet, ofte (om duydelicker te spreken) in de bequame afbeeldinghe der eyghenschappen die men in de onroerende dingen verneemt, als oock in de levendighe uytdruckinghe der beweghinghen diemen in de roerende dinghen speurt, wanneer deselvighe yet merckelicks doen of lijden. V. De schickinghe, die men ghemeynlick de Dispositie ofte Ordinantie plaght te heeten.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] As such the old Masters observed these five chief principles very closely in their Paintings. I. The Historical content, that is often called the Invention or also the argument. II. The uniformity, which one commonly calls the Proportion, symmetry, analogy and harmony. III. The colour or the colouring; and in this they tend to carefully distinguish the light and shadow, as well as the sheen and darkness. IV. The life; which exists in the Action and Passion, or (to speak more clearly) in the skilled depiction of the characteristics that one discerns in the unmovable things, as well as in the lively expression of the movements that one perceives in the movable things, when these do or suffer something considerable. V. The arrangement, that one commonly tends to call the Disposition or Ordinance.

leven



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

4 quotations

Quotation

Of Action and Passion.
{4. Action and Passion.} The next observation, is out of which,
Life and Motion doth result : It shews no Action or Passion in a Piece, barely upright, looking forward ; the Armes hanging down, the feet close together, and so seems unmoveable, and stiff.
{How to be expressed} In lineall
Pieces, there may be a deceitfull similitude of Life and Motion, and statues may seem to live and breathe but coloured Pictures shew a lively force in the severall effects, and properties of Life and Spirit.
{And to be improved} To be well acquainted with
Nature, Manner, guize and behaviour ; as to paint a Man, angry or sad ; joyfull earnest ; or idle ; all passions to be proper to the figure : […]. Indeed the severall postures of the head, describe the Numbers of passions ; […]. In a word, each severall member or part of the body, either of themselves, or in reference of some other part, expresses the passions of the mind, as you may easily observe in the Life.
[…].
{By example of Titian’ Pieces.} I have seen a piece of
Tytian’s : A Child in the Mothers Lap playing with a Bird ; so round and pleasing, it seem’s a doubt whether a Sculpture or Painting ; whether Nature or Art, made it ; the mother smiles and speaks to : the child starts, and answers.
{And of
Palma’s Piece.} Another of Palma’s ; a speaking Piece indeed. The young Damsell brought for Old Davids Bedfellow ; all the company in Passion and Action : some in admiration of her beauty, others in examining her features, which so please the good Old Man, that in some Extasie of passion, he imbraces her which her humility admits, yet with a silent modesty as best became her, only to be dumb and so suffer.
[…].
[...] And so have we done with an Example of all in One : For
 
                       Invention
allures the mind.
                       Proportion, attracts the Eyes.
                       Colour ;
delights the Fancie.
                      
Lively Motion, stirs up our Soul.
                      
Orderly Disposition, charmes our Senses.
 
{Conclude a rare Picture.} These produce gracefull
Comliness, which makes one fairer then fair ; […].
This Grace is the close of all, effected by a familiar facility in a free and quick spirit of a bold and resolute Artificer ; not to be done by too much double
diligence, or over doing ; a careless shew, hath much of Art.

Sanderson reprend ici un passage d'une lettre de Sir Henry Wotton au Marquis de Buckingham, datant du 2 décembre 1622. Dans cette dernière, Sir H. Wotton mentionne l'achat d'une Vierge à l'Enfant de Titien et d'un David et Bethsabée exécuté par Palma le jeune (voir à ce propos HARD, Frederick, 1939, p. 230).



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

In imitation whereof, I hold it expedient for a Painter, to delight in seeing those which fight at cuffs, to observe the Eyes of privy murtherers, the courage of wrastlers, the actions of Stage-players, and the inticing allurements of curtesans, to the end he be not to seek many particulars, wherein the very Life and Soul of painting consisteth, wherefore, I could wish all Men carefully to keep their Brains waking, which whosoever shall omit his invention (out of doubt) will sleep, studying perhaps Ten Years about the action of one Figure, which in the end will prove nothing worth, whence all famous inventors, for the avoiding of such gross defects, have the rather shewed themselves subtile Searchers out of the effects of nature, being moved thereunto by a special delight of often seeing, and continually practizing that which they have preconceived, so that who so keepeth this Order, shall unawares attain to such an habit of practice, in lively expressing all Actions and Gestures, best fitting his purpose, that it will become an other nature.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

SECT. I. Of Actions or Gestures.
These are those that most nearly resemble the life, be it either in laughing, grieving, sleeping, fighting, wrastling, running, leaping, and the like.
Amongst the Ancients, famous for lively motion and gesture,
Leonard Vincent deserves much, whose custom was to behold clowns, condemned persons, and did mark the contracting of their brows, the motions of their eyes and whole bodies ; and doubtless it cannot but be very expedient for an Artist in this kind to behold the variety of exercises, that discovers various actions, where the motion is discovered between the living and the dead, the fierce and the gentle, the ignorant and learned, the sad and the merry.
John de Bruges was the first inventer of Oyl-painting, that deserv’d excellently in this particular.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

In Expression we must Regard the Sex, Man must appear more Resolute and Vigorous, his Actions more Free, Firm and Bold ; but Womans Actions more Tender, Easy and Modest.
            We must likewise Regard the
Age, whose different Times and Degrees carry them to different Actions, as well by the Agitations of the Minde as the Motions of the Body.
            We must also take Notice of the
Condition, if they be Men of great Extent and Honour, their Actions must be Reserv’d and Grave ; but if Plebeians, more Rude and Disorderly.
           
Bodys Deifyd must be Retrench’d of all those Corruptible Things which serve only for the Preservation of Humane Life, as the Veins, Nerves, Arterys ; and taking onely what serve for Beauty and Form.
            We must likewise observe to give to
Man Actions of Understanding ; to Children, Actions which only Express the Motions of their Passions ; to Brutes, purely the Motions of Sence.
[...].
            Nor is it sufficient that we observe
Action and Passion in their own Natures, in the Complection and Constitution ; in the Age, Sexe, and Condition : but we must likewise observe the Season of the Year in which we express them.
            The
Spring ; Merry, Nimble, Prompt and of a good Colour. The Summer, causeth Open and Wearisome Actions, Subject to sweating and Redness. Automn, Doutbfull, and something Inclining to Melancholly. Winter, Restrain’d, drawn in and Trembling.
[...].



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

2 quotations

Quotation

A l'égard de l'expression des passions particulieres l'on remarqua, que la passion est un mouvement de l'ame, qui reside en la partie sensitive [...] ; que d'ordinaire tout ce qui cause à l'ame de la passion fait faire quelque action au Corps, & qu'ainsi de sçavoir quelles sont les actions du Corps qui expriment les passions de l'ame, L'on dit que ce que l'on appelloit action en cet endroit, n'étoit autre chose que le mouvement de quelque partie, & que ce mouvement ne se faisoit que par le changement des muscles, [...] ; ainsi le muscle qui agit le plus reçoit le plus d'esprits, & par consequent devient enflé plus que les autres.
[...] L'on remarqua qu'encore qu'on puisse representer les passions de l'ame par les actions de tout le Corps, neanmoins que c'étoit au visage où les marques s'y faisoient le plus connoître, & non seulement dans les yeux comme quelques-uns l'ont crû, mais principalement en la forme & aux mouvements des sourcils ; que comme il y a deux appetits dans la partie sensitive de l'ame, il y a aussi deux mouvemens qui y ont un parfait rapport, les uns s'élevent au cerveau & les autres inclinent vers le coeur.

Cette définition correspond à celle donnée par Le Brun et que l’on retrouve dans sa Conférence de M. Le Brun, (...) sur l'expression générale et particulière (...) éditée en 1698, précisément à partir de la page 4 (et suivantes). Par ailleurs, une partie de ce passage de Testelin est repris par Florent Le Comte dans son Cabinet des singularitez (...), plus précisément aux pages 43-44 de son édition de 1699-1700 (Paris, Etienne Picart & Nicolas Le Clerc, tome I, vol. I).



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Que ce que l’on appelloit ACTION, n’est autre chose que le mouvement de quelque partie, & que ce mouvement ne se fait que par le changement des muscles, lesquels ne se meuvent que par l’entremise des nerfs qui les lient, & qui passent au travers d’eux. Que les nerfs n’agissent que par les esprits qui sont contenus dans les cavitez du cerveau, & que le cerveau ne reçoit ces esprits que du sang, qui passant continuellement par le cœur, fait qu’il se rechauffe, & se rarefie de telle sorte, que le plus subtil monte, & porte au cerveau certains petits airs ou vapeurs, lesquels passant par une infinité de petits vaisseaux, dont le cerveau est rempli, s’y spiritualisent, d’où ils se répandent aux autres parties, par le moyen des nerfs qui sont comme autant de filets, ou tuyaus qui portent ces esprits dans les muscles, selon qu’ils en ont besoin, plus ou moins, pour faire l’action à laquelle ils sont appellez : ainsi le muscle qui agit le plus, reçoit le plus d’esprits, & par consequent devient plus enflé que les autres.

Comme de nombreuses autres parties de texte, ce passage de Florent Le Comte est tiré de l'ouvrage "Les Sentimens (...)" de Testelin, plus précisément à la page 22 de l'édition de La Haye (Matthieu Rogguet, vers 1693-1694). Cet extrait est également tiré du livre "Les passions de l'âme" de René Descartes (Paris, Henry Le Gras, 1649), articles I et II.

mouvement



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

3 quotations

Quotation

Aristides, van affecten.

[D'après NOLDUS 2008, p. 5-7:] Aristide, en particulier, les affects.


Quotation

1 Gheen Mensch soo stantvastich, die mach verwinnen
Soo gantschlijck zijn ghemoedt en swack gheneghen,
Of d’Affecten en passien van binnen
En beroeren hem wel zijn hert’ en sinnen,
Dat d’uytwendighe leden mede pleghen,
En laten door een merckelijck beweghen,
Soo in ghestalten, ghedaenten, oft wercken,
Bewijselijcke litteyckenen mercken. {Niemant vry van passien, Affecten, oft Menschelijck swack gheneghen.}

 
2 De Natuer-condighe laten ons hooren,
Onderscheydelijck de namen der dinghen,
Affecten gheheeten, eerst en al vooren {VVat s’Menschen Affecten oft passien zijn.}
Liefde, begeerlijckheyt, vreucht, smert en tooren,
Commer en droefheyt, die t’herte bespringhen,
Cleynmoedicheyt, vreese quaet om bedwinghen,
Oock opgheblasentheyt, en nijdich veeten,
Dees en derghelijck, al Affecten heeten.

3 Aristides van Theben heeft dese stucken
(Ethe gheheeten, zijnde by de Griecken)
Alder eerst met de verwe gaen uytdrucken, {Aristides den eersten uytbeelder der Affecten.}
[…]

[D'après NOLDUS 2008, p. 85:] 1 Aucun homme n’est d’une telle constance et n’acquiert une telle maîtrise {Personne n’est libre de passions. Affects ou penchants causés par la faiblesse humaine.} de son âme et de ses penchants dus à sa faiblesse, que les Affects et passions ne le touchent au plus profond de son cœur et de ses sens. De la sorte, les membres extérieurs s’agitent de concert et en montrent, par un mouvement sensible aussi bien dans la posture, la tenue que dans l’action des signes incontestables. 2 Les connaisseurs de la Nature nous apprennent distinctement les noms de ce que l’on appelle Affects : {Quels sont les affects ou les passions de l’homme.} d’abord et avant tout l’Amour, et ensuite le désir, la joie, la douleur et la colère, le chagrin et la tristesse qui assiègent le cœur, la timidité et l’angoisse difficiles à réprimer, puis la suffisance et la jalousie hargneuse On appelle tout cela, et d’autres encore, Affects. 3 Aristide de Thèbes a exprimé ces sujets {Aristide est le premier à avoir représenté les affects.} (qui s’appellent Èthè chez les Grecs) pour la première fois en peinture. […]

Van Mander établit ici une équivalence entre les affects et les passions, équivalence qu’il étend à la strophe suivante à l’Ethe (âme), un terme grec qu’il emprunte au passage de Pline sur Aristide (Pline, HN, XXXV, 98). [MB]

passie


Quotation

4 Dees Affecten, zijn niet soo gaer en lichte
T’exprimeren, als sy wel zijn te loven,
Eerst met de leden van den aenghesichte {Met wat leden des aenschijns d’affecten uyt te beelden zijn.}
Thien oft wat meer van diverschen ghesichte
Als een voorhooft twee ooghen en daer boven
Twee wijnbrauwen en daer onder verschoven
Twee wanghen oock tusschen neus ende kinne
Een twee-lipte mondt met datter is inne.
 
5 Hier heeft den Schilder wel neerstich te waken,
En t’natuerlijck wesen wel te doorloeren,
Om dees gheleders soo ghestelt te maken
Teghen malcanderen, dat sy de saken
Te kennen gheven, die t’herte beroeren,
Om met sLichaems gesten sulcx uyt te voeren :
Want al wat d’affecten moghen bedrijven,
Wijst Natuer al meer, dan men can beschrijven. {Natuere wijst d’Affecten.}
 
6 Doch ten waer niet behoorlijck, dat wy heelden
Eenighe maniere, reghel en orden,
Om nu dese dinghen wel uyt te beelden,
Op dat al onse personnagen speelden
nae Histrionica Const, en ontgorden
Sulcke gesten, daer sy toe sullen worden
Op de Scena ghestelt, t’zy in Comedy
Met blijschap, oft in droeflijcke Tragedy. {Histrionica zijn gesten, ghelijck die de Comedy spelers ghebruycken.}

[D'après NOLDUS 2008, p. 86:] 4 On ne peut pas exprimer ces Affects {Avec quelles parties du visage on doit exprimer les affects.} aussi complètement et facilement qu’on pourrait les apprécier. Il y a d’abord les parties du visage. Elles sont dix ou davantage, et d’aspect différent : le front, deux yeux, et là-dessus, deux sourcils, et plus bas, deux joues, entre le nez et le menton, une bouche à deux lèvres avec son contenu. 5 Le Peintre doit faire très attention et percer à jour leur essence, afin de disposer ces parties les unes par rapport aux autres de telle façon qu’elles montrent ce qui touchent le cœur, et afin de réaliser cela par les mouvements du Corps. En effet, tout ce que les Affects peuvent accomplir la Nature nous le montre mieux que toute description. {La Nature nous enseigne les Affects.} 6 Toutefois, il ne serait pas convenable de cacher quelques manières, règles et ordres de bien représenter ces choses. Ainsi, tous nos personnages jouent selon les principes de l’Art histrionique {Les histrioniques sont les gestes utilisés par les Comédiens.} et font les gestes pour lesquels ils ont été mis sur la scène, soit dans une Comédie, avec allégresse, soit dans une triste Tragédie.


6 quotations

Quotation

La Peinture est un Art, qui par le moyen des lignes proportionnées, & avec des couleurs semblables à la nature des sujets, suivant la lumière de la Perspective, imite si bien la nature des choses corporelles, que non seulement elle represente sur un plan la grosseur & le relief des corps, mais encore le mouvement ; & monstre visiblement à nos yeux plusieurs affections & passions de l’Ame.

Terme traduit par AFFETTO dans Lomazzo, 1585, p. 19.

passion


Quotation

Et la grace s’engendre de l’uniformité des mouvemens interieurs causés par les affections et les sentiments de l’ame.

sentiments de l'âme · mouvement intérieur


Quotation

{XXIX. Des Passions.} 
D'exprimer outre tout cela les Mouvemens des esprits & les Affections qui ont leur siege dans le cœur ; en un mot, de faire avec un peu de couleurs que l'ame nous soit visible,* c'est où consiste la plus grande difficulté […]

passion


Quotation

Le Peintre doit suivre en toutes choses l’ordre de la Nature [...] Mais encore d’exprimer outre tout cela les mouvemens des esprits, & les affections qui ont leur siege dans le coeur. En un mot de faire avec un peu de couleurs, que l’ame nous soit visible par la diversité de ses passions, c’est ou consiste la plus grande difficulté, car assurément il s’en trouve fort peu, puisqu’il n’appartient qu’aux Esprits qui participent en quelque chose de la Divinité, à découvrir de si grandes merveilles.
Les Philosophes disent que les mouvemens de l’ame qui sont étudiez, ne sont jamais si naturels que ceux qui se voyent dans la chaleur d’une veritable passion. Un Peintre qui a un grand genie, & qui sçait la Physionomie, peut marquer sur le visage de l’homme quelques passions qu’il peut avoir dans l’ame, comme la Joye, la Tristesse, la Colere, la Fureur, le Chagrin, la Melancholie, l’Avarice, l’Envie, le Mépris, la douleur, &c.


Quotation

Quand vous parlez d’expressions, interrompit Pymandre, n’entendez-vous pas les passions de l’ame qui paroissent sur le visage, & que le Peintre represente selon la nature du sujet qu’il traite.
Le mot d’expression en general, repartis-je, se doit prendre dans la Peinture, aussi bien qu’en toute autre chose pour la veritable & naturelle representation de ce que l’on veut faire voir & donner à connoistre. Ainsi l’expression s’estend à traiter une histoire dans toutes les circonstances qu’elle demande pour instruire ; à representer un corps avec toutes ses parties dans l’action qui luy est convenable ; à voir sur le visage les passions necessaires aux figures que l’on peint. Et comme c’est sur le visage que l’on connoist mieux les affections de l’ame, on se sert ordinairement du mot expression pour signifier les passions que l’on veut exprimer.
Ce sont, dit Pymandre, ces differentes images de nos passions qui sont difficiles à bien representer, & en quoy tous les Peintres n’ont pas également reussi.

passion


Quotation

L'on rapporta à ce propos, ce que quelques naturalistes ont écrit de la physionomie, à sçavoir, que les affections de l'ame suivent le temperament du corps, & que les marques exterieures sont des signes certains des affections de l'ame [...] ; que le mot de Physionomie est un mot composé du Grec, qui signifie regle ou loi de nature, par lesquelles les affections de l'ame ont du rapport à la forme du corps : qu'ainsi il y a des signes fixes & permanents qui font connoître les passions de l'ame, à sçavoir celle qui reside en la partie sensitive.

passion · expression des passions



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

4 quotations

Quotation

{And Affection, what ?} Affection, is to express Passion in the figure ; Gladnesse, Grief, Fear, Anger, with motion and gesture of any Action. And this is a ticklish skill of the hand, for Passions of contrary Nature, with a touch of the Pensil, alter the Countenance, from Mirth to Mourning, as a coincident extream.


Quotation

SECT. II. Of the Passions or Complexions.
Man’s Body is composed of the Four Elements.
Melancholly resembles Earth.
Flegm the Water.
Choler the Fire.
Bloud the Air ; and answerable are the Gestures and Humours.
Melancholly bodies are slow, heavy, and restrained ; and the consequents are anxiety, disquietness, sadness, stubborness, &c. in which horror and despair will appear.
Flegmatick bodies are simple, humble, merciful.
Sanguine bodies are temperate, modest, gracious, princely, gentle, and merry ; to whom these affections of the mind best agree, viz. love, delight, pleasure, desire, mirth, and hope.
Cholerick bodies are violent, boisterous, arrogant, bold, and fierce ; to whom these passions appertain, anger, hatred, and boldness ; and accordingly the skillful Artist expresses the motions of these several bodies, which ought Philosophically to be understood.


Quotation

ABOUT this Time flourish’d Arestides, whose Excellency lay in expressing the Passions and Affections, and decyphering all the Virtues and Vices, and as particularly appear’d by that Piece of his of the Indulgent Mother, mortally wounded in the Body, and a sucking Infant hanging at the same Time upon her Breast, where, unconcern’d for her own Life, she express’d a wonderful Reluctancy, and strange Strife within her in regard to the Infant, as loath to deny it Food, and unwilling to give it the Breast, for fear of destroying it with her Blood, which mingled with her Milk, issued forth in great abundance. This Table was dear to Alexander, and carried along with him to Pella.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

BUT he, of all the PAINTERS, worthy of the highest Reputation, after the Death of Cimabus, was his Disciple Giotto, […] he became Famous for his excellent Skill in expressing the Affections, and all Manner of Gesture, so happily representing every Thing with such an identity and peculiar Conformity to the Original Idea, that he was said to be the true Scholar if Nature.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

Les santimens que quelques naturalistes ont écrit de la Physionomie, sont que les affections de l’ame suivent le temperamment du corps, & que les marques exterieures sont des signes certains des affections de l’ame que l’on connoist en la forme de chaque animal, ses mœurs & sa complexion ; par exemple, le Lion est robuste & nerveux, aussi il est fort ; le Leopard est soûple […], Les Phisionomistes disent que s’il arrive qu’un homme ait quelque partie du corps semblable à celle d’une bête, il faut tirer des conjectures de ses inclinations, ce que l’on apelle Phisionomie, que le mot de Phisionomie est composé du Grec, qui signifie regle ou loi de nature, par lesquelles les affections de l’ame ont du raport à la forme du corps : qu’ainsi il y a des signes fixes & permanens qui font connoître les passions de l’ame, à sçavoir celles qui resident en la partie sensitive. Quelques Philosophes ont dit, que l’on peut exercer cette science par dissimilitude, c’est a dire par les contraires, par exemple si la dureté du poil est un signe du naturel rude & farouche, la molesse l’est d’un qui sera doux & tendre, de même si la poitrine couverte d’un poil épais est le signe du naturel chaud & colere, celle qui est sans poil marque la mansuetude & la douceur.

passion de l'âme


10 quotations

Quotation

{Die Affecten oder Gemütsregungen/ sind in der Bild-Mahlerey zu beobachten:} DEr kunstreiche Mahler/ soll nicht allein wol verstehen/ die vier Complexionen oder {Die Affecten oder Gemütsregungen/ sind in der Bild-Mahlerey zu beobachten:} Natur-Arten des Menschen/ als Sanguineo, Cholerico, Phlegmatico und Melancholico, sondern auch/ wie und warum sich die unter einander vermischen. Die Wirkungen derselben/ werden ingemein die Affecten oder Gemüts-regungen genennet: weil sie/ wie die leibliche {weil sie Gestalt und Farbe ändern.} Zufälle dem Leib/ das Gemüt afficiren und bewegen. {weil sie Gestalt und Farbe ändern.} Diese Wissenschaft/ ist in unserer Kunst nicht zu verunachtsamen: sintemal dieselbe nicht geringe Veränderungen des Angesichts und der Gestalt des Menschen/ auch der Farbe/ verursachen.

Gemütsregung


Quotation

{Angenehme Affecten/ Freude/ Hoffnung/ Liebe: Wirkung derselben im Angesicht}. Durch diese/ wird die natürliche Wärme/ samt den Geistern/ entweder langsam und allgemach/ oder aber schnell und geschwind/ zu Niessung der gegenwärtigen oder künftigen/ verlangten Dinge/ in den ganzen Leib ausgespreitet. Dann hierbey thut das Herz sich auf/ dem jenigen/ was es begehrt/ zu begegnen und es zu umfahen. Das ganze Angesicht wird erhöhet/ mit einer schönen Rosenfarbe. […]
{Gestalt des Angesichts/ in Freud-Bewegung.} […]


Quotation

{Correspondenz des Herzens mit den Sinnen/ und Geburt der Affecten}. Dann das Herz/ welches mit den Correspondenz des Herzens mit den Sinnen/ und Geburt der Affecten. Sinnen in genauer Correspondenz stehet/ wann diese ihm die Gegenwart des verlangten Dinges/ ansagen/ sendet die dadurch aufgeregte Wärme in das Angesicht/ als den Sitz der Sinnen/ und verursacht damit eine Röte. Dann solche Gegenwart/ wird erstlich durch die Augen ersehen/ durch die Ohren vernommen/ mit Händen betastet/ und durch andere äuserliche Sinnen ergriffen/ und tritt zugleich durch diese Pforten in den innerlichen Sinn und Verstand: welcher es also fort dem Herzen ansaget. Dieses alles geschihet in einem Augenblick/ und ist hieraus die Geschwindigkeit der Lebens-geister mit Verwunderung zu beobachten.


Quotation

Auf solche weise/ wird die Physiognomia durch die Affecten/ verändert/ die Gemütsregung/aber durch äuserliche Objecten oder Gegenstände verursachet. Der Verstand beurtheilet/ was die Sinnen ergriffen/ und durch die Einbildungs-Kraft ihme zugesendet/ ob es gut oder böse sey: daraus dann Freude oder Verdruß entstehet. Daher wird nicht bald ein vernünftiger Mensch lachen/ es sey dann/ daß eine That oder Gespräch/ so ihm darzu Ursach gibt/ vorher gehe. Nachdem die Einbildungs-Kraft eine Form oder Gestalt des Dings/ so etwan erfreuen kan/ empfangen und gefasset hat/ bewegt und treibt sie das Herz: welches in dieser Bewegung sich gleichsam aufthut/ den erfreuten Gegensatz zu umfahen. Unterdessen wird/ durch diese Eröffnung des Herzens/ die natürliche Wärme/ samt den Geistern und dem Geblüte/ haufen-weis in den ganzen Leib ausgebreitet. Weil nun der meiste Theil dieser Wärme/ Geister und Geblüts/ Gestalt des Angesichts/ in Freudbewegung wie erwehnet/ zu dem Angesicht aufsteiget/ blehet sich dasselbe gleichsam auf und wird erweitert: die Stirn/ wird heiter/ glatt und frech; die Augen schimmern/ und werden hell; die Backen erröten/ als wann sie mit Zinober gefärbet wären; die Leffzen ziehen sich ein/ werden gleich und eben. Bey etlichen/ bekommen die Wangen oder Backen zwey kleine Grüblein: das geschihet/ wegen Zusammenziehung des Fleisches oder der Meuse an selbigem Orte. Und dieses alles/ ist wol zu beobachten.

Gemütsregung


Quotation

Verdrüssliche Affecten: der Zorn; dessen Wirkung in der äuserlichen Gestalt; die Traurigkeit […] Wirkung der Furcht […] Wirkung der Schamhaftigkeit/und Angst. […]
Neun andere Gemütsregungen […]
Zu diesen Sechs Gemütsregungen/ werden alle andere referirt und gezogen: als der Haß und die Zweytracht/ zum Zorn; die Leichtsinnigkeit und Ruhmsucht/ zur Freude; der Schrecken und die Kleinmütigkeit/ zur Furcht; die Mißgunst/ Leid und Verzweiflung/ zur Traurigkeit. Und hieraus erhellet genugsam/ wie vielfältig die Affecten/ des Menschen Gestalt/ Angesichter/ Gebärden und Farbe/ verändern können.

Gemütsregung


Quotation

{Das Angesicht/ist dies Herzens Uhrzeiger: } Maßen das Angesichtgleichsam der Zeiger ist/ an dem Uhrwerk des Herzens/ und die Stirn dessen Bewegungen anzusagen pfleget. {macht die Menschen und Nationen vor einander unterscheiden und erkennen} Ja so gar ist das Angesicht gleichsam eine Figur des innerlichen Menschen/ daß man daraus einen alten Mann von einem jungen/ ein Weib von einem Mann/ einen Mäßigen von einem Unmäßigen/ einen Gesunden von einem Kranken; auch die Nationen/ einen Mohren von einem Indianer/ einen Franzosen von einem Spanier/ einen Teutschen von einem Italiäner/ endlich auch einen Lebendigen von einem Todten/ leichtlich unterscheiden kan. Und dieses geschihet eben darum/ weil man/ aus dem Angesicht/ das Gemüte und die Sitten des Menschen/ auch oftmals/ was im tiefsten seines Herzens verborgen liget/ errahten kann

Gemütsregung


Quotation

So wird nun der/ so in dieser Wissenschaft andere übertrifft/ billig für den grösten Meister gehalten: gleichwie der nur für einen mittelmäßigen Künstler passirt wird/ der diese erzehlte Affecten nur etlicher maßen wahrnimmet. Die aber/ so gar nichts hierinn thun können/ sind nur für Sudler zu halten: wie sehr sie auch ihnen selbst/ mit Kunst-Einbildung/ schmeichlen mögen.


Quotation

{Diese Wissenschaft [ndr: der Affecten] macht einen fürtrefflichen Mahler} Die Mahler-Kunst/ hat auch dißfalls eine Verwandschaft mit der Red- und Dicht-Kunst: weil/ nach der Aussage Tulii auch ihnen/ wie den Oratoren und Poeten obliget/ zugleich zu unterweisen/ zu belüstigen und zu bewegen. Ihr Pflicht bringet mit sich/ (sagt er) daß sie uns sollen unterweisen/ ihre Schuldigkeit ist/ zu Vermehrung ihrer Ehre/ daß sie uns sollen belüstigen; die Notturft ihres Beruffs erfordert/ daß sie unsere Herzen bewegen sollen. Je fürtrefflicher und höher aber eine Kunst oder ein Ding ist/ je tauglicher ist sie/ uns zu bewegen.


Quotation

Gleiche Meinung {Auch die Temperamenten/ und Gemühts-Wirckungen/ Passionen und Affecten zu beobachten.} hat es auch mit Erkennung und Erlernung der viererley Complexionen des Menschen/ mit den Wirckungen des Gemüts/ der Angesichter/ Farben/ und Ursachen der Veränderungen; vorab mit den Gestalten der Zornigen Abscheulichkeit/ der Furcht/ oder Schreckbarkeit/ der Schamhafftigkeit/ Angst/ Misgunst/ Neides und Leides/ der Traurigkeit und Verzweifflung: als wodurch alle des Menschen Gestalt/ Angesichter/ Geberden und Farben verändert werden.

Gemüths-Wirkung · Passion


Quotation

Der dritte Discours von der Mahlerey. Das III. Capitel. Worauf über dieses in HISTORIEN-Gemählden besonders zu sehen, p. 68 
[Ist ferner nöthig auf folgende Stücke mit Achtung zu geben]
4. Auf die besondern Affecten einer jeden Person/ daß aus ihrem Gesichte/ und aus ihrer Action könne geschlossen werden/ was die Person andeuten und vorstellen solle. Auch in diesem Stück kan
le Brun, sonderlich aber das jenige Stück/ da er Alexandrum und Ephestion gemahlet/ wie sie zu des Darius Familie in das Gezelt kommen/ vor ein Haupt exempel dienen. Doch hat ihn Rubens noch darinnen übertroffen.


4 quotations

Quotation

Et pour moy, la pensée m’est venuë en voyant les excellens morceaux qui nous en restent, principalement à Rome ; que outre la belle & agreable proportion que l’on voit à la Venus de Medicis, à celle de Belvedere, à la Flore, au Commode, à l’Hercule de Farneze, au Meleagre, à l’Apollon, & au Lentin, puis en ce merveilleux ouvrage du l’Aocoom & de ses deux enfans, & à un grand nombre d’autres, qui sont tous differens au détail de leurs proportions, taille & air de testes, qu’ils estoient tres-sçavans en l’Anatomie & en la Physionomie, car j’ay remarqué dans les airs de testes de leurs diverses figures faites à plaisir, ou à volonté, qui representoient mesme des fleuves, une grave sagesse, douce, beninne, au lieu que la pluspart de nos Sculpteurs d’apresent, leurs donneroient volontiers un air de visage rustique et furieux.

Le terme "air" est associé aux termes "teste" et "visage".


Quotation

Les passions de l'ame, reprit Philarque, s'expriment par les mouvemens, non seulement des parties du visage, mais encore de celles du corps : Et de toutes les passions il y en a de violentes, il y en a de douces. Les violentes sont beaucoup moins difficiles à exprimer, & Rubens y a reüssi autant bien que Peintre qui l'ait precedé. Mais pour les expressions douces, soit qu'elles paroissent comme un effet de la tranquillité de l'âme, ou qu'elles soient de ces sortes de passions qui causant peu de changement sur le visage, ne laissent pas de faire voir que le dedans est fort agité, c'est où Rubens a merveilleusement bien reüssi : il y en a une infinité d'exemples dans ses Ouvrages.


Quotation

Sur les Airs de Têtes Antiques l'on jugea qu'un habile homme après avoir Etudié les belles figures Antiques, en avoir conçû les plus grandes idées, & imprimé dans son esprit les plus beaux traits de la Phisionomie selon l'expression de leur caracteres, qui est comme le suc & le prescis de cette Etude, les pourra appliquer à l'expression des figures qu'il aura à representer : Que l'intention de Leonard d'Avincit n'est en cet endroit que de reprimer le mauvais goût de ceux qui bornent leurs genies à certains airs pris des Antiques, & les appliquent à tous sans discernement.

physionomie · expression


6 quotations

Quotation

233. [C'est où consiste la plus grande difficulté] pour deux raisons ; & parce qu'il en faut faire une grande étude, tant sur les belles Antiques & sur les beaux Tableaux, que sur la Nature ; & parce que cette Partie dépend presque entierement du Genie, & qu’elle semble estre purement un don du Ciel, que nous avons receu dés nostre naissance […] neantmoins il est à mon avis necessaire que les uns & les autres apprennent parfaitement le Caractère de chaque Passion.
Toutes les actions de l’Appetit sensitif sont appellées Passions, dautant qu’elles agitent l’Ame, & que le Corps y patit & s’y altere sensiblement : Ce sont ces diverses agitations & ces differens mouvemens de tout le Corps en general, & de chacune de ses Parties en particulier, que nostre Excellent Peintre doit connoistre, dont il doit faire son estude, & se former une parfaite Idée. Mais il sera fort à propos de sçavoir d’abord que les Philosophes en admettent onze ; l’Amour, la Haine, le Desir, la Fuïte, la Joye, la Tristesse, l’Esperance, le Desespoir, la Hardiesse, la Crainte, & la Colere. Les Peintres les multiplient non seulement par leurs differens degrez, mais encore par leurs differentes especes : car ils feront par exemple six personnes dans le mesme degré de Crainte, qui exprimeront cette Passion tous differemment ; & c’est cette diversité d’especes qui fait faire la distinction des Peintres qui sont veritablement habiles, d’avec ceux qu’on appelle Manieristes, & qui repetent jusqu’à cinq ou six fois dans un mesme Tableau les mesmes Airs de teste. […] 


Quotation

D'ailleurs quelle beauté & quelle diversité dans les airs de teste de ce tableau [ndr : La tente de Darius de Le Brun] ; ils sont tous grands, tous nobles, & si cela se peut dire, tous heroïques en leur maniere, de mesme que les vestemens, que le Peintre a recherchez avec un soin & une étude inconcevable. Dans le tableau des Pelerins toutes les testes & toutes les draperies, hors celles du Christ & des deux disciples qui ont quelque noblesse ; sont prises sur des hommes & des femmes de la connoissance du Peintre, ce qui avilit extremement la composition de ce tableau, & fait un mélange aussi mal assorti, que si dans une Tragedie des plus sublimes on mesloit quelques Scenes d'un stile bas & comique.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Sur les Airs de Têtes Antiques l'on jugea qu'un habile homme après avoir Etudié les belles figures Antiques, en avoir conçû les plus grandes idées, & imprimé dans son esprit les plus beaux traits de la Phisionomie selon l'expression de leur caracteres, qui est comme le suc & le prescis de cette Etude, les pourra appliquer à l'expression des figures qu'il aura à representer : Que l'intention de Leonard d'Avincit n'est en cet endroit que de reprimer le mauvais goût de ceux qui bornent leurs genies à certains airs pris des Antiques, & les appliquent à tous sans discernement.

physionomie · expression


Quotation

Celui qui représente la continence de Scipion semble un peu mieux colorié ; mais pour le coup, M. Restout me permettra de lui dire que ce sujet ne lui convenait en rien. Il s’agissoit d’y caractériser dans tout son éclat, une personne célebre par la beauté dont les charmes étoient si forts & si puissans qu’il étoit comme impossible d’y résister : On relevoit parlà adroitement, le mérite de Scipion qui eut le courage prodigieux d’en triompher ? Point du tout ; on se contente de nous croquer ici séchement une matrone de la plus mauvaise grâce du monde ; & qui n’est remarquable uniquement que par sa laideur. Ce n’est point là ce qu’il falloit encore une fois, mais M. Restout ne pouvoit pas mieux faire dans ce genre. Cet Auteur devroit bien s’étudier à mieux connoitre ce qui lui est propre. Comment pouvoit-il nous donner quelque idée de la beauté, lui qui n’a pu, encore atteindre à nous représenter des caracteres simples & ordinaires ? Je n’en veux pour exemple que ses Tableaux de Dévotion, qui sont comme on sait le fort de cet Auteur. Cependant quelles attitudes dures & forcées n’y voit-on pas ? Quelles grimaces pour des expressions ? Quels airs de tête effrayans & bizarres !



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

1 quotations

Quotation

The Airs of the Heads in my Holy Family of Rafaëlle are perfectly fine, according to the several Characters ; that of the Blessed Mother of God has all the Sweetness, and Goodness that could possibly appear in her self ; what is particularly remarkable is that the Christ, and the S. John are both Boys, but the latter is apparently Humane, the other, as it ought to be, Divine.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

1 quotations

Quotation

Der dritte Discours von der Mahlerey. Das III. Capitel. Worauf über dieses in HISTORIEN-Gemählden besonders zu sehen, p. 68 
[Ist ferner nöthig auf folgende Stücke mit Achtung zu geben]
4. Auf die besondern Affecten einer jeden Person/ daß aus ihrem Gesichte/ und aus ihrer Action könne geschlossen werden/ was die Person andeuten und vorstellen solle. Auch in diesem Stück kan
le Brun, sonderlich aber das jenige Stück/ da er Alexandrum und Ephestion gemahlet/ wie sie zu des Darius Familie in das Gezelt kommen/ vor ein Haupt exempel dienen. Doch hat ihn Rubens noch darinnen übertroffen.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

[...] C’est en cet Ouvrage [ndr : groupe sculpté par Phidias représentant le Parnasse] que l’on peut dire que l’Art a égalé la Nature ; car ce sçavant Sculpteur [ndr : Phidias] avoit mis tant de grace, de beauté, de guayté dans toutes ces Figures, qu’il sembloit avoir fait vivre le marbre, & qu’il n’y manquoit que la parole.

Le but l’art est d’imiter la nature et d’insuffler la vie aux figures représentées



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la peinture

1 quotations

Quotation

Pour bien me faire entendre, il faut que je distingue trois choses dans la peinture. La representation des figures, l'expression des passions, & la composition du tout ensemble. Dans la representation des figures je comprens non seulement la juste delineation de leurs contours, mais aussi l'application des vraies couleurs qui leur conviennent. Par l'expression des passions, j'entens les differens caracteres des visages & les diverses attitudes des figures qui marquent ce qu'elles veulent faire, ce qu'elles pensent, en un mot ce qui se passe dans le fond de leur ame. Par la composition du tout ensemble j'entens l'assemblage judicieux de toutes ces figures, placées avec entente, & dégradées de couleur selon l'endroit du plan où elles sont posées. 
Ce que je dis icy d'un tableau où il y a plusieurs figures, se doit entendre aussi d'un tableau où il n'y en a qu'une, parce que les différentes parties de cette figure sont entr'elles ce que plusieurs figures sont les unes à l'égard des autres. Comme ceux qui apprennent à peindre commencent par apprendre à designer le contour des figures, & à le remplir de leurs couleurs naturelles ; qu'ensuite ils s'étudient à donner de belles attitudes à leurs figures & à bien exprimer les passions dont ils veulent qu'elles, paroissent animées, mais que ce n'est qu'après un long-temps qu'ils sçavent ce qu'on doit observer pour bien disposer la composition d'un tableau, pour bien distribuer le clair obscur, & pour bien mettre toutes choses dans les regles de la perspective ; tant pour le trait que pour l’affoiblissement des ombres & des lumieres.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Rede bey Examinirung eines Kunst-Gemäldes, p. 31
Angehends das Dritte Theil/ die
Expression, so eussern sich hierbey recht geistereiche Anmerckungen/ dann die Gebehrden der meisten Figuren dieses Gemäldes/ leiten das Auge des Anschauers so gleich auf die Haupt-Figur/ so hat er ller dreyen Personen ihre Gebährden den recht eigentlich nach dem Ambt und dem Stande eines jederen ins besondere wohl exprimiret und aus-gedrücket ; […]/ 



Other conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

1 quotations

Quotation

Il faut donc concevoir pour une bonne fois ce que l’on doit trouver de beau dans ces figures ; la correction de la forme y est entiere, la pureté & l’élegance des contours, la naïveté & la noblesse des expressions, la varieté, le beaux choix, l’ordre & la negligence des ajustemens ; mais sur tout une grand simplicité, qui retranche tous les ornemens superflus, qui n’admet que ceux où l’artifice semble n’avoir aucune part, & qui rendant la nature toûjours maîtresse, la fait voir plus noble, plus grande, & plus majestueuse : voilà ce qu’on peut trouver de plus remarquable dans les Sculptures antiques, & ce qui en fait le veritable goût.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

1 quotations

Quotation

52. [Les beautez fuyantes & passageres] ne sont autres, que celles que nous remarquons dans la Nature pour tres-peu de temps, & qui ne sont pas fort attachées à leurs sujets ; telles sont les Passions de l'Ame. Il y a de ces sortes de beautez qui ne durent qu'un moment, comme les mines differentes que fera une assemblée à la veuë d'un spectacle impreveu & non commun ; quelque particularité d'une Passion violente, quelque action faite avec grace, un souris, une œillade, un mépris, une gravité, & mille autres choses semblables. On peut encore mettre au nombre des beautez passageres, les beaux nuages, tels qu'ils sont ordinairement apres la pluye ou apres le tonnere. 



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → paysage

1 quotations

Quotation

[…] want ieder beeld moet geen meêr hertstogten dan zyn eigen uitdrukken; {Hoedanigheid in de zinnebeelden vereisselyk.} maar wanneer zy tot byvoegzel of zieraad gebruykt worden, moeten zy haar werking doen of helpen […]

[D'après DE LAIRESSE 1787, p.178-179:] […] car chaque figure ne doit exprimer la passion qu’elle représente, en concourant toujours à l’expression générale; & pour cela il faut qu’elle soit placée à l’endroit convenable.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

1 quotations

Quotation

Of the Vertue and Efficacy of Motion.


It is generally confessed of all Men, that all such
Motions in Pictures, as do most neerly resemble the Life, are exceeding pleasant, and contrarywise those that which do farthest dissent from the same, are void of all gracious Beauty, committing the like discord in Nature, which untuned strings do in an instrument. Neither do these motions thus lively imitating Nature in Pictures, breed only an Eye-pleasing contentment, but do also performe the self same effects, which the natural do, for as he which laugheth, mourneth, or is otherwise effected, doth naturally move the beholders to the self same passion, of mirth or sorrow, so a picture artificially expressing the true natural motions, will (surely) procure laughter when it laugheth, pensiveness when it is grieved &c. […], All which points are (in truth) worthy of no less admiration then those miracles of the antient Musicians, who with the variety of their melodious harmony, were wont to stir Men up to wrath and indignation, love, warr, […]. 
But to return thither were I left, I am of Opinion that insomuch as these Motions are so Potent in affecting our Minds, when they be most artifcially counterfeited, we ought for our bettering in the knowledge thereof, to propose unto us the example of Leonard Vincent above all others : Of whom, it is reported, that he would never express any motion in a Picture, before he had first carefully beheld the Life, to the end he might come as neer the same, as was possible : whereunto afterwards joyning Art, his Pictures surpassed the Life.



Other conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Quotation

Belle expression,
Signifie, quand dans un Tableau, les Figures ou autres Corps qui le composent, expriment bien leur effet, tant en leurs actions, Gestes ou autres mouvemens, qu’aux principales parties qui servent à exprimer leurs passions ; & ainsi de mesme de tous les autres Corps suivant leur Nature.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

5 quotations

Quotation

Waer uyt het dan blijckt dat den Konstenaer maer alleen duydelick ende uytdruckelick wercken kan, de welcke de dinghen die hy ter handt treckt als teghenwoordigh aenschouwt. 't Welck meest van allen in de herts-tochten of te in de inwendighe beweginghen onses ghemoedts plaetse heeft; want overmidts de selvighe al te mets in de waerheyd bestaen, seght Quintilianus {lib. Xi cap. 3}, ende al te mets in de imitatie; soo is 't dat de waere beroeringhen naturelick uytbersten, maer ’t ontbreeckt hun aen de Konst; dies moetense oock door de leeringhe soo wat ghefatsoeneert worden. De gheimiteerde beroeringhen daer en teghen, ghelijckse de Konst hebben, soo ontbreeckt het hun aen de nature; en daerom is dit alhier 't voornaemste, dat men sich 't echt wel bewoghen vindt om de verbeeldinghen niet anders te vatten, als of het waerachtighe dinghen waeren daer mede wy ons selver besich houden.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Which then makes it evident that the Artist can only clearly and expressively work out those things which he traces by hand when he beholds them presently. Which most of all takes place in the passions or the inner movements of our mind; because although it exists coincidentally in the truth, says Quintilianus {…}, and coincidentally in the imitation; it is as such that the true stirrings burst out naturally, but they lack art, this has to somehow be shaped through learning. The imitated stirrings on the other hand, although they have Art, they then lack in nature; and therefore it is here the most significant that one is truly moved to not understand the representations differently, as if it were real things that we occupy ourselves with.


Quotation

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] A complete and ably done Invention has to spring forth from a large and deeply rooted wisdom; no studies should be unknown to us; we have to know all about the whole antiquity together with the countless number of Poetic and Historical tales; yet it is most necessary that we thoroughly understand the manifold movements of the human mind as well as all the special characteristics of it, seen that the great and admired power of these Arts lays most in the lively expression of such commotion. So we understand how the Artists were once judged with a special insight as wise men; seen that one can hardly find one in all the other free Arts, who has to deal more with the help of a high and well-evoked wisdom.

This section is not included in the first Latin edition (1637). [MO]

bewegingh


Quotation

Ghelijck dan de oude Konstenaers een seer treffelicke maniere van wercken ghehadt hebben, soo hadden sy mede een sonderlinghe gaeve om sich de waere verbeeldinghe van allerley beweghinghen onses ghemoeds op ’t aller levendighste voor te stellen; ja wy moghen ’t oock vrijelick daer voor houden, dat sy haere wercken nimmermeer met sulcke bequaeme uytdruckinghen van de verscheydene herts-tochten souden vervult hebben, ’t en waer saecke dat sy met pijne waerd gheacht hadden alle die naturelicke beroerten wijslick nae te speuren door de welcke ons ghemoed verruckt ende den gewoonlicken schijn onses wesens verscheydenlick verandert wordt. Zeuxis heeft de schilderije van Penelope gemaeckt, so dat hy de sedigheyd haeres eerbaeren wesens daer in konstighlick schijnt uytghedruckt te hebben. Plin. XXXV.9. Timomachus heeft den raesenden Aiax afghemaelt, en hoe hy sich in dese uytsinnighe dolligheyd al aenstelde Philostr. Lib. II. de vita Apollonii. Cap. 10. Silanion heeft den wrevelmoedighen Konstenaer Apollodorus ghemaeckt; ende overmids desen Apollodorus eenen rechten korselkop was, soo ist dat Silanion niet alleen den Konstenaer selver, maer sijn koppighe krijghelheydt met eenen oock in ’t koper heeft ghegoten Plin. XXXIV.8. Protogenes heeft Philiscus geschildert, als wesende met eenighe diepe bedenckinghen opghenomen Plin. XXXV.10. Praxiteles heeft Phryne ghemackt, als of men haer weelderigh herte in een volle Zee van vreughd en wellust sach swemmen, Plin. XXXIV.8. Parrhasius maeckten eenen jonghelingh die in sijne wapenrustinge om strijd loopt, Plin. XXXV.10. Den Anapanomenos van Aristides sterft uyt liefde van sijnen broeder, Plin. ibidem. Philostratus {Iconoum Lib. I. in Ariadne} beschrijft ons de schilderije van eenen Bacchus die maer alleen bekent wordt by de minne-stuypen die hem quellen. Dese exempelen gheven ons ghenoegh te verstaen, hoe grooten ervaerenheyd d’oude Meesters in’t uytdrucken van allerley beroerten ende beweghinghen ghehad hebben;

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Just like the old Artists had a very striking manner of working, as such they had a special gift to imagine the true representation of all sorts of movements of our mind in the most lively way; yes we may also interpret freely, that they would never have filled their works again with such able expressions of the different passions, if they had not have thought it painfully worthful to wisely trace all those natural commotions by which our mind delights and the common appearance of our being is changed varyingly. Zeuxis has made a painting of Penelope, in a way that he appears to have artfully depicted the modesty of her being. Plin. XXXV.9. Timomachus has depicted the raging Aiax, and how he behaved in this outrageous madness Philostr. Lib. II. de vita Apollonii.Cap. 10. Silanion has made the resentful Artist Apollodorus; and as this Apollodorus was a grumpy guy, Silanion did not only cast the Artist himself, but also his stubborn touchiness Plin. XXXIV.8. Protogenes has painted Philiscus, being taken by deep reflections Plin. XXXV.10. Praxiteles has made Phyrne, as if one saw her luxuriant heart bathe in a great see of happiness and lust, Plin. XXXIV.8. Parrhasius made a young man who is walking around in his armour looking for a fight, Plin. ibidem. Philostratus {…} describes a painting to us of a Bacchus who can only be recognized by the heartaches that torture him. These examples illustrate clearly enough, how big a skill the old Masters have had in expressing all sorts of commotions and movements;

Only the citations are mentioned in the Latin edition, but there is no commentary, like in the Dutch and English edition. [MO]

bewegingh · herts-tocht


Quotation

Ghelijck dan de voornaemste kracht der Schilderyen gheleghen is in de bequaeme naeboetsinghe der eyghenschappen diemen in d’onroerende dinghen verneemt, als oock in de levendighe afbeeldinghe der beroeringhen diemen in de roerende dinghen speurt; soo moeten wy het mede daer voor houden, dat de welstandigheyd des gantschen wercks gheoordeelt wordt allermeest in ’t ghebaer ende in ’t roersel der figuren te bestaen, wanneer deselvighe yet merckelicks doen of lijden. Dies plaght oock het levendighe roersel, nae d’eene of d’andere gheleghenheyd der figuren, somtijds Actie somtijds de Passie ghenaemt te worden: Want de Beelden die de kracht van eenig ernstigh bedrijf in haer uyterlick ghebaer uyt-wijsen, worden geseyt een goede Actie te hebben; d’andere daerenteghen die d’inwendige beroeringhen haeres ghemoeds door d’uytwendighe ontseltheyd te kennen geven, worden gheseyt vol van Passie te sijn. Dit vervult de wercken met eenen levendighen gheest, ’t is de rechte ziele der Konste.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Just like the main power of Paintings lies in the capable imitation of the characteristics that one perceives in the unmoving things, as well as in the lively depiction of the movements that one detects in the moving things; as such we have to consider as well, that the harmony of the whole work is thought to exist most of all in the gesture and the movement of the figures, when they do something remarkable or suffer. As such the living movement also tends to be called after one or the other situation of the figures, sometimes Action and sometimes Passion: Because the Images that show the power of a serious occupation in their outward gesture, are said to have a good Action; the other on the other hand who demonstrate the internal movements of their mind by means of an outward dismay, are said to be full of Passion. This fills the works with a lively spirit, it is the true soul of the Art.

Junius explains that there are different types of movement (beroering) in an art work, which he also calls movement (roersel) and gesture (gebaar). On the one hand, he uses the term action (actie), which refers to the outer movement of the figures. On the other hand, there is the passion (passie), which reflects the inner movements. The correct depiction of the different movements should lead to a well-composed whole (welstand). The rest of paragraph IV.2 describes the different emotions, not necessarily in direct relation to art. The phrasing of this paragraph is different in the Latin and English edition. [MO]

ghebaer · roersel · actie · passie · bedrijf · ontsteltheyd



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

De bequaeme uytdruckinghe van d’allerstercte herts-tochten en d’aller beweghelickste beroeringhen plaght maer allenlick uyt een verruckt ende ontroert herte, als uyt eenen levendighen rijcken springh-ader, overvloedighlick uyt te borrelen, en sich over ’t gantsche werck soo krachtighlick uyt te storten, dat d’aenschouwers door ’t soete gheweld van eenen aenghenaemen dwangh even de selvighe beweghinghen in haere herten ghevoelen die den werckende Konstenaer ghevoelt heeft.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] The adequate expression of the strongest passions and the most moving stirrings tend to only spring forth abundantly from an excited and moved heart, as from a lively rich source, and spread itself so powerful over the whole work, that because of the sweet violence of a pleasing force the spectators briefly feel in their hearts the same movements that the working Artist has felt.

herts-tocht


5 quotations

Quotation

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] A complete and ably done Invention has to spring forth from a large and deeply rooted wisdom; no studies should be unknown to us; we have to know all about the whole antiquity together with the countless number of Poetic and Historical tales; yet it is most necessary that we thoroughly understand the manifold movements of the human mind as well as all the special characteristics of it, seen that the great and admired power of these Arts lays most in the lively expression of such commotion. So we understand how the Artists were once judged with a special insight as wise men; seen that one can hardly find one in all the other free Arts, who has to deal more with the help of a high and well-evoked wisdom.

This section is not included in the first Latin edition (1637). [MO]

beroerte


Quotation

Soo gaet het dan vast en wy houden ’t daer voor, dat een fijn en bequaem Konstenaer boven alle dinghen nae een natuyr-kondighe ervaerenheyd behoort te trachten: Niet dat wy hem erghens in een kluyse soecken op te sluyten, om aldaer sijnen kop met verscheyden Geometrische proef-stucken te breken; veel min dat hy ’t ghevoelen van soo veele teghenstrijdighe ghesintheden der naturelicker Philosophen in sijne eenigheyd besighlick soude siften, om daer uyt den rechten aerd van allerley harts-tocht ende beweginghen volmaecktelick te verstaen: Dit en is de meyninghe niet: Want wy het ghenoegh achten dat hy door deen daghelicksche opmerckinghe uytvinde hoe de menighvuldighe gheneghenheden ende beroerten onses ghemoeds ’t gebaer onses aenghesichts dus of soo veranderen ende ontstellen. Elcke beroerte onses ghemoeds, seght Cicero {Lib. III de Oratore}, ontfanght een seker ghelaet van de nature, ’t welck men voor ’t bysondere ende eyghene ghelaet der selvigher beroerte houden magh.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] It is certainly so and we believe that a fine and able Artist should above all aim for an experience of natural things: Not that we intend to lock him up in a vault somewhere, to break his head on different Geometrical tests; even less that he would go through the experience of so many contrasting opinions of the natural Philosophers by himself, in order to perfectly understand the true nature of all sorts of passion and movements: This is not the opinion: Because we think it is enough that he finds out through a daily observation how the manifold situations and commotions of our mind change and startle the gesture of our face. Every commotion of our mind, says Cicero {…}, receives a certain feature from nature, which one may interpret as the special and particular feature of this commotion

Junius elaborates on the amount of knowledge an artist has to acquire on subjects like geometry and philosophy in order to understand passions (hartstocht) and emotions (beweging / beroering). He concludes that a certain experience (ervarenheid) is necessary, rather than an in-depth study. This experience can be acquired by means of a close observation (opmerking) of facial expressions (gelaat) and emotions. [MO]

harts-tocht · beroerte


Quotation

Indien het dan ghebeurt dat hy sich in een gheselschap vindt in ’t welcke eenighe luyden merckelick ontstelt sijn, men soude terstond uyt sijnen aendachtighen ernst afnemen dat hy sulcken gheleghenheyd ghesocht heeft, om uyt d’ooghen der ontstelder mensen de veelvoudighe gedaente van gramschap, liefde, vreese, hope, smaed, vroolickheyd, vertrouwen, en dierghelijcke beweghinghen meer te lesen. Alhoewel nu de Konst-lievende groote Meesters haer meeste werck en studie hier van maeckten, nochtans plaghten sy somwijlen oock een weynigh tijds uyt te splijten om de Zede-konst, de naturelicke Philosophie, verscheyden Historien, Poetische versierselen, als oock de Mathematische wetenschappen te versoecken: Want al ist schoon saecke dat de zede-vormers, de naturelicke Philosophen, de Historie-schrijvers, de Poeten, de mathematijcken mede niet maghtigh sijn een eenigh Schilder te maecken; Nochtans brenght de kennisse deser Konsten soo veele te weghe, dat de Konstenaers die sich op dese wetenschappen redelick wel verstaen voor beter ende volmaeckter Schilders worden ghehouden.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Whenever it happens that he finds himself in a group in which some people are clearly startled, one would immediately believe from his attentive seriousness that he has sought out such a situation, to read from the eyes of the startled peopled the manifold appearance of wrath, love, fear, hope, blame, happiness, trust and such movements. Although the Art-loving great Masters made the most work and study of this, nonetheless they sometimes also tend to free some time to attempt the Art of Virtue, the natural Philosophy, several Histories, Poetical embellishements, as well as the Mathematical sciences: Since although it is clear that the ethics, natural Philosophers, History-writers, Poetes and mathematicians are unable to make any Painter [sic]; nonetheless the knowledge of these Arts brings forth so much, that the Artists who manage quite well in these sciences are thought to be better and more perfect Painters.

This excerpt does not occur in the Latin edition of 1637. [MO]


Quotation

Philostratus heeft den rechten aerd midsgaders oock de waere kracht van de Teycken-konst veele dudydelicker uytghedruckt. Het en maght niet gheloochent werden of de linien, seght hy {Lib. ii. de vita Apollonij. Cap. 10.}, die sonder eenighen verwen-prael maer allen in licht en schaduwe bestaen, verdienen den naem van een Schilderye; vermids wy in de selvighe niet alleen de ghelijckenisse van d’afgebeelde personagien beschouwen, maer oock haere bewegheninghen selver, ’t sy datse door een schroomherighe schaemte ergens afghekeert of door een vrymoedighe voordvaerendheyd ergens tot aenghedreven worden ende alhoewel dese linien op ’t aller eenvoudighste t’saemen ghestelt sijnde de vermenghinghe van ’t bloed als oock de jeughdigheyd van ’t hayr en den baerd in ’t minste niet uyt en drucken, nochtans ghevense ons de volmaeckte ghestaltenis van eenen swarten ofte witten mensche bescheydenlick te kennen.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Philostratus has expressed the true nature as well as the true power of the Art of Drawing much clearer. It may not be denied that the lines, he says {…}, that exist without any splendor of colours but only in light and shadow, deserve the name of Painting; as we see not only the similitude of the depicted persons in it, but also their movements itself, whether that they are averted out of a hesitant shame or are driven towards something by a frank diligence and although these lines that are composed in the most simple way do not express the mixing of blood or the youthfulness of the hair and the beard in any way, nevertheless they modestly illustrate the perfect shape of a black or white man to us.


Quotation

VOor af, dlend aangemerkt te worden, dat het grootste deel dezer bewegingen, niet dan ten deele kunnen begrypelyk zyn, en meest door het vertoonen der oorzaaken hunner beweeging, om der overeenkomst wille, die zy met elkander hebben […] En dus zyn meest alle de geweldige ontroeringen des gemoeds en pynlykheden des lichchaams.

[D'après DE LAIRESSE 1787, p.90:] […] il est difficile, pour ne pas dire impossible, de bien exprimer les fortes passions par le moyen des mouvemens du corps, à cause de l’analogie qu’il y a entre les unes & les autres, soit au commencement ou à la fin de la passion, car il arrive souvent qu’un état de l’ame ou de l’esprit tient médiatement à un autre. […] il en est de même de toutes les émotions violentes de l’ame & de toutes les fortes douleurs du corps […]



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

2 quotations

Quotation

Mais comme les trois premières Parties sont tres-necessaires à tous les Peintres, cette quatriesme, qui regarde l’expression des mouvemens de l’esprit, est excellente par dessus les autres, et tout à fait admirable : car elle ne donne pas seulement la vie aux Figures par la representation de leurs gestes et de leur passions, mais il semble encore qu’elles parlent et qu’elles raisonnent. Et c’est de là principalement qu’on doit juger ce que vaut un Peintre, puisqu’il est certain qu’il se peint luy-mesme dans ses tableaux, qui sont autant de miroir du tempérament de son humeur, et de son génïe.
Il n’y a personne qui ne remarque facilement, en faisant la comparaison des Compositions et des Figures de Raphael à celles de Michelange, que ce premier estoit la douceur mesme ; au lieu que tout au contraire Michelange estoit si rustique, et si mal-plaisant qu’il n’avoit aucun esgard à la bien-séance. Ce qui se void manifestement dans son grand Ouvrage de la Chapelle du Vatican, où, voulant representer le Jugement universel de la fin du monde, sur l’autel mesme de ce Sanctuaire, il a introduit plusieurs figures en des actions extrement indecentes : au lieu qu’il paroist que Raphael a apporté de la modestie dans les Sujets les plus liencieux.
De là nous pouvons conjecturer combien il est important que cette partie de l’Expression, qui est la plus excellente de la Peinture, soit accompagnée d’un jugement, et d’une circonspection particulière ; puisque c’est par elle que l’on connoist la qualité de l’esprit du Peintre
, qui bien loin de s’acquerir de l’honneur par ses Ouvrages, lors qu’il choquera les regles de la bien-seance, sera sans doute blasmé et mesestimé d’un chacun […]



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

4°. L’expression qui consiste à representer naturellement les figures, leurs gestes & leurs passions, doit se faire avec précaution ; c’est-à-dire, que l’on doit dans les sujets que l’on veut peindre, avoir égard à la bien-séance, & ne pas permettre qu’aucune action indécente, & qui puisse blesser la modestie & la pudeur, s’y rencontre.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

Clio De Historyschrijfster [...]wijs ons aen, wat de voornaemste deelen in een Historie zijn. En gy, die de ziele van dedwaelstar Mars zijt, lees ons de lichaemlijke beweegingen, en de teekenen van de lydingen der ziele voor; en deel ons, om yder ding zijn behoorlijke grootsheit, door byvoegselen en zinnebeelden, te geeven, de drift van uwen geest meede!

[BLANC J, 2006, p.165] Indiquez-nous quelles sont les principales parties d'une histoire. Et vous qui êtes l'âme de la planète Mars, rappelez-nous quels sont les mouvements du corps et les signes des passions de l'âme. Et afin que nous donnions à chaque chose la grandeur qui lui convient par le moyen des [ndr: ajouts] et de symboles, partagez avec nous le souffle de votre esprit.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Cangiasio [ndr : Luca Cambiaso] fut le nom de cét Ouvrier habile
Dont le Pinceau fecond ne fut jamais debile :
J’ay veu de grands palais qu’il peignit des deux mains
Sans faire les Cartons, Traçant tous les Desseins
De l’ante du pinceau, et presque sans estude
Son pinceau paroissoit voler de Promptitude,
L’escurial de luy tint les corps renversez,
Bisarres, furieux, l’un sur l’autre entassez,
Luy qui dans ce caprice espouvantable et sombre
Fait un grand pelotton de figures sans nombre.



Other conceptual field(s)

MANIÈRE ET STYLE → le faire et la main
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

[…]  si les Figures naturellement soûtiennnent le Sublime, le Sublime de son costé soûtient merveilleusement les Figures. […] il n’y a point de Figure plus excellente que celle qui est tout-à-fait cachée, & lorsqu’on ne reconnoist point que c’est une Figure. Or il n’y a point de secours ni de remede plus merveilleux pour l’empescher de paroître, que le Sublime & le Pathetique, par ce que l’Art ainsi renfermé au milieu de quelque chose de Grand & d’éclatant, a tout ce qui lui manquoit, & n’est plus suspect d’aucune tromperie. [….] Comment est-ce que l’Orateur a caché la figure dont il se sert ? N’est-il pas aisé de reconnoistre que c’est par l’éclat mesme de sa pensée ? Car comme les moindres lumieres s’évanoüissent, quand le Soleil vient à les éclairer ; de mesme, toutes ces subtilitez de Rhetorique disparoissent à la veüe de cette grandeur qui les environne de tous costés. La mesme chose à peu prés arrive dans la peinture. En effet qu’on tire plusieurs lignes paralleles sur un mesme plan, avec les jours & les ombres : il est certain que ce qui se presentera d’abord à la veuë, ce sera le lumineux, à cause de son grand éclat qui fait qu’il semble sortir hors du tableau, & s’approcher en quelque façon de nous. Ainsi le Sublime & le Pathetique, soit par une affinité naturelle qu’ils ont avec les mouvemens de nostre ame, soit à cause de leur brillant, paroissent davantage, & semblent toucher de plus prés notre esprit que les Figures, dont ils cachent l’art, & qu’ils mettent comme à couvert.

éclatant · lumineux


1 quotations

Quotation

Cangiasio [ndr : Luca Cambiaso] fut le nom de cét Ouvrier habile
Dont le Pinceau fecond ne fut jamais debile :
J’ay veu de grands palais qu’il peignit des deux mains
Sans faire les Cartons, Traçant tous les Desseins
De l’ante du pinceau, et presque sans estude
Son pinceau paroissoit voler de Promptitude,
L’escurial de luy tint les corps renversez,
Bisarres, furieux, l’un sur l’autre entassez,
Luy qui dans ce caprice espouvantable et sombre
Fait un grand pelotton de figures sans nombre.



Other conceptual field(s)

MANIÈRE ET STYLE → le faire et la main
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

4 quotations

Quotation

A l’égard du temperament & des passions, sans doute ils [n.d.r. les sculpteurs antiques] y étoient sujets comme nous : ce ne seroit pas mesme une fort heureuse disposition pour les Arts qu’une insensibilité naturelle : il seroit pas mal-aisé que les Ouvrages ne tinssent un peu de cette extrême froideur : mais du moins ces grands Hommes ne se laisseroient pas tellement prevenir à leurs passions qu’ils n’observassent tout ce qui étoit à fuïr & à pratiquer suivans les divers caracteres de leurs Figures ; & cela avec une telle exactitude, que personne, depuis tant de siecles, n’a encore atteint à ce haut degré de perfection où ils ont poussé leurs Ouvrages.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Pour bien me faire entendre, il faut que je distingue trois choses dans la peinture. La representation des figures, l'expression des passions, & la composition du tout ensemble. Dans la representation des figures je comprens non seulement la juste delineation de leurs contours, mais aussi l'application des vraies couleurs qui leur conviennent. Par l'expression des passions, j'entens les differens caracteres des visages & les diverses attitudes des figures qui marquent ce qu'elles veulent faire, ce qu'elles pensent, en un mot ce qui se passe dans le fond de leur ame. Par la composition du tout ensemble j'entens l'assemblage judicieux de toutes ces figures, placées avec entente, & dégradées de couleur selon l'endroit du plan où elles sont posées. 
Ce que je dis icy d'un tableau où il y a plusieurs figures, se doit entendre aussi d'un tableau où il n'y en a qu'une, parce que les différentes parties de cette figure sont entr'elles ce que plusieurs figures sont les unes à l'égard des autres. Comme ceux qui apprennent à peindre commencent par apprendre à designer le contour des figures, & à le remplir de leurs couleurs naturelles ; qu'ensuite ils s'étudient à donner de belles attitudes à leurs figures & à bien exprimer les passions dont ils veulent qu'elles, paroissent animées, mais que ce n'est qu'après un long-temps qu'ils sçavent ce qu'on doit observer pour bien disposer la composition d'un tableau, pour bien distribuer le clair obscur, & pour bien mettre toutes choses dans les regles de la perspective ; tant pour le trait que pour l’affoiblissement des ombres & des lumieres.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

Quotation

[...] Je ne vous ai point encore parlé de M. Vernet, qui est un de ceux dont j’ai le plus de choses à vous dire. Les Marines sont le principal genre auquel semble s’appliquer cet Auteur, si l’on peut fixer le genre d’un homme qui a autant de talent & de génie. Outre la fraîcheur, la vérité avec laquelle elles sont peintes, il sait encore les animer de figures extrêmement intéressantes & dessinées avec tout le feu & toutes l’expression possible. Les Acteurs qu’il introduit dans ses sujets n’y sont jamais muets ni inutiles. A juger de M. Vernet par cette partie, prise séparément, il peut passer pour un Peintre d’Histoire ; je dis plus, pour très-bon Poëte, tant il excelle à rendre les caracteres, le sentiment & les passions dans toute leur vérité.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

Il me reste à vous parler de nos Peintres de Portraits : les plus illustres sont Mrs. Nattier, Tocqué, Aved, chacun dans un genre différent ; & M. la Tour dans tous les genres. […] Le premier de ces Auteurs est facile, gracieux (je parle de ses ouvrages), brillant, plein d’art ; mais manquant quelquefois de vérité. Le second est plus ferme dans sa touche, plus mâle & plus vigoureux ; mais dur, quelquefois, dans ses caracteres, & point assez varié, ce me semble. Ses portraits ne changent gueres le plus souvent, dans leur attitude, que de gauche à droite ou de droite à gauche. M. Aved plus monotone encore que ce second, est beaucoup plus froid ; mais sa simplicité a une sorte de mérite ; & cet Auteur est assez heureux pour les ressemblances. Quant à M. la Tour, c’est un Protée, dont l’art se montre sous toutes les formes imaginables : tantôt sévere, tantôt enjoué ; tantôt facile, tantôt plus réfléchi ; ici noble & majestueux, là piquant, vif & spirituel : ses Portraits, pour quelqu’un qui sait lire dans la nature, sont autant de caracteres […].



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

SECT. II. Of the Passions or Complexions.
Man’s Body is composed of the Four Elements.
Melancholly resembles Earth.
Flegm the Water.
Choler the Fire.
Bloud the Air ; and answerable are the Gestures and Humours.
Melancholly bodies are slow, heavy, and restrained ; and the consequents are anxiety, disquietness, sadness, stubborness, &c. in which horror and despair will appear.
Flegmatick bodies are simple, humble, merciful.
Sanguine bodies are temperate, modest, gracious, princely, gentle, and merry ; to whom these affections of the mind best agree, viz. love, delight, pleasure, desire, mirth, and hope.
Cholerick bodies are violent, boisterous, arrogant, bold, and fierce ; to whom these passions appertain, anger, hatred, and boldness ; and accordingly the skillful Artist expresses the motions of these several bodies, which ought Philosophically to be understood.


1 quotations

Quotation

L'on remarqua pour la fin, qu'il n'est pas possible, de prescrire precisement toutes les marques des differentes passions, à cause de la diversité, de la forme, & du temperament : [...] qu'ainsi le Peintre doit avoir égard à toutes ces differences, pour conformer les expressions passions au caractere des figures, à la proportion & aux contours.
L'on rapporta à ce propos, ce que quelques naturalistes ont écrit de la physionomie, à sçavoir, que les affections de l'ame suivent le temperament du corps, & que les marques exterieures sont des signes certains des affections de l'ame [...] 

Comme de nombreuses autres parties de texte, ce passage de Testelin est en partie repris par Florent Le Comte dans son Cabinet des singularitez (...), plus précisément aux pages 44-45 de son édition de 1699-1700 (Paris, Etienne Picart & Nicolas Le Clerc).



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

1 quotations

Quotation

Are. Aussi Timante un des excellents peintres de l’antiquité, qui peignit Iphigenie fille d’Agamemnon, dont Euripide fit la belle tragedie, depuis peu traduite par le Dolce, & representée à Venise il y a quelques années ; la peignit, dis je, avant l’autel, ou elle attendoit d’etre immolée, & sacrifiée à Diane ; & aiant epuisé toutes les expressions de douleur sur le visage des spectateurs, & ne s’imaginant pas d’en pouvoir exprimer de plus forte sur le visage de ce pere affligé, il le fit qui se couvroit d’un linge, ou d’un bout de son habit : que Timante conserva bien la convenance, parcequ’Agamemnon etant pere, il sembloit encore qu’il ne devoit pas supporter de voir immoler sa fille à ses yeux.
Fab. Ce fut la, un accident bien trouvé.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

1 quotations

Quotation

Les Peintres & les Poëtes excitent en nous ces passions artificielles, en nous présentant les imitations des objets capables d'exciter en nous des passions veritables.
Comme l'impression que ces imitations font sur nous est du même genre que l'impression que l'objet imité par le Peintre ou par le Poëte feroit sur nous : comme l'impression que l'imitation fait n'est differente de l'impression que l'objet imité feroit, qu'en ce qu'elle est moins forte, elle doit exciter dans notre ame une passion qui ressemble à celle que l'objet imité y auroit pu exciter. La copie de l'objet doit, pour ainsi dire, exciter en nous une copie de la passion que l'objet y auroit excitée. Mais comme l'impression que l'imitation fait n'est pas aussi profonde que l'impression que l'objet même auroit faite ; comme l'impression faite par l'imitation n'est pas serieuse, d'autant qu'elle ne va point jusqu'à l'ame pour laquelle il n'y a pas d'illusion dans ces sensations, ainsi que nous l'expliquerons tantôt plus au long ; enfin comme l'impression faite par l'imitation n'affecte que l'ame sensitive, elle s'efface bientôt. Cette impression superficielle faite par une imitation, disparoît sans avoir des suites durables, comme en auroit une impression faite par l'objet même que le Peintre ou le Poëte ont imité.
On conçoit facilement la raison de la difference qui se trouve entre l'impression faite par l'objet même & l'impression faite par l'imitation. L'imitation la plus parfaite n'a qu'un être artificiel, elle n'a qu'une vie empruntée, au lieu que la force & l'activité de la nature se trouve dans l'objet imité. C'est en vertu du pouvoir qu'il tient de la nature même que l'objet réel agit sur nous.

imitation



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

3 quotations

Quotation

Prens garde toutes-fois que par l’Anatomie
Tels Corps ne soient pas trop secs en ton Academie ;
Fay chois d’un beau Modelle, et pour le mouvement,
Mets l’Acte avec ardeur, et par fois mollement,
Selon la passion qui dans le Corps domine
Changeant suivant le temps, l’âge, le poil, la mine.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

L'on dit que ce que l'on appelloit action en cet endroit, n'étoit autre chose que le mouvement de quelque partie, & que ce mouvement ne se faisoit que par le changement des muscles, [...] ; ainsi le muscle qui agit le plus reçoit le plus d'esprits, & par consequent devient enflé plus que les autres.
[...] L'on remarqua qu'encore qu'on puisse representer les passions de l'ame par les actions de tout le Corps, neanmoins que c'étoit au visage où les marques s'y faisoient le plus connoître, & non seulement dans les yeux comme quelques-uns l'ont crû, mais principalement en la forme & aux mouvements des sourcils ; que comme il y a deux appetits dans la partie sensitive de l'ame, il y a aussi deux mouvemens qui y ont un parfait rapport, les uns s'élevent au cerveau & les autres inclinent vers le coeur.

Cette définition correspond à celle donnée par Le Brun et que l’on retrouve dans sa Conférence de M. Le Brun, (...) sur l'expression générale et particulière (...) éditée en 1698, précisément à partir de la page 4 (et suivantes). Par ailleurs, une partie de ce passage de Testelin est repris par Florent Le Comte dans son Cabinet des singularitez (...), plus précisément aux pages 43-44 de son édition de 1699-1700 (Paris, Etienne Picart & Nicolas Le Clerc, tome I, vol. I).



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

[…] Voilà quels sont les santimens des anciens Phisionomes, lesquels étendent leurs observations sur toutes les parties du corps & même sur la couleur. 
Mais il est plus apropos de se réduire à ce qui peut estre necessaire aux Peintres, car quoi qu’on dise que le geste de tout le
corps soit un des plus considerables signes, qui marquent la disposition de l’Esprit, l’on peut néanmoins s’arêter aux signes qui se rencontrent en la teste, suivant ce que dit Apulé, que l’homme se montre tout entier en sa teste & qu’à la verité si l’homme est dit le racourci du Monde entier, la teste peut bien estre dire le raccourci de tout son corps, que les animaux sont autant differens dans leurs inclinations, comme les hommes le sont dans leurs affections. Il faut donc premiérement observer les inclinations, que chaque animal a dans sa propre espece, ensuite chercher dans leur Physionomie les parties qui marquent singulierement certaines affections dominantes, par exemple les pourceaux sont sales, lubriques, gourmands & paresseux. Or l’on doit remarquer quelle partie marque la gourmandise, la lubricité & la paresse, parce que quelque homme pourroit avoir des parties ressemblantes à celle d’un pourceau qui n’auroit pas les autres, & ainsi il faut sçavoir premierement quelles parties sont affectées à certaines inclinations. En second lieu la ressemblance & le raport des parties de la face humaine avec celle des animaux, & enfin reconnoître le signe qui change tous les autres, & augmente ou diminuë leur force & leur vertu, ce qui ne se peut faire entendre que par demonstration de figure. […]



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

1 quotations

Quotation

Il est deux sortes de vrai-semblance en Peinture, la vrai-semblance poëtique & la vrai-semblance mécanique. La vrai-semblance mécanique consiste à ne rien représenter qui ne soit possible, suivant les loix de la statique, les loix du mouvement, & les loix de l'optique.
Cette vrai-semblance mécanique consiste donc à ne point donner à une lumiere d'autres effets que ceux qu'elle auroit dans la nature : par exemple à ne lui point faire éclairer les corps sur lesquels d'autres corps interposez l'empêchent de tomber. Elle consiste à ne point s'éloigner sensiblement de la proportion naturelle des corps ; à ne point leur donner plus de force qu'il est vrai-semblable qu'ils en puissent avoir. Un Peintre pécheroit contre ces loix, s'il faisoit lever par un homme qui seroit mis dans une attitude, laquelle ne lui laisseroit que la moitié de ses forces, un fardeau qu'un homme, qui peut faire usage de toutes ses forces, auroit peine à ébranler. [...] Je ne parlerai point plus au long de la vrai-semblance mécanique, parce qu'on en trouve des regles très-detaillées dans les livres qui traitent de l'Art de la Peinture.
La vrai-semblance poëtique consiste à donner à ses personnages les passions qui leur conviennent suivant leur âge, leur dignité, suivant le temperament qu'on leur prête, & l'interêt qu'on leur fait prendre dans l'action. Elle consiste à observer dans son tableau ce que les italiens appellent il
Costumé ; c'est-à-dire à s'y conformer à ce que nous sçavons des mœurs, des habits, des bâtimens & des armes particulieres des peuples qu'on veut représenter. La vrai-semblance poëtique consiste enfin à donner aux personnages d'un tableau leur tête & leur caractere connu, quand ils en ont un, soit que ce caractere ait été pris sur des portraits, soit qu'il ait été imaginé.
 



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

1 quotations

1 quotations

Quotation

Clio De Historyschrijfster. [...]
DE trotse Clio port iet heerlijx aen te slaen./Zy leert een rijke stoff, waer in de geest kan speelen,/Wat was of oit gebeurde, op 't zinrijkst te verbeelen;/En in wat deelen dat een konststuk moet bestaen./Hoe dat, wanneer m' een daedt op 't naeuwst heeft overwogen,/ Men yder landaert elk Persoon na zijn beslach/Heeft uit te drukken: en, zoo veel de kunst vermagh,/Elx lijding, yders doen moet toonen als voor oogen./Zy stelt de beelden als op een Toneel ten toon,/En steekt uit Gloryzucht d' Aeloutheit nae de Kroon./

[BLANC J, 2006, p.163] Clio, l'Historienne, [...] La fière Clio pousse à entreprendre de nobles choses. /Elle livre une riche matière où l'esprit peut s'amuser/ A représenter de la façon la plus signifiante ce qui fut ou advint autrefois. /Elle enseigne les parties en lesquelles doit consister une oeuvre d'art;/ Comment, après avoir envisagé très précisément une action, /Il faut exprimer la nationalité de chaque personnage de façon appropriée;/ Et, autant que l'art le permet, de quelle manière il faut exprimer les passions / Et l'attitude de chacun comme si on les présentait devant les yeux./ Elle montre les figures comme sur la scène d'un théâtre, / Et conteste par son ambition la couronne à l'Antiquité.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → groupe
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire

1 quotations

Quotation

Ce que les Italiens apellent Costume & Decore, qui sont des termes dont on se sert en parlant de la convenance, ne consiste pas dans les sentimens de la morale, que la peinture ne peut directement exprimer. Mais dans les actions exterieures, qui ont du raport à la condition, & à la dignité des personnes, qu’on doit toujours reconnoître dans leurs manieres. […] Il paroît, ce Decore, dans la Peinture par plusieurs circonstances exterieures que le Peintre observe dans les figures, à l’égard des cheveux, des habits, de la couleur, de l’Atitude, du geste, & de l’expression : Choses qui dependent d’un grand savoir, & d’un profond jugement.

convenance



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’ARTISTE → qualités

1 quotations

Quotation

In that admirable Carton of S. Paul preaching, the Expressions are very just, and delicate throughout : Even the Back-Ground is not without its Meaning ; ‘tis Expressive of the Superstition S. Paul was preaching against.


2 quotations

Quotation

Cependant il n'est pas raisonnable de passer ici sous silence les prérogatives du Dessein dont les principales sont : 1°. Qu’il sert à faire beaucoup de choses utiles tout seul, avant la jonction du coloris. Ce qui fait qu’une infinité de personnes se contentent d’avoir quelque habitude du Dessein sans se soucier du coloris. 2°. Qu’il donne un goût pour la connoissance des Arts, & pour en faire juger du moins jusqu’à un certain point. Ce qui oblige de regarder cette partie comme nécessaire à l’éducation des jeunes Gentilshommes à qui on donne ordinairement des Maîtres à dessiner, comme on en donne pour écrire. 3°. Que cette partie qui en contient plusieurs autres considerables, comme la connoissance des muscles exterieurs, la perspective, la position des attitudes, les expressions des passions de l’ame, pourroit être par consequent considerée comme un tout, plutôt que comme une partie séparée.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition du dessin
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
EFFET PICTURAL → perspective

Quotation

Il n’en est pas de même du Dessein & du Coloris ; l’un & l’autre exigent une infinité de connoissance, & une étude opiniâtrée. Le Dessein demande un exercice qui produise une si grande justesse de la vûe pour connoître les differentes dimentions des objets visibles, & une si grande habitude pour en former les contours, que le Compas, comme disoit Michel-Ange, doit être plutôt dans les yeux que dans les mains.
Le Dessein suppose la science du corps humain, non-seulement, comme il se voit ordinairement : mais comme il doit être pour être parfait, & selon la premiere intention de la nature. Il est fondé sur la connoissance de l’Anatomie, & sur des proportions tantôt fortes & robustes, & tantôt délicates & élegantes, selon qu’elles conviennent aux âges, aux sexes, & aux conditions differentes : & cela seul demande des études & des reflexions de beaucoup d’années.
Ce même Dessein oblige encore le Peintre à posseder parfaitement la Geométrie pour pratiquer exactement la Perspective, dont il a un besoin indispensable dans toutes ses opérations. Il exige une habitude des racourcis & des contours dont la varieté est aussi grande que le nombre des attitudes est infini.
Enfin le Dessein renferme encore la connoissance de la Physionomie & l'expression des passions de l'ame, partie si nécessaire & si estimable dans la Peinture.



Other conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition du dessin
EFFET PICTURAL → perspective
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion

3 quotations

Quotation

Les passions de l'ame, reprit Philarque, s'expriment par les mouvemens, non seulement des parties du visage, mais encore de celles du corps : Et de toutes les passions il y en a de violentes, il y en a de douces. Les violentes sont beaucoup moins difficiles à exprimer, & Rubens y a reüssi autant bien que Peintre qui l'ait precedé. Mais pour les expressions douces, soit qu'elles paroissent comme un effet de la tranquillité de l'âme, ou qu'elles soient de ces sortes de passions qui causant peu de changement sur le visage, ne laissent pas de faire voir que le dedans est fort agité, c'est où Rubens a merveilleusement bien reüssi : il y en a une infinité d'exemples dans ses Ouvrages.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

Ce n'est pas assez que les passions de l'ame soient naturelles, il faut encore que la mesme passion soit différente dans la diversité des sujets & des figures.


Quotation

i l'on regarde avec quel soin on a fait tendre toutes choses à un seul but, rien n'est de plus lié, de plus reuni, & de plus un, si cela se peut dire, que la representation de cette histoire ; & rien en même temps n'est plus divers & plus varié si l'on considère les différentes attitudes des personnages, & les expressions particulieres de leurs passions. Tout ne va qu'à representer l'étonnement, l'admiration, la surprise & la crainte que cause l'arrivée du plus celebre Conquerant de la Terre, & si ces passions qui n'ont toutes qu'un mesme objet le trouvent différemment exprimées dans les diverses personnes qui les ressentent. La Mere de Darius abbatuë sous le poids de sa douleur & de son âge, [...]. [...] D'ailleurs quelle beauté & quelle diversité dans les airs de teste de ce tableau [ndr : La tente de Darius de Le Brun] ; ils sont tous grands, tous nobles, & si cela se peut dire, tous heroïques en leur maniere, de mesme que les vestemens, que le Peintre a recherchez avec un soin & une étude inconcevable. Dans le tableau des Pelerins toutes les testes & toutes les draperies, hors celles du Christ & des deux disciples qui ont quelque noblesse ; sont prises sur des hommes & des femmes de la connoissance du Peintre, ce qui avilit extremement la composition de ce tableau, & fait un mélange aussi mal assorti, que si dans une Tragedie des plus sublimes on mesloit quelques Scenes d'un stile bas & comique.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Clio De Historyschrijfster. [...]
DE trotse Clio port iet heerlijx aen te slaen./Zy leert een rijke stoff, waer in de geest kan speelen,/Wat was of oit gebeurde, op 't zinrijkst te verbeelen;/En in wat deelen dat een konststuk moet bestaen./Hoe dat, wanneer m' een daedt op 't naeuwst heeft overwogen,/ Men yder landaert elk Persoon na zijn beslach/Heeft uit te drukken: en, zoo veel de kunst vermagh,/Elx lijding, yders doen moet toonen als voor oogen./Zy stelt de beelden als op een Toneel ten toon,/En steekt uit Gloryzucht d' Aeloutheit nae de Kroon./

[BLANC J, 2006, p. 163] Clio, l'Historienne, [...] La fière Clio pousse à entreprendre de nobles choses. /Elle livre une riche matière où l'esprit peut s'amuser/ A représenter de la façon la plus signifiante ce qui fut ou advint autrefois. /Elle enseigne les parties en lesquelles doit consister une oeuvre d'art;/ Comment, après avoir envisagé très précisément une action, /Il faut exprimer la nationalité de chaque personnage de façon appropriée;/ Et, autant que l'art le permet, de quelle manière il faut exprimer les passions / Et l'attitude de chacun comme si on les présentait devant les yeux./ Elle montre les figures comme sur la scène d'un théâtre, / [...]



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → groupe
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire

2 quotations

Quotation

{Des Nudités}
Lors qu’il [ndr : Nicolas Poussin] fait des Vénus nos sens sont interdits :
Par le raport des yeux il charme nos esprits,
Une vertu secrette incontinent enflame
Le sang plus espuré qui sert de loge à l’ame.
Que si ses nudités causent l’émotion,
Il nous porte d’ailleurs à la devotion,

Et le mesme lien qu’il employe au martyre,
Nous esloignant du monde, au firmament nous tire.
{Des Tableaux de Devotion.}
S’il represente un Christ environné de Juifs,
Les secrets mouvemens d’une telle peinture
Portent dans nostre sein une saincte pointure 



Other conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Quotation

Cette émotion naturelle qui s'excite en nous machinalement, quand nous voïons nos semblables dans le danger ou dans le malheur, n'a d'autre attrait que celui d'être une passion dont les mouvemens remuënt l'ame & la tiennent occupée ; cependant cette émotion a des charmes capables de la faire rechercher malgré les idées tristes & importunes qui l'accompagnent & qui la suivent.



Other conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

26 quotations

Quotation

Mais comme les trois premières Parties sont tres-necessaires à tous les Peintres, cette quatriesme, qui regarde l’expression des mouvemens de l’esprit, est excellente par dessus les autres, et tout à fait admirable : car elle ne donne pas seulement la vie aux Figures par la representation de leurs gestes et de leur passions, mais il semble encore qu’elles parlent et qu’elles raisonnent. Et c’est de là principalement qu’on doit juger ce que vaut un Peintre, puisqu’il est certain qu’il se peint luy-mesme dans ses tableaux, qui sont autant de miroir du tempérament de son humeur, et de son génïe.
Il n’y a personne qui ne remarque facilement, en faisant la comparaison des Compositions et des Figures de Raphael à celles de Michelange, que ce premier estoit la douceur mesme ; au lieu que tout au contraire Michelange estoit si rustique, et si mal-plaisant qu’il n’avoit aucun esgard à la bien-séance. Ce qui se void manifestement dans son grand Ouvrage de la Chapelle du Vatican, où, voulant representer le Jugement universel de la fin du monde, sur l’autel mesme de ce Sanctuaire, il a introduit plusieurs figures en des actions extrement indecentes : au lieu qu’il paroist que Raphael a apporté de la modestie dans les Sujets les plus liencieux.
De là nous pouvons conjecturer combien il est important que cette partie de l’Expression, qui est la plus excellente de la Peinture, soit accompagnée d’un jugement, et d’une circonspection particulière ; puisque c’est par elle que l’on connoist la qualité de l’esprit du Peintre
, qui bien loin de s’acquerir de l’honneur par ses Ouvrages, lors qu’il choquera les regles de la bien-seance, sera sans doute blasmé et mesestimé d’un chacun […]



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Et comme ce mot n’est pas un Terme particulierement affecté à la Peinture, mais qu’il est aussi commun aux Poëtes et aux Historiens, qui disent les mesmes choses que les Peintres ont accoustumé de representer ; je ne dois pas imputer seulement aux Peintres de nostre Nation, tout le reproche de n‘avoir pas encore donné de nom à cette excellente Partie de l’Art ; d’où il semble qu’on peut inférer qu’elle n’est donc pas conneüe ny pratiquée par eux. Il sera toûjours plus apropos et plus utile d’en expliquer le mystère, et de faire concevoir la force et la vraye intelligence de ce Costûme, qui est proprement à dire un Stile sçavant, une expression judicieuse, une Convenance particulière et spécifique à chaque figure du Sujet qu’on traitte : de sorte que ce mot bien entendu comprend, et veut dire tant de choses essentielles à nostre propos qu’il ne peut estre trop examiné ny trop expliqué.


Quotation

Voilà en quoy consiste le dessein : c’est luy qui marque exactement toutes les parties du corps humain, qui découvre ce qu’un Peintre sçait dans la science des os, des muscles, & des veines ; c’est luy qui donne la ponderation aux corps pour les mettre en équilibre, & empescher qu’il ne semblent tomber, & ne pas se soustenir sur leur centre ; c’est luy qui fait paroistre dans les bras, dans les jambes, & dans les autres parties, plus ou moins d’effort, selon les actions plus fortes ou plus foibles qu’ils doivent faire ou souffrir ; c’est luy qui marque sur les traits du visage toutes ces differentes expressions qui découvrent les inclinations & les passions de l’ame ; c’est enfin luy qui sçait disposer les vestemens, & placer toutes les choses qui entrent dans une grande ordonnance, avec cette symmetrie, cette belle entente, & cét Art merveilleux, que l’on admire dans les travaux des plus grands hommes, sans que les couleurs mesmes soient necessaires pour faire comprendre ce qu’ils ont voulu representer.


Quotation

Pour les figures, rien ne doit se ressembler moins dans un Tableau que les airs de teste, parce que l'on n'a jamais veu deux personnes qui se ressemblent parfaitement, & c'est en cela plus qu'en toute autre chose qu'on reconnoist la variété de la Nature. Si l'on est diffèrent dans les traits du visage, à plus forte raison lorsqu'il est agité par quelque passion de l'ame, puisque quand mesme deux personnes se ressembleroient dans leurs traits, la Nature aime tant la diversité, qu'ils ne se ressembleroient pas pour cela dans leurs expressions.


Quotation

Quand vous parlez d’expressions, interrompit Pymandre, n’entendez-vous pas les passions de l’ame qui paroissent sur le visage, & que le Peintre represente selon la nature du sujet qu’il traite.
Le mot d’expression en general, repartis-je, se doit prendre dans la Peinture, aussi bien qu’en toute autre chose pour la veritable & naturelle representation de ce que l’on veut faire voir & donner à connoistre. Ainsi l’expression s’estend à traiter une histoire dans toutes les circonstances qu’elle demande pour instruire ; à representer un corps avec toutes ses parties dans l’action qui luy est convenable ; à voir sur le visage les passions necessaires aux figures que l’on peint. Et comme c’est sur le visage que l’on connoist mieux les affections de l’ame, on se sert ordinairement du mot expression pour signifier les passions que l’on veut exprimer.
Ce sont, dit Pymandre, ces differentes images de nos passions qui sont difficiles à bien representer, & en quoy tous les Peintres n’ont pas également reussi.
Raphaël, répondis-je, a esté sans doute un des plus sçavans dans cette partie.

passion · affection



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

[...] mon Maistre me fist remarquer bien d’autres beautés que celles que les Cabalistes admirent dans les ouvrages de leurs Chefs : Car outre qu’il n’y manquoit rien de celles-là qui ne regardent que la pratique de l’Art, il m’y fist découvrir tant de science & d’étude, qu’il est presque aussi difficile de les exprimer, que de les imiter, à moins que d’avoir les mêmes connoissances desquelles ces rares Esprits se servoient, pour faire de si excellens Ouvrages.
            Il ne me parla point de la
Vaguesse du Coloris, de la Morbidesse des Carnations, de la Franchise du Pinceau, ny des autres termes extravagans à la mode de nos Cabalistes ; mais bien de la beauté, diversité, netteté & sublimité des pensées, de cette manière noble & majestueuse de traiter un sujet, de la discretion à le remplir dignement & convenablement à la verité de l’Histoire qu’il represente, & au Mode dans lequel il se rencontre ; de l’exacte & sçavante observation du Costume, dans laquelle ces anciens Maistres faisoient consister tout ce que la Peinture a d’ingenieux & de sublime ; de cette pointe d’esprit & de cet excellent genie, qu’ils faisoient paroistre dans leurs Ouvrages, dont les Ecrivains les ont loüés si hautement : De là suivoit la judicieuse & convenable disposition des lieux & des figures, la force & la diversité des expressions, l’élégance & le beau choix des attitudes, la diligence & l’exactitudes dans le dessein, la beauté & la variété des proportions, la position aisée & naturelle des figures sur leur centre de gravité ou équilibre, & conformément aux regles de la Perspective des Plans, qui est le lien & le soûtien de toutes les beautés de la Peinture, & sans laquelle elle n’est qu’une pure barboüillerie de Couleurs ; mais sur tout, cet agrément & cette grace admirable dans les mouvemens, qui est un talent autant rare qu’il est precieux.
            On pouvoit encore admirer la lumiere bien choisie, & répanduë avec discretion sur les objets, selon leur proximité ou éloignement de l’œil, & les accidens du lumineux, du Diaphane & du corps éclairé ; les differens effets des lumieres primitives & derivatives, l’amitié & la charmante harmonie (pour ainsi dire) des Couleurs, par leur degrés proportionnés de force ou d’afoiblissement, suivant les regles de la Perspective aërienne, ou par leur sympatie naturelle : Enfin, cette Eurithmie dans toutes les parties de l’Ouvrage, auquel elle donne son prix & sa valeur.
            Voilà une partie des veritables & solides beautés, que mon Maistre me fist observer dans les admirables Ouvrages de ces grands Hommes, qui ont charmé toute l’Antiquité, & dont le seul recit charme encor tous ceux qui l’entendent.


Quotation

Par la vivacité dont il [ndr : Poussin] parle, il entend cette vie & cette forte expression qu’il a si bien sceû donner à ses figures, quand il a voulu representer les divers mouvemens du corps, & les differentes passions de l’ame. Il faudroit trop de temps pour parcourir les principaux ouvrages où il a fait voir son grand sçavoir dans cette partie. Trouve-t-on ailleurs des expressions de douleur, de tristesse, de joye & d’admiration plus belles, plus fortes & plus naturelles que celles qui se voyent dans ce merveilleux Tableau de Saint François Xavier qui est au Noviciat des Jésuites ? Dans les deux Tableaux du frapement de roche combien de differentes actions noblement representées! On peut encore dans ces mesmes tableaux remarquer ce qu’il dit du costume, c’est à dire, ce qui regarde la convenance dans toutes les choses qui doivent accompagner une histoire. C’est en quoy l’on peut dire qu’il a surpassé tous les autres Peintres, & qu’il s’est distingué d’une maniere qui est d’autant plus considerable, que dans le temps qu’elle fait voir la science de l’ouvrier, elle divertit par la nouveauté, & enseigne une infinité de choses qui satisfont l’esprit, & plaisent à la veûë.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Pour bien me faire entendre, il faut que je distingue trois choses dans la peinture. La representation des figures, l'expression des passions, & la composition du tout ensemble. Dans la representation des figures je comprens non seulement la juste delineation de leurs contours, mais aussi l'application des vraies couleurs qui leur conviennent. Par l'expression des passions, j'entens les differens caracteres des visages & les diverses attitudes des figures qui marquent ce qu'elles veulent faire, ce qu'elles pensent, en un mot ce qui se passe dans le fond de leur ame. Par la composition du tout ensemble j'entens l'assemblage judicieux de toutes ces figures, placées avec entente, & dégradées de couleur selon l'endroit du plan où elles sont posées. 
Ce que je dis icy d'un tableau où il y a plusieurs figures, se doit entendre aussi d'un tableau où il n'y en a qu'une, parce que les différentes parties de cette figure sont entr'elles ce que plusieurs figures sont les unes à l'égard des autres. Comme ceux qui apprennent à peindre commencent par apprendre à designer le contour des figures, & à le remplir de leurs couleurs naturelles ; qu'ensuite ils s'étudient à donner de belles attitudes à leurs figures & à bien exprimer les passions dont ils veulent qu'elles, paroissent animées, mais que ce n'est qu'après un long-temps qu'ils sçavent ce qu'on doit observer pour bien disposer la composition d'un tableau, pour bien distribuer le clair obscur, & pour bien mettre toutes choses dans les regles de la perspective ; tant pour le trait que pour l’affoiblissement des ombres & des lumieres.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Je croy, interompit Pymandre, qu’en effet un Peintre ne doit pas ignorer la Phisionomie pour bien connoistre & bien peindre les differentes inclinations des hommes.
Cela est vray, répondis-je, si celuy qui peint veut donner une parfaite expression à ses visages, bien marquer leur temperament, & representer mesme jusques aux pensées qui peuvent les occuper. Mais ce n’est pas de cette maniere sçavante que le Fevre traitoit ses ouvrages ; cette force d’expressions où l’on voit un veritable caractere des passions & du naturel des hommes ne se rencontroit pas dans tous les sujets qu’il representoit.


Quotation

Il y a plusieurs choses à considérer dans l’Invention, savoir l’action & le mouvement, qu’on apelle aussi le feu, l’expression & quelqu’autres, je ne sai quoi que les Italiens apellent fierté, furie, terribilité : Et enfin la douceur et la grace.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Quant à l’Expression & à la fierté, elles resultent du concours de toutes les parties d’une figure, particulièrement du visage, des mains & enfin de tous les membres, pour exprimer une passion, le mouvement intérieur, & l’état où se trouve le corps qu’on represente dans un Tableau, ou dans un Dessein. En éfet ce sont les diverses situations de ces parties qui expriment nos volontés avec autant d’énergie que la parole.

mouvement intérieur · passion · situation



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Toutes les figures doivent donc agir conformement au sujet, & marquer une passion qui lui soit propre […]
Un’ordonnance reçoit assez d’expressions differentes & contraires, pourveu qu’elles servent au sujet : Mais elle ne peut soufrir des figures qui ne concourent point à l’action principale, & qui semblent conserver le sang froid, à ce point qu’elles ne prennent pas garde à ce qui se passe.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

dans un endroit où il [ndr : Testelin] traite de L’EXPRESSION, vous verrez que le sens de ce qui est dit à ce sujet, est que « le Peintre se doit attacher aux caracteres qui conviennent à l’idée du sujet, & négliger les circonstances qui n’y sont pas absolument necessaires ; qu’il doit être aussi fidèle en ses representations, que l’Historien dans ce qu’il expose ; il faut que leurs expressions soient sublimes par la noblesse du genie qui les y éleve, & tous deux doivent être tres-jalous de la pureté, & verité des Histoires sacrées, puisque la Peinture doit instruire l’esprit aussi-bien que le divertir dans le même moment.

Comme de nombreuses autres parties de texte, ce passage de Florent Le Comte est tiré de l'ouvrage "Les Sentimens (...)" de Testelin, plus précisément aux pages 19 et 21 de l'édition de La Haye (Matthieu Rogguet, vers 1693-1694). Il s'agit ici d'un des seuls extraits où Testelin est cité explicitement.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

Les Anciens n’ont-ils pas attribué deux appetits à la partie sensitive de l’ame, rangeant dans le CONCUPISCIBLE, les passions simples & dans l’IRASCIBLE les plus farouches, celles qui sont composées, pretendant que l’amour, la haine, le desir, la joye & la tristesse sont renfermées dans le premier, & que la crainte, la hardiesse, l’esperance, le desespoir, la colere, & la peur resident dans l’autre ; cela peut être expliqué plus au long. On conclut qu’il est impossible de prescrire precisément toutes les marques des differentes passions, à cause de la diversité de la forme, & du temperamment ; qu’un visage plein ne forme pas les mêmes plis, que celui qui sera maigre & desseiché […]. Qu’ainsi le Peintre doit avoir égard à toutes ces differences, pour conformer les expressions des passions au caractere des figures, à la proportion & aux contours.

Comme de nombreuses autres parties de texte, ce passage de Florent Le Comte est tiré de l'ouvrage "Les Sentimens (...)" de Testelin, plus précisément à la page 24 de l'édition de La Haye (Matthieu Rogguet, vers 1693-1694).


Quotation

Quant aux MOUVEMENS & à l’EXPRESSION, cette quatrième partie est excellente & admirable ; car elle fait parler les figures ; & il est à remarquer que le Peintre se peint souvent lui-même, faisant porter à ses figures le caractere de son humeur, de son imagination, & de son genie ; car dans le paralelle des figures de RAPHAEL avec celles de MICHEL-ANGE, on reconnoîtra que le premier étoit la douceur même, & que l’autre étoit extraordinairement rude & severe ; comme il se voit dans son ouvrage de la Chapelle du Vatican, & dans le Jugement universel qu’il a representé dans ce sanctuaire, où il a introduit plusieurs figures extravagantes par leur indecence, lorsque RAPHAEL au contraire a apporté de la moderation dans les sujets les plus licentieux.
Il faut encore que l’expression soit accompagnée d’un jugement & d’une circonspection particuliere, pour ne rien faire que de modeste & de régulier dans tous ses ouvrages ; prenant pour maxime que rien ne peut être beau s’il n’est honnête.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

L’Expression, à mon avis, est une naïve & naturelle ressemblance des choses que l’on a à représenter : Elle est necessaire & entre dans toutes les parties de la Peinture, & un Tableau ne sçauroit être parfait sans l’Expression ; c’est elle qui marque les veritables caracteres de chaque chose ; c’est par elle que l’on distingue la nature des corps ; que des figures semblent avoir du mouvement, & tout ce qui est feint paroît être vrai. 
Elle est aussi bien dans la couleur que dans le dessein ; elle doit encore être dans la representation des païsages, & dans l’assemblage des figures. 
C’est, MESSIEURS, ce que j’ai tâché de vous faire remarquer dans les Conferences passées ; aujourd’hui j’essaierai de vous faire voir que l’Expression est aussi une partie qui marque les mouvemens de l’Ame, ce qui rend visible les effets de la passion.


Quotation

Et comme nous avons dit que la glande qui est au milieu du cerveau, est le lieu où l’Ame reçoit les images des passions, le sourcil est la partie de tout le visage où les passions se font mieux connoître, quoique plusieurs aient pensé que ce soit dans les yeux. Il est vrai que la prunelle par son feu & son mouvement fait bien voir l’agitation de l’Ame, mais elle ne fait pas connoître de quelle nature est cette agitation. La bouche & le nez ont beaucoup de part à l’expression, mais pour l’ordinaire ces parties ne servent qu’à suivre les mouvemens du cœur, comme nous le marquerons dans la suite de cét entretien.


Quotation

Voila, MESSIEURS, une partie des mouvemens exterieurs que j’ai remarqués sur le visage. 
Mais comme nous avons dit dans le commencement de ce discours, que les autres parties du corps peuvent servir à l’expression, il sera bon d’en dire quelque chose en passant. 
Si l’Admiration n’apporte pas grand changement dans le visage, elle ne produit guéres d’agitation dans les autres parties du corps, & ce premier mouvement peut se representer par une personne droite, aiant les deux mains ouvertes, les bras approchans un peu du corps, les pieds l’un contre l’autre, & les genoux ploiés. 
Dans la Veneration le corps sera encore plus courbé que l’Estime, les bras & les mains seront presque joints, les genoux iront en terre, & toutes les parties du corps marqueront un profond respect. 
Mais en l’action qui marque la Foi, le corps peut être tout-à-fait incliné, les bras ploiés & joignant le corps, les mains croisées l’une sur l’autre, & toute l’action doit marquer une profonde humilité. 
Le Ravissement, ou extase peut faire paroître le corps renversé en arriere, les élevés, les mains ouvertes, & toute l’action marquera un transport de joie. 
Dans le Mépris & l’Aversion le corps peut se retirer en arriere, les bras dans l’action de repousser l’objet pour lequel on a de l’aversion ; ils peuvent se retirer en arriere, & les pieds & les jambes faire la même chose. 
Mais en l’Horreur les mouvemens doivent être bien plus violens que dans l’Aversion, car le corps paroîtra fort retiré de l’objet qui cause de l’horreur, les mains seront fort ouvertes, & les doigts écartés, les bras fort serrés contre le corps, & les jambes dans l’action de courir.
La Fraieur a bien quelque chose de ces mouvemens, mais ils paroissent plus grands, & plus étendus ; car les bras se roidiront en avant, les jambes seront dans l’action de fuir de toutes leurs forces, & toutes les parties du corps paroîtront dans le désordre.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

Quotation

Les Expressions sont la pierre de touche de l’esprit du Peintre. Il montre par la justesse dont il les distribue, sa pénétration & son discernement : mais il faut le même esprit dans le Spectateur pour les bien apercevoir, que dans le Peintre pour les bien executer. On doit considérer un Tableau comme une Scene, où chaque Figure joue son rôle. Les Figures bien dessinées & bien coloriées sont admirables à la vérité, mais la plûpart des gens d’esprit, qui n’ont pas encore une Idée bien juste de la Peinture, ne sont sensibles à ces parties, qu’autant qu’elles sont accompagnées de la vivacité, de la justesse & de la délicatesse des Expressions. Elles sont un des plus rare talens de la Peinture, & celui qui est assez heureux pour les bien traiter, y intéresse non-seulement les Parties du visage, mais encore toutes celles du corps, & fait concourir à l’Expression générale du sujet, les objets même les plus inanimés, par la manière dont il les expose.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard
SPECTATEUR → jugement

Quotation

4°. L’expression qui consiste à representer naturellement les figures, leurs gestes & leurs passions, doit se faire avec précaution ; c’est-à-dire, que l’on doit dans les sujets que l’on veut peindre, avoir égard à la bien-séance, & ne pas permettre qu’aucune action indécente, & qui puisse blesser la modestie & la pudeur, s’y rencontre.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

La peinture est composée de tant de parties, que nous ne devons presque jamais nous flatter de ne pas perdre de vûë les unes, en nous attachant à chercher les autres. Il n’est pas moins rare de trouver des amis qui soient également touchez de toutes ces parties. L’un n’est sensible qu’à la couleur, & n’est que peu flatté de l’élégance du dessein ; l’autre au contraire prétend que sans le grand goût, la délicatesse & la pureté du dessein, la Peinture n’est autre qu’une affaire mécanique. L’Homme d’esprit & de sentiment ne s’attachera qu’à l’expression des têtes, & à l’ordonnance. L’homme d’érudition sera satisfait si la coutume est scrupuleusement observé dans un tableau : ainsi des autres.


Quotation

l faut presque autant de lumieres pour sentir le beau que pour le produire, on doit considerer la composition, la disposition, & l’invention comprises sous le terme général d’ordonnance. Le dessein est encore une des principales parties, il a pour baze la proportion, l’anatomie & la correction.
Lorsque ces deux parties sont jointes au coloris dont l’objet est la lumiere & l’ombre, on ne peut plus rien souhaiter que l’expression ; elle se fait connoître non seulement par les mouvemens des parties du visage, mais encore par celles du corps, selon le caractére des sujets que l’on traite
.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

EXPRESSION. Dans la division ordinaire, l’expression est comprise dans le dessein ; mais il me semble qu’on devroit en faire une partie séparée. Dessiner & exprimer sont des choses différentes. L’expression est la représentation véritable & naturelle des choses, surtout des mouvemens de l’âme & des passions. 
On dit communément que le dessein & le coloris, sont le corps de la Peinture, & que l’
expression en est l’âme. 
Membris addenda est ignea virtus
Scilicet, atque hebetes anima infundenda per artus.
Singula vitali Spirent animata colore,
Gestus ubique micet vivax, vultusque loquaces
Spiritus intus alat.
Pictura Carmen.
L’
expression, dit Mr de Piles, est la pierre de touche de l’esprit du Peintre. 
Raphaël, Jules Romain, & le Dominiquin ont excellé dans l’
expression, sont la justesse & la vérité, le naturel, la noblesse, la vivacité, la finesse.


Quotation

Parmi les Pastels faits de cette année, le Portrait du sieur Restout fait par le Sieur de la Tour pour sa réception à l’Academie, a rassemblé le plus de suffrage. Il a su éviter le contresens que j’ai observé ci-dessus, & s’est bien donné de garde de faire comtempler sotement le public à celui qu’il fait dessiner d’après un modèle. Bien des gens auroient souhaité quil eût fait entrer ce modèle dans sa composition, & que le Public eût été instruit de ce qu’il regarde avec cette vivacité d’attention qui a donne l’ame & la vie à son portrait. On a trouvé cependant l’expression un peu trop forte pour une action aussi tranquille ; elle paroit même chargée. L’on a encore desiré plus d’union dans les chairs du visage dont les touches sont un peu séches & découpées, elles auroient pu être mieux fonduës sans faire tort à la ressemblance, ce qu’il a excellement pratiqué dans plusieurs de ses portraits, & particulièrement dans celui de M. Paris de Montmartel qui est tout auprès, & qui est parfait.

La Font de Saint Yenne souligne ici l’importance, dans un portrait, d’accorder la rhétorique de l’action avec celle de l’expression.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

Celui qui représente la continence de Scipion semble un peu mieux colorié ; mais pour le coup, M. Restout me permettra de lui dire que ce sujet ne lui convenait en rien. Il s’agissoit d’y caractériser dans tout son éclat, une personne célebre par la beauté dont les charmes étoient si forts & si puissans qu’il étoit comme impossible d’y résister : On relevoit parlà adroitement, le mérite de Scipion qui eut le courage prodigieux d’en triompher ? Point du tout ; on se contente de nous croquer ici séchement une matrone de la plus mauvaise grâce du monde ; & qui n’est remarquable uniquement que par sa laideur. Ce n’est point là ce qu’il falloit encore une fois, mais M. Restout ne pouvoit pas mieux faire dans ce genre. Cet Auteur devroit bien s’étudier à mieux connoitre ce qui lui est propre. Comment pouvoit-il nous donner quelque idée de la beauté, lui qui n’a pu, encore atteindre à nous représenter des caracteres simples & ordinaires ? Je n’en veux pour exemple que ses Tableaux de Dévotion, qui sont comme on sait le fort de cet Auteur. Cependant quelles attitudes dures & forcées n’y voit-on pas ? Quelles grimaces pour des expressions ? Quels airs de tête effrayans & bizarres !


Quotation

Je ne le [ndr : De Troy] chicanne uniquement que sur l’expression. Dans son dernier tableau, par exemple, j’avoue que la principale passion, qui remplit Médée, est le contentement, mais aussi quel est-il ? Devoit-on le représenter aussi froid ? Ne falloit-il pas y ajouter un dédain triomphant & la cruelle joye que ressentoit Médée à la vûe du désespoir de son perfide ? d’ailleurs Jason est agité dans cette circonstance de tous les transports les plus violens, de l’amour, de la tendresse paternelle, de l’horreur du plus noir forfait, dont même il est témoin… Est-ce qu’il ne devoit pas porter l’empreinte de ces différentes passions ? Loin delà les couleurs de son visage ne sont aucunement altérées, il paroît précisément le même que dans les Tableaux précédens, &c.


5 quotations

Quotation

In Expression we must Regard the Sex, Man must appear more Resolute and Vigorous, his Actions more Free, Firm and Bold ; but Womans Actions more Tender, Easy and Modest.
            We must likewise Regard the
Age, whose different Times and Degrees carry them to different Actions, as well by the Agitations of the Minde as the Motions of the Body.
            We must also take Notice of the
Condition, if they be Men of great Extent and Honour, their Actions must be Reserv’d and Grave ; but if Plebeians, more Rude and Disorderly.
           
Bodys Deifyd must be Retrench’d of all those Corruptible Things which serve only for the Preservation of Humane Life, as the Veins, Nerves, Arterys ; and taking onely what serve for Beauty and Form.
            We must likewise observe to give to
Man Actions of Understanding ; to Children, Actions which only Express the Motions of their Passions ; to Brutes, purely the Motions of Sence.
[...].
            Nor is it sufficient that we observe
Action and Passion in their own Natures, in the Complection and Constitution ; in the Age, Sexe, and Condition : but we must likewise observe the Season of the Year in which we express them.
            The
Spring ; Merry, Nimble, Prompt and of a good Colour. The Summer, causeth Open and Wearisome Actions, Subject to sweating and Redness. Automn, Doutbfull, and something Inclining to Melancholly. Winter, Restrain’d, drawn in and Trembling.
[...].



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

However I will here make him [ndr : au lecteur] an Offer of an Abstract of what I take to be those by which a Painter, or Connoisseur, may safely conduct himself, [...] II. The Expression must be Proper to the Subject, and the Characters of the Persons ; It must be strong, so that the Dumb-shew may be perfectly Well, and Readily understood. Every Part of the Picture must contribute to This End ; Colours, Animals, Draperies, and especially the Actions of the Figures, and above all the Airs of the Heads.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

I confine the Sublime to History, and Portrait-Painting ; And These must excell in Grace, and Greatness, Invention, or Expression ; and that for Reasons which will be seen anon. Michael Angelo’s Great Style intitles Him to the Sublime, not his Drawing ; ‘tis that Greatness, and a competent degree of Grace, and not his Colouring that makes Titian capable of it : As Correggio’s Grace, with a sufficient mixture of Greatness gives this Noble Quality to His Works. Van Dyck’s Colouring, nor Pencil tho’ perfectly fine would never introduce him to the Sublime ; ‘tis his Expression, and that Grace, and Greatness he possess’d, (the Utmost that Portrait-Painting is Justly capable of) that sets some of his Works in that Exalted Class ;



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire
GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → merveilleux et sublime

Quotation

The Kind of Picture, or Drawing having been consider’d, regard is to be had to the Parts of Painting ; we should see in which of These they excell, and in what Degree.
And these several Parts do not Equally contribute to the Ends of Painting : but (I think) ought to stand in this Order.

Grace and Greatness,
Invention,
Expression,
Composition,
Colouring,
Drawing,
Handling.


The last can only Please ; The next (by which I understand Pure Nature, for the Great, and Gentile Style of Drawing falls into another Part) This also can only Please, Colouring Pleases more ; Composition Pleases at least as much as Colouring, and moreover helps to Instruct, as it makes those Parts that do so more conspicuous ; Expression Pleases, and Instructs Greatly ; the Invention does both in a higher Degree, and Grace, and Greatness above all. Nor is it peculiar to That Story, Fable, or whatever the Subject is, but in General raises our Idea of the Species, gives a most Delightful, Vertuous Pride, and kindles in Noble Minds an Ambition to act up to That Dignity Thus conceived to be in Humane Nature. In the Former Parts the Eye is employ’d, in the Other the Understanding.



Other conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la peinture
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Quotation

I should […] have been sparing of Examples, if I had not already given many for other Purposes, but which are also Instances of the Sublime in Painting, and which are scatter’d up and down throughout all I have Written on this Amiable Subject : But One or Two I will add in This Place. The First shall be from Rembrandt ; and surely he has given Us such an Idea of a Death-Bed in one Quarter of a Sheet of Paper in two Figures with few Accompagnements, and in Clair Obscure only, that the most Eloquent Preacher cannot paint it so strongly by the most Elaborate Discourses ; […]. An Old Man is lying on his Bed, just ready to Expire ; this Bed has a plain Curtain, and a Lamp hanging over it, for ‘tis in a Little sort of an Alcove, Dark Otherwise, though ‘tis Bright Day in the next Room, and which is nearest the Eye, There the Son of this Dying Old Man is at Prayers. […]. All is over with this Man, and there is such an Expression in this Dull Lamp-Light at Noon-Day, such a Touching Solemnity, and Repose that these Equal any thing in the Airs, and Attitudes of the Figures, which have the Utmost Excellency that I think I ever saw, or can conceive is possible to be Imagined.
‘Tis a Drawing, I have it. And here is an Instance of an Important Subject, Impress’d upon our Minds by such Expedients, and Incidents as display an Elevation of Thought, and fine Invention ; and all this with the Utmost Art, and with the greatest Simplicity ; That being more Apt, at least in this Case, than any Embellishment whatsoever.

D'après C. Gibson-Wood, le dessin évoqué par Richardson ne représente pas un homme sur son lit de mort, mais la prière de saint Pierre avant la résurrection de Tabitha (C. Gibson-Wood, 2003, reproduction p. 168).



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → merveilleux et sublime

2 quotations

Quotation

Rede bey Examinirung eines Kunst-Gemäldes, p. 26
Expression nennet man die eigentliche Gebährden derer Leiber als auch ihre Glieder/ wie sie nach Umbstand der Sache von denen Geistern pflegen bewegt zu werden. 


Quotation

Rede bey Examinirung eines Kunst-Gemäldes, p. 31
Angehends das Dritte Theil/ die
Expression, so eussern sich hierbey recht geistereiche Anmerckungen/ dann die Gebehrden der meisten Figuren dieses Gemäldes/ leiten das Auge des Anschauers so gleich auf die Haupt-Figur/ so hat er ller dreyen Personen ihre Gebährden den recht eigentlich nach dem Ambt und dem Stande eines jederen ins besondere wohl exprimiret und aus-gedrücket ; […]/ 


Quotation

Je ne croy pas que nous ayons aucun de ces reproches à faire au tableau de la famille de Darius. C'est un veritable poëme où toutes les regles sont observées. L'unité d'action, c'est Alexandre qui entre dans la tente de Darius. L'unité de lieu, c'est cette tente où il n'y a que les personnes qui s'y doivent trouver. L'unité de temps c'est le moment où Alexandre dit qu'on ne s'est pas beaucoup trompé en prenant Ephestion pour luy, parce que Ephestion est un autre luy-mesme. Si l'on regarde avec quel soin on a fait tendre toutes choses à un seul but, rien n'est de plus lié, de plus reuni, & de plus un, si cela se peut dire, que la representation de cette histoire ; & rien en même temps n'est plus divers & plus varié si l'on considère les différentes attitudes des personnages, & les expressions particulieres de leurs passions. Tout ne va qu'à representer l'étonnement, l'admiration, la surprise & la crainte que cause l'arrivée du plus celebre Conquerant de la Terre, & si ces passions qui n'ont toutes qu'un mesme objet le trouvent différemment exprimées dans les diverses personnes qui les ressentent. La Mere de Darius abbatuë sous le poids de sa douleur & de son âge, [...].



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

A l'égard de l'expression des passions particulieres l'on remarqua, que la passion est un mouvement de l'ame, qui reside en la partie sensitive [...] ; que d'ordinaire tout ce qui cause à l'ame de la passion fait faire quelque action au Corps, & qu'ainsi de sçavoir quelles sont les actions du Corps qui expriment les passions de l'ame, L'on dit que ce que l'on appelloit action en cet endroit, n'étoit autre chose que le mouvement de quelque partie, & que ce mouvement ne se faisoit que par le changement des muscles, [...] ; ainsi le muscle qui agit le plus reçoit le plus d'esprits, & par consequent devient enflé plus que les autres.
[...] L'on remarqua qu'encore qu'on puisse representer les passions de l'ame par les actions de tout le Corps, neanmoins que c'étoit au visage où les marques s'y faisoient le plus connoître, & non seulement dans les yeux comme quelques-uns l'ont crû, mais principalement en la forme & aux mouvements des sourcils ; que comme il y a deux appetits dans la partie sensitive de l'ame, il y a aussi deux mouvemens qui y ont un parfait rapport, les uns s'élevent au cerveau & les autres inclinent vers le coeur.

Cette définition correspond à celle donnée par Le Brun et que l’on retrouve dans sa Conférence de M. Le Brun, (...) sur l'expression générale et particulière (...) éditée en 1698, précisément à partir de la page 4 (et suivantes). Par ailleurs, une partie de ce passage de Testelin est repris par Florent Le Comte dans son Cabinet des singularitez (...), plus précisément aux pages 43-44 de son édition de 1699-1700 (Paris, Etienne Picart & Nicolas Le Clerc, tome I, vol. I).

mouvement de l'âme


Quotation

L'on remarqua pour la fin, qu'il n'est pas possible, de prescrire precisement toutes les marques des differentes passions, à cause de la diversité, de la forme, & du temperament : [...] qu'ainsi le Peintre doit avoir égard à toutes ces differences, pour conformer les expressions passions au caractere des figures, à la proportion & aux contours.
L'on rapporta à ce propos, ce que quelques naturalistes ont écrit de la physionomie, à sçavoir, que les affections de l'ame suivent le temperament du corps, & que les marques exterieures sont des signes certains des affections de l'ame [...] ; que le mot de Physionomie est un mot composé du Grec, qui signifie regle ou loi de nature, par lesquelles les affections de l'ame ont du rapport à la forme du corps : qu'ainsi il y a des signes fixes & permanents qui font connoître les passions de l'ame, à sçavoir celle qui reside en la partie sensitive.

Comme de nombreuses autres parties de texte, ce passage de Testelin est en partie repris par Florent Le Comte dans son Cabinet des singularitez (...), plus précisément aux pages 44-45 de son édition de 1699-1700 (Paris, Etienne Picart & Nicolas Le Clerc).

affection


Quotation

Les Anciens n’ont-ils pas attribué deux appetits à la partie sensitive de l’ame, rangeant dans le CONCUPISCIBLE, les passions simples & dans l’IRASCIBLE les plus farouches, celles qui sont composées, pretendant que l’amour, la haine, le desir, la joye & la tristesse sont renfermées dans le premier, & que la crainte, la hardiesse, l’esperance, le desespoir, la colere, & la peur resident dans l’autre ; cela peut être expliqué plus au long. On conclut qu’il est impossible de prescrire precisément toutes les marques des differentes passions, à cause de la diversité de la forme, & du temperamment ; qu’un visage plein ne forme pas les mêmes plis, que celui qui sera maigre & desseiché […]. Qu’ainsi le Peintre doit avoir égard à toutes ces differences, pour conformer les expressions des passions au caractere des figures, à la proportion & aux contours.

Comme de nombreuses autres parties de texte, ce passage de Florent Le Comte est tiré de l'ouvrage "Les Sentimens (...)" de Testelin, plus précisément à la page 24 de l'édition de La Haye (Matthieu Rogguet, vers 1693-1694). Ce passage se retrouve également chez Le Brun dans sa conférence consacrée à l'expression des passions (6 octobre et 10 novembre 1668)


Quotation

Quoique les passions de l’ame se fassent reconnoître plus sensiblement dans les traits du visage qu’ailleurs, elles demandent souvent d’être accompagnées des autres parties du corps. Car dans les sujets qui demandent l’expression de quelque partie essentielle, si vous ne touchez le Spectateur que foiblement, vous lui inspirez une tiedeur qui le rebute : au lieu que si vous le touchez bien, vous lui donnez un plaisir infini.
La tête est donc la partie du corps qui contribue toute seule plus que toutes les autres ensemble à l’expression des passions. […]
Les parties du visage contribuent toutes à mettre au dehors les sentimens du cœur ; mais sur-tout les yeux, qui sont, comme, dit Ciceron, deux fenêtres par où l’ame se fait voir […] des sourcils & de la bouche […] si vous savez les joindre avec le langage des yeux, vous aurez une harmonie merveilleuse pour toutes les passions de l’ame.
Le nez […]
Le mouvement des lévres […]
Pour ce qui est des mains, elles obéissent à la tête, elles lui servent en quelque maniere d’armes & de secours ; sans elles l’action est foible & comme à demi-morte […]


Quotation

Timantes, on the contrary [ndr : Parrhasius vient d’être évoqué], was of a sweet, modest Temper, and was Admirable in the Expression of Passions ; as appear’d by his Famous Picture of the Sacrifice of Iphigenia ; where he drew so many different sorts of Sorrow upon the Faces of the Spectators, according to the Concerns they had in that Tragical Piece of Religion, that being at last come to Represent Agamemnon’s Face, who was Father to the Virgin, he found himself Exhausted, and not able to reach the Excess of Grief that naturally must have been showed in his Countenance upon that Occasion ; and therefore he covered his Face with a part of his Garment ; saving thereby the Honour of his Art , and yet giving some Idea of the greatness of the Father’s Sorrow. His particular Talent lay, in giving more to understand by his Pictures, than was really express’d in them.


Quotation

Friend,
 
            This puts me in mind of the moving part of Painting ; which is, the stirring of the Affections of the Spectator by the Expression of the Passions in the Piece ; and methinks this might well be called a part of Painting.
 
                        Traveller.
 
            It is Comprehended under that of Invention ; and is indeed the most difficult part of it, as depending intirely upon the Spirit and Genius of the Painter, who can express things no otherwise than as he conceives them, and from thence come the different Manners ;



Other conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Quotation

Every Figure, and Animal must be affected in the Picture as one should suppose they Would, or Ought to be. And all the Expressions of the several Passions, and Sentiments must be made with regard to the Characters of the Persons moved in them. At the Raising of Lazarus, some may be allow’d to be made to hold something before their Noses, and this would be very just, to denote That Circumstance in the Story, the Time he had been dead ; but this is exceedingly improper in the laying our Lord in the Sepulchre, altho’ he had been dead much longer than he was ; however Pordenone has done it.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

1 quotations

Quotation

Polydore, in a Drawing of the same Subject [ndr : la descente de la croix] […] has finely express’d the Excessive Grief the Virgin, by intimating ‘twas Otherwise Inexpressible : Her Attendants discover abundance of Passion, and Sorrow in their Faces, but Hers is hid by Drapery held up by both her Hands : The whole Figure is very Compos’d, and Quiet ; no Noise, no Outrage, but great Dignity appears in her, suitable to her Character.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

1 quotations

Quotation

A History-Painter must describe all the Various Characters, Real, or Imaginary ; and that in all their Situations, Pleas’d, Griev’d, Angry, Hoping, Fearing, &c. A Face-Painter has to do with all the Real Characters, except only some few of the Meanest, and the most Sublime, but not with that Variety of Sentiments as the other. The whole Business of His Life is to describe the Golden Age, […]. Every one of His People therefore must appear Pleas’d, and in Good Humour ; but Varied suitably to the Rais’d Character of the Person drawn ;



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait

3 quotations

Quotation

{Die Affecten oder Gemütsregungen/ sind in der Bild-Mahlerey zu beobachten:} DEr kunstreiche Mahler/ soll nicht allein wol verstehen/ die vier Complexionen oder {Die Affecten oder Gemütsregungen/ sind in der Bild-Mahlerey zu beobachten:} Natur-Arten des Menschen/ als Sanguineo, Cholerico, Phlegmatico und Melancholico, sondern auch/ wie und warum sich die unter einander vermischen. Die Wirkungen derselben/ werden ingemein die Affecten oder Gemüts-regungen genennet: weil sie/ wie die leibliche {weil sie Gestalt und Farbe ändern.} Zufälle dem Leib/ das Gemüt afficiren und bewegen. {weil sie Gestalt und Farbe ändern.} Diese Wissenschaft/ ist in unserer Kunst nicht zu verunachtsamen: sintemal dieselbe nicht geringe Veränderungen des Angesichts und der Gestalt des Menschen/ auch der Farbe/ verursachen.


Quotation

Es dienet zur Mahlerey/ daß man wisse/ worauf jede Farbe in der Sitten-Lehre deute: damit der Künstler den Figuren/ nach Innhalt der Historie/ und nach den Gemüts-regungen/ ihre Colorit und Gestalt geben könne.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

Quotation

Gleiche Meinung {Auch die Temperamenten/ und Gemühts-Wirckungen/ Passionen und Affecten zu beobachten.} hat es auch mit Erkennung und Erlernung der viererley Complexionen des Menschen/ mit den Wirckungen des Gemüts/ der Angesichter/ Farben/ und Ursachen der Veränderungen; vorab mit den Gestalten der Zornigen Abscheulichkeit/ der Furcht/ oder Schreckbarkeit/ der Schamhafftigkeit/ Angst/ Misgunst/ Neides und Leides/ der Traurigkeit und Verzweifflung: als wodurch alle des Menschen Gestalt/ Angesichter/ Geberden und Farben verändert werden.


1 quotations

Quotation

Il y a plusieurs choses à considérer dans l’Invention, savoir l’action & le mouvement, qu’on apelle aussi le feu, l’expression & quelqu’autres, je ne sai quoi que les Italiens apellent fierté, furie, terribilité : Et enfin la douceur et la grace. Car quoi qu’un Peintre doive parfaitement savoir le Dessein, pour reüssir à ces trois choses : elle dependent pourtant de la faculté qu’on apelle Compositive.
Toutes les Atitudes & les situations des corps naturels, ne sont pas également belles, pour étre representées dans une parfaite Composition de Peinture, quoique d’ailleurs, elles soient tres-naturelles […]
L’excellence de l’Invention consiste donc à trouver facilement, & à savoir à méme-tems choisir ce qu’il y a de plus beau dans la situation de toutes les figures qui doivent composer une Histoire, afin qu’elles se presentent du côté qui les est le plus avantageux.
Quant à l’Expression & à la fierté, elles resultent du concours de toutes les parties d’une figure, particulièrement du visage, des mains & enfin de tous les membres, pour exprimer une passion, le mouvement intérieur, & l’état où se trouve le corps qu’on represente dans un Tableau, ou dans un Dessein. En éfet ce sont les diverses situations de ces parties qui expriment nos volontés avec autant d’énergie que la parole. […]
[…] Lomasse a pretendu nous enseigner une regle pour donner du feu dans l’Invention : C’est de faire les figures serpentantes, comme la flame qui ne monte jamais qu’en serpentant : De sorte qu’il y ait toujours trois lignes, l’une de la téte aux épaules, l’autre des épaules aux hanches, & la troisiéme des hanches aux parties inferieures.
[…] Tant il est vray que l’œil aime la varieté & le Contraste dans cét Art, & que le feu & la grâce ne font qu’un certain assaisonnement qui releve le naturel.

action · mouvement · passion · expression · fierté · furie · terribilité



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Tenir du Fier & du Terrible,
S’attribuë à des manieres de Desseigner & Peindre, dont les Figures ou autres Corps ayant vie ou autrement, paroissent en leurs Regards, Ports et Actions, Fieres, Cruelles et Affreuses, ainsi que cela se voit ordinairement en diverses rondes Bosses & bas Reliefs Antiques, & en plusieurs Tableaux, Desseins & Stampes de Jules Romain, et mesme en quelques unes de Raphaël d’Urbin.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

2 quotations

Quotation

Il y a plusieurs choses à considérer dans l’Invention, savoir l’action & le mouvement, qu’on apelle aussi le feu, l’expression & quelqu’autres, je ne sai quoi que les Italiens apellent fierté, furie, terribilité : Et enfin la douceur et la grace.

feu · action · mouvement · passion · expression · furie · terribilité



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Quant à l’Expression & à la fierté, elles resultent du concours de toutes les parties d’une figure, particulièrement du visage, des mains & enfin de tous les membres, pour exprimer une passion, le mouvement intérieur, & l’état où se trouve le corps qu’on represente dans un Tableau, ou dans un Dessein. En éfet ce sont les diverses situations de ces parties qui expriment nos volontés avec autant d’énergie que la parole.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

9 quotations

Quotation

L’on dit que Marc de Sienne Disciple de Michel l’Ange receut un jour cét advis de son Maistre qu’il fist tousjours sa figure Pyramidale, serpentée, & multipliée par un, deux, & trois. Et croy-je qu’en ce precepte consiste tout le secret de la Peinture, parce que la plus grande grace d’une figure est qu’elle semble se mouvoir, ce que les Peintres appellent fureur, ou esprit de la figure. Et pour representer ce mouvement, il n’y a point de forme qui s’y accommode mieux que celle de la flamme du feu, lequel, suivant ce que dit Aristote, & tous les autres Philosophes, est l’élement le plus actif de tous, & la forme de sa flamme est de toutes la plus propre au mouvement parce qu’elle a l’angle & la pointe aiguë avec laquelle elle semble fendre l’air pour monter à sa Sphère. De sorte que lors que la figure aura cette forme, elle sera tres belle. Et cecy se peut encore observer de deux manières, l’une est, que l’angle de la Pyramide, qui est la partie la plus aiguë tienne le haut, & la basse qui est le plus ample de la Pyramide soit en bas, comme le feu : & alors le bas de la figure, sçavoir les jambes & les draperies doit estre large, & le haut d’icelle ira en retressissant en forme de Piramide, monstrant une espaule, & que l’autre fuye & soit racourcie, faisant tordre le corps, qui en cachera l’une & découvrira & fera relever l’autre. La figure peut encore estre peinte, comme une Pyramide renversée, c’est à dire, qui ait la base en haut & la pointe en bas ; & ainsi les parties superieures de la figure seront larges, monstrant les deux palerons, ou estendant les bras, monstrant une jambe, & cachant l’autre, ou d’autre façon, comme il semblera mieux au sage Peintre. […] le Peintre doit accompagner cette forme Pyramidale, avec la forme serpentée, qui represente la tortuosité d’une coleuvre vivant lors qu’il chemine, qui est la propre forme de la flamme du feu qui ondoye. Cela veut dire que la figure doit representer la forme de la lettre S. droite ou renversée, comme est celle icy .S. [ndr : S renversé] parce qu’alors elle aura sa beauté.

Terme traduit par FIGURA dans Lomazzo, 1585, p. 23.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion

Quotation

Le mouvement, action, ou actitude, est appellée par les Peintres l'ornement & la grace de la figure en sa position ou situation. De plus, elle est dite la fureur, l’esprit, ou l’ame de la figure.

Terme traduit par FIGURA dans Lomazzo, 1585, p. 30.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → ornement
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

Chap. VI, Des cinq Sources du Grand.
Il y a, pour ainsi dire, cinq Sources principales du Sublime : mais ces cinq Sources présupposent, comme pour fondement commun,
une Faculté de bien parler ; sans quoi tout le reste n’est rien.
Cela posé, la premiere & la plus considerable est
une certaine Elevation d’esprit qui nous fait penser heureusement les choses […].
La seconde consiste dans le
Pathetique : j’entens par Pathetique, cet Enthousiasme, & cette vehemence naturelle qui touche & qui émeut. Au reste à l’égard de ces deux premieres, elles doivent presque tout à la Nature, & il faut qu’elles naissent en nous : au lieu que les autres dépendent de l’Art en partie.
La troisiéme n’est autre chose que
les Figures tournées d’une certaine maniere. Or les Fgures sont de deux sortes les Figures de Pensée, & les Figures de Diction.
Nous mettons pour la quatriesme,
la Noblesse de l’expression, qui a deux parties, le choix des mots, & la diction elegante & figurée.
Pour la cinquiéme qui est celle, à proprement parler, qui produit le Grand & qui renferme en soi toutes les autres,
c’est la Composition & l’arrangement des paroles dans toute leur magnificence & leur dignité.
[…]. Et certainement […] pour avoir creu que le Sublime & le Pathetique
naturellement n’alloient jamais l’un sans l’autre, & ne faisoient qu’un, il [ndr : Cecilius] se trompe : puis qu’il y a des Passions qui n’ont rien de Grand ; & et qui ont mesme quelque chose de bas comme l’Affliction, la Peur, la Tristesse : & qu’au contraire il se rencontre quantité de choses grandes & sublimes, où il n’entre point de passion.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → merveilleux et sublime

Quotation

[…]  si les Figures naturellement soûtiennnent le Sublime, le Sublime de son costé soûtient merveilleusement les Figures. […] il n’y a point de Figure plus excellente que celle qui est tout-à-fait cachée, & lorsqu’on ne reconnoist point que c’est une Figure. Or il n’y a point de secours ni de remede plus merveilleux pour l’empescher de paroître, que le Sublime & le Pathetique, par ce que l’Art ainsi renfermé au milieu de quelque chose de Grand & d’éclatant, a tout ce qui lui manquoit, & n’est plus suspect d’aucune tromperie. [….] Comment est-ce que l’Orateur a caché la figure dont il se sert ? N’est-il pas aisé de reconnoistre que c’est par l’éclat mesme de sa pensée ? Car comme les moindres lumieres s’évanoüissent, quand le Soleil vient à les éclairer ; de mesme, toutes ces subtilitez de Rhetorique disparoissent à la veüe de cette grandeur qui les environne de tous costés. La mesme chose à peu prés arrive dans la peinture. En effet qu’on tire plusieurs lignes paralleles sur un mesme plan, avec les jours & les ombres : il est certain que ce qui se presentera d’abord à la veuë, ce sera le lumineux, à cause de son grand éclat qui fait qu’il semble sortir hors du tableau, & s’approcher en quelque façon de nous. Ainsi le Sublime & le Pathetique, soit par une affinité naturelle qu’ils ont avec les mouvemens de nostre ame, soit à cause de leur brillant, paroissent davantage, & semblent toucher de plus prés notre esprit que les Figures, dont ils cachent l’art, & qu’ils mettent comme à couvert.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → merveilleux et sublime
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la lumière

Quotation

Pour les figures, rien ne doit se ressembler moins dans un Tableau que les airs de teste, parce que l'on n'a jamais veu deux personnes qui se ressemblent parfaitement, & c'est en cela plus qu'en toute autre chose qu'on reconnoist la variété de la Nature. Si l'on est diffèrent dans les traits du visage, à plus forte raison lorsqu'il est agité par quelque passion de l'ame, puisque quand mesme deux personnes se ressembleroient dans leurs traits, la Nature aime tant la diversité, qu'ils ne se ressembleroient pas pour cela dans leurs expressions.


Quotation

[...] C’est en cet Ouvrage [ndr : groupe sculpté par Phidias représentant le Parnasse] que l’on peut dire que l’Art a égalé la Nature ; car ce sçavant Sculpteur [ndr : Phidias] avoit mis tant de grace, de beauté, de guayté dans toutes ces Figures, qu’il sembloit avoir fait vivre le marbre, & qu’il n’y manquoit que la parole.

Le but l’art est d’imiter la nature et d’insuffler la vie aux figures représentées



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Quant à l’Expression & à la fierté, elles resultent du concours de toutes les parties d’une figure, particulièrement du visage, des mains & enfin de tous les membres, pour exprimer une passion, le mouvement intérieur, & l’état où se trouve le corps qu’on represente dans un Tableau, ou dans un Dessein. En éfet ce sont les diverses situations de ces parties qui expriment nos volontés avec autant d’énergie que la parole.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Les Expressions sont la pierre de touche de l’esprit du Peintre. Il montre par la justesse dont il les distribue, sa pénétration & son discernement : mais il faut le même esprit dans le Spectateur pour les bien apercevoir, que dans le Peintre pour les bien executer. On doit considérer un Tableau comme une Scene, où chaque Figure joue son rôle. Les Figures bien dessinées & bien coloriées sont admirables à la vérité, mais la plûpart des gens d’esprit, qui n’ont pas encore une Idée bien juste de la Peinture, ne sont sensibles à ces parties, qu’autant qu’elles sont accompagnées de la vivacité, de la justesse & de la délicatesse des Expressions. Elles sont un des plus rare talens de la Peinture, & celui qui est assez heureux pour les bien traiter, y intéresse non-seulement les Parties du visage, mais encore toutes celles du corps, & fait concourir à l’Expression générale du sujet, les objets même les plus inanimés, par la manière dont il les expose.


Quotation

[...] Je ne vous ai point encore parlé de M. Vernet, qui est un de ceux dont j’ai le plus de choses à vous dire. Les Marines sont le principal genre auquel semble s’appliquer cet Auteur, si l’on peut fixer le genre d’un homme qui a autant de talent & de génie. Outre la fraîcheur, la vérité avec laquelle elles sont peintes, il sait encore les animer de figures extrêmement intéressantes & dessinées avec tout le feu & toutes l’expression possible. Les Acteurs qu’il introduit dans ses sujets n’y sont jamais muets ni inutiles. A juger de M. Vernet par cette partie, prise séparément, il peut passer pour un Peintre d’Histoire ; je dis plus, pour très-bon Poëte, tant il excelle à rendre les caracteres, le sentiment & les passions dans toute leur vérité.

acteur



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Of the disposition of the Parts.
{5. Of Disposition.} A Picture of many
figures, must needs express some Historicall part in it ; Every figure ought to represent therein, by a speechless discourse, the connexion in them. Assigne therefore the principall place, to the principall figures, next to hand ; Other figures, farther off. Finish the Principal figures, whilst your Spirits are fresh. {In order to perfection,} Frame not your Historicall Piece, rude, loose, and scattered, but rather, in an equitable roundness of composition ; to be perceived by each observer ; to be liked of the most, but to be judged, only, by the learned. Neglects in disposition, are soon discovered.
{Soon discovered.} Pourtray in your excellent
Pieces, not only the dainty Lineaments of Beauty, but shadow round about, rude thickers, rocks ; and so it yields more grace to the Picture, and sets it out : this discord (as in musicke) makes a comely concordance ; a disorderly order of counterfeit rudeness, pleaseth : so much grace, doe mean and ordinary things, receive from a good and orderly connexion.
{But altogether excellent.} All these together, make that perspicuous
disposiiton in a Piece of History ; and is the effectuall expression in Posture and Action ; the very Passion of each Figure ; the Soul of the PICTURE ; the Grace and Ayr of the Piece ; or the sweet Consent of all manner of perfections heaped together, in one Picture.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

L’on dit que Marc de Sienne Disciple de Michel l’Ange receut un jour cét advis de son Maistre qu’il fist tousjours sa figure Pyramidale, serpentée, & multipliée par un, deux, & trois. Et croy-je qu’en ce precepte consiste tout le secret de la Peinture, parce que la plus grande grace d’une figure est qu’elle semble se mouvoir, ce que les Peintres appellent fureur, ou esprit de la figure. Et pour representer ce mouvement, il n’y a point de forme qui s’y accommode mieux que celle de la flamme du feu, lequel, suivant ce que dit Aristote, & tous les autres Philosophes, est l’élement le plus actif de tous, & la forme de sa flamme est de toutes la plus propre au mouvement parce qu’elle a l’angle & la pointe aiguë avec laquelle elle semble fendre l’air pour monter à sa Sphère. De sorte que lors que la figure aura cette forme, elle sera tres belle. Et cecy se peut encore observer de deux manières, l’une est, que l’angle de la Pyramide, qui est la partie la plus aiguë tienne le haut, & la basse qui est le plus ample de la Pyramide soit en bas, comme le feu : & alors le bas de la figure, sçavoir les jambes & les draperies doit estre large, & le haut d’icelle ira en retressissant en forme de Piramide, monstrant une espaule, & que l’autre fuye & soit racourcie, faisant tordre le corps, qui en cachera l’une & découvrira & fera relever l’autre. La figure peut encore estre peinte, comme une Pyramide renversée, c’est à dire, qui ait la base en haut & la pointe en bas ; & ainsi les parties superieures de la figure seront larges, monstrant les deux palerons, ou estendant les bras, monstrant une jambe, & cachant l’autre, ou d’autre façon, comme il semblera mieux au sage Peintre. […] le Peintre doit accompagner cette forme Pyramidale, avec la forme serpentée, qui represente la tortuosité d’une coleuvre vivant lors qu’il chemine, qui est la propre forme de la flamme du feu qui ondoye. Cela veut dire que la figure doit representer la forme de la lettre S. droite ou renversée, comme est celle icy .S. [ndr : S renversé] parce qu’alors elle aura sa beauté.

Terme traduit par FIGURA PIRAMIDALE et FORMA PIRAMIDALE dans Lomazzo, 1585, p. 23.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

2 quotations

Quotation

L’on dit que Marc de Sienne Disciple de Michel l’Ange receut un jour cét advis de son Maistre qu’il fist tousjours sa figure Pyramidale, serpentée, & multipliée par un, deux, & trois. Et croy-je qu’en ce precepte consiste tout le secret de la Peinture, parce que la plus grande grace d’une figure est qu’elle semble se mouvoir, ce que les Peintres appellent fureur, ou esprit de la figure. Et pour representer ce mouvement, il n’y a point de forme qui s’y accommode mieux que celle de la flamme du feu, lequel, suivant ce que dit Aristote, & tous les autres Philosophes, est l’élement le plus actif de tous, & la forme de sa flamme est de toutes la plus propre au mouvement parce qu’elle a l’angle & la pointe aiguë avec laquelle elle semble fendre l’air pour monter à sa Sphère.

Terme traduit par FURIA dans Lomazzo, 1585, p. 23.

esprit de la figure



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

Le mouvement, action, ou actitude, est appellée par les Peintres l'ornement & la grace de la figure en sa position ou situation. De plus, elle est dite la fureur, l’esprit, ou l’ame de la figure.

Terme traduit par FURIA dans Lomazzo, 1585, p. 30.

mouvement · action · attitude · esprit de la figure · âme de la figure



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Il y a plusieurs choses à considérer dans l’Invention, savoir l’action & le mouvement, qu’on apelle aussi le feu, l’expression & quelqu’autres, je ne sai quoi que les Italiens apellent fierté, furie, terribilité : Et enfin la douceur et la grace.

action · mouvement · expression · fierté · terribilité



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Wat aangaat eenige afbeeldzels der Phisionomie, dezelve zouden wy mede hier ingevoegd hebben, maar alzo onlangs een fraay boekje, van de Hr. Le Brun geschreeven, en door F: de Kaarsgieter vertaald, daar van in 't licht gekomen is, vinden wy niet noodzakelyk daar verder af te melden, maar wyzen de Konstoeffenaars en beminnaars derzelve daar na toe, alzo het een nut en dienstig boek is, niet alleen voor Schilders, Beeldhouwers en Plaatsnyders; maar ook voor Dichters, Historieschryvers en andere.

[D'après DE LAIRESSE 1787, p. 132:] Quant aux exemples qu’on auroit pu demander ici de l’expression des différentes passions, nous renvoyons au livre de M. Le Brun, qui non-seulement est de la plus grande utilité pour les peintres, les sculpteurs & les graveurs, mais encore pour les poètes & les historiens même.


1 quotations

Quotation

Inde Worstelaers ende Schermers de krachten daer vereyst, in Laocoön vasten ouderdom in Antinous een swacke swier van Lichaem by na Vrouwelijck; in Apollo een wel-gemaeckten Jongelinck, in Bacchus ront gedraeyde leden, in Satyrs en Faunen beklonckenheyt van vlees, ende in de Vrouwen nu een tenger, ende dan een wel-gevoet en poesel Lichaem uytgebeelt; swijghende vande verscheyden Ouderdom, stant, gebaer, wesen, kleedingh en meer sulcks, kan niet genoegh verwonderen de groote schoonheyt in yder en soo wel onderscheydentheyt in allen, met de meeste eenvoudigheyt ende veel meer andere deughden vergeselschapt:

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] In the Wrestlers and the Fencers the force necessary for it is expressed, in Laocoon steady age, in Antinous a light almost feminine refinement of the body; in Apollo a well-made young man, in Bacchus twisting body parts, in Satyrs and Fauns sturdiness of flesh, and in the Women now a slender and then a well-fed and plump body; tacit on the different ages, postures, gestures, clothing and the like, the great beauty in each and the variety in all cannot amaze enough, accompanied by the highest simplicity and many other virtues:



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

3 quotations

Quotation

X. Von den Bewegungen deß Gemüts und der Ordnung in den Gemählen, p. 147
Der Mahler beobachtet alle Gebärden der Menschen wie sie mit freundlichen Angesicht lachen/ mit düstren erstaunen/mit zörnigen Händen ergrimmen/ mit lachendem Munde erfreuend/ und mit weinenden Augen sich traurig und schmerzhafft erweisen. Diese und dergleichen Geberden/ so das Gemüt entdecken/ können wol erkennet und von dem Mahler gebildet werden.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

Quotation

Rede bey Examinirung eines Kunst-Gemäldes, p. 26
Expression nennet man die eigentliche Gebährden derer Leiber als auch ihre Glieder/ wie sie nach Umbstand der Sache von denen Geistern pflegen bewegt zu werden. 


Quotation

Rede bey Examinirung eines Kunst-Gemäldes, p. 31
Angehends das Dritte Theil/ die
Expression, so eussern sich hierbey recht geistereiche Anmerckungen/ dann die Gebehrden der meisten Figuren dieses Gemäldes/ leiten das Auge des Anschauers so gleich auf die Haupt-Figur/ so hat er ller dreyen Personen ihre Gebährden den recht eigentlich nach dem Ambt und dem Stande eines jederen ins besondere wohl exprimiret und aus-gedrücket ; […]/ 


1 quotations

Quotation

Gleiche Meinung {Auch die Temperamenten/ und Gemühts-Wirckungen/ Passionen und Affecten zu beobachten.} hat es auch mit Erkennung und Erlernung der viererley Complexionen des Menschen/ mit den Wirckungen des Gemüts/ der Angesichter/ Farben/ und Ursachen der Veränderungen; vorab mit den Gestalten der Zornigen Abscheulichkeit/ der Furcht/ oder Schreckbarkeit/ der Schamhafftigkeit/ Angst/ Misgunst/ Neides und Leides/ der Traurigkeit und Verzweifflung: als wodurch alle des Menschen Gestalt/ Angesichter/ Geberden und Farben verändert werden.


Quotation

X. Von den Bewegungen deß Gemüts und der Ordnung in den Gemählen, p. 146
Daß Momus ein Fenesterlein in der Brust deß Menschen haben wollen/ desselben Gemüths Neigung zu erkennen/ ist aus überwitziger Tadelsucht hergerühret: Seine Augen sind die Spiegel seines Hertzen/ seine Geberden sind die Fenster seines Gemühtes/ seine Rede ist der Dolmetscher seiner Gedancken. Ob nun wol kein gemahltes Bild reden kann/ so weiden doch die Geberden und Augen desselben/ in was Begebenheit es vorgestellt worden/ und solches gehöret eigentlich zur der Deutkunst (arte de’cenni) von Ciovanni Bonifacio geschrieben […].


3 quotations

Quotation

{Die Affecten oder Gemütsregungen/ sind in der Bild-Mahlerey zu beobachten:} DEr kunstreiche Mahler/ soll nicht allein wol verstehen/ die vier Complexionen oder {Die Affecten oder Gemütsregungen/ sind in der Bild-Mahlerey zu beobachten:} Natur-Arten des Menschen/ als Sanguineo, Cholerico, Phlegmatico und Melancholico, sondern auch/ wie und warum sich die unter einander vermischen. Die Wirkungen derselben/ werden ingemein die Affecten oder Gemüts-regungen genennet: weil sie/ wie die leibliche {weil sie Gestalt und Farbe ändern.} Zufälle dem Leib/ das Gemüt afficiren und bewegen. {weil sie Gestalt und Farbe ändern.} Diese Wissenschaft/ ist in unserer Kunst nicht zu verunachtsamen: sintemal dieselbe nicht geringe Veränderungen des Angesichts und der Gestalt des Menschen/ auch der Farbe/ verursachen.

affect


Quotation

Verdrüssliche Affecten: der Zorn; dessen Wirkung in der äuserlichen Gestalt; die Traurigkeit […] Wirkung der Furcht […] Wirkung der Schamhaftigkeit/und Angst. […]
Neun andere Gemütsregungen […]
Zu diesen Sechs Gemütsregungen/ werden alle andere referirt und gezogen: als der Haß und die Zweytracht/ zum Zorn; die Leichtsinnigkeit und Ruhmsucht/ zur Freude; der Schrecken und die Kleinmütigkeit/ zur Furcht; die Mißgunst/ Leid und Verzweiflung/ zur Traurigkeit. Und hieraus erhellet genugsam/ wie vielfältig die Affecten/ des Menschen Gestalt/ Angesichter/ Gebärden und Farbe/ verändern können.

affect


Quotation

{Das Angesicht/ist dies Herzens Uhrzeiger: } Maßen das Angesichtgleichsam der Zeiger ist/ an dem Uhrwerk des Herzens/ und die Stirn dessen Bewegungen anzusagen pfleget. {macht die Menschen und Nationen vor einander unterscheiden und erkennen} Ja so gar ist das Angesicht gleichsam eine Figur des innerlichen Menschen/ daß man daraus einen alten Mann von einem jungen/ ein Weib von einem Mann/ einen Mäßigen von einem Unmäßigen/ einen Gesunden von einem Kranken; auch die Nationen/ einen Mohren von einem Indianer/ einen Franzosen von einem Spanier/ einen Teutschen von einem Italiäner/ endlich auch einen Lebendigen von einem Todten/ leichtlich unterscheiden kan. Und dieses geschihet eben darum/ weil man/ aus dem Angesicht/ das Gemüte und die Sitten des Menschen/ auch oftmals/ was im tiefsten seines Herzens verborgen liget/ errahten kann

Affekt


Quotation

Gleiche Meinung {Auch die Temperamenten/ und Gemühts-Wirckungen/ Passionen und Affecten zu beobachten.} hat es auch mit Erkennung und Erlernung der viererley Complexionen des Menschen/ mit den Wirckungen des Gemüts/ der Angesichter/ Farben/ und Ursachen der Veränderungen; vorab mit den Gestalten der Zornigen Abscheulichkeit/ der Furcht/ oder Schreckbarkeit/ der Schamhafftigkeit/ Angst/ Misgunst/ Neides und Leides/ der Traurigkeit und Verzweifflung: als wodurch alle des Menschen Gestalt/ Angesichter/ Geberden und Farben verändert werden.

affect · Passion


1 quotations

Quotation

Or de dire, comme il faut que ces Parties soient disposées pour exprimer les differentes Passions, c’est ce qui est impossible, & dont on ne peut donner de Regles bien precises, tant à cause que le travail en seroit infiny, que parce que chacun en doit user selon son Genie & selon l’étude qu’il en a dû faire. Souvenez-vous seulement de prendre garde que les Actions de vos Figures soient toutes naturelles. […] car il y en a qui s’imaginent avoir donné bien de la vie à leurs Figures, quand ils leur ont fait faire des Actions violentes & exagerées, que l’on peut appeler des Contorsions du Corps plûtost que des Passions de l’Ame ; & se donnent ainsi bien souvent de la peine, pour trouver quelque sorte de Passion où il n’en faut point du tout.
Joignez à tout ce que j’ay dit des Passions, Qu’il faut extremement avoir égard à la qualité des personnes passionnées : la Joye d’un Roy ne doit pas estre comme celle d’un valet, & la Fierté d’un Soldat ne doit pas ressembler à celle d’un Capitaine. C’est dans ces differences que consiste tout le fin & tout le delicat des passions. Paul Lomasse a écrit fort amplement sur chaque Passion en particulier dans son 2. Livre : mais prenez garde à ne vous y point trop arrester, & à ne point forcer vostre Genie.


1 quotations

Quotation

Friend,
 
            This puts me in mind of the moving part of Painting ; which is, the stirring of the Affections of the Spectator by the Expression of the Passions in the Piece ; and methinks this might well be called a part of Painting.
 
                        Traveller.
 
            It is Comprehended under that of Invention ; and is indeed the most difficult part of it, as depending intirely upon the Spirit and Genius of the Painter, who can express things no otherwise than as he conceives them, and from thence come the different Manners ;
or, as one may call them, Stiles of Painting ; some Soft and Pleasing, others Terrible and Fierce, others Majestick, other Low and Humble, as we see in the STILE of POETS ; and yet all Excellent in their Kinds.

spirit



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → génie, esprit, imagination

1 quotations

Quotation

't Zy dan welke gy ook voorneemt uit deze of andere gebeurlijkheden op 't Tafereel te brengen, zoo worden'er, ten aenzien van de beelden, noch driederleye onderscheydene aenmerkingen vereyscht. Als eerstelijk, om de waere en rechte driften der gemoederen, die de geschiedenis veroorzaken, in yder Persoon, nae 't belang, dat hy in de zaek heeft, te doen zien.Ten tweeden, om de eygentlijke bewegingen den lichaemen nae haere doeningen toe te passen. En ten derden, datze zich op een manier vertoonen, die de konst eygen is.

[BLANC J, 2006, p. 212] Que vous ayiez l'intention de mettre dans votre tableau un évènement parmi ceci ou parmi d'autres, il est nécessaire, regardant les figures, de faire trois différentes remarques. [ndr: premièrement], il faut voir les vraies et les justes passions des âmes, qui sont les causes de l'histoire, et cela en chaque personnage et en fonction de l'importance que chacun a dans le sujet. [ndr:deuxièmement], il faut donner aux corps les mouvements propres en fonction de leurs attitudes. [ndr:troisièmement], il faut qu'ils se montrent d'une manière propre à l'art.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → groupe
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Der dritte Discours von der Mahlerey. Das III. Capitel. Worauf über dieses in HISTORIEN-Gemählden besonders zu sehen, p. 68 
[Ist ferner nöthig auf folgende Stücke mit Achtung zu geben]
4. Auf die besondern Affecten einer jeden Person/ daß aus ihrem Gesichte/ und aus ihrer Action könne geschlossen werden/ was die Person andeuten und vorstellen solle. Auch in diesem Stück kan
le Brun, sonderlich aber das jenige Stück/ da er Alexandrum und Ephestion gemahlet/ wie sie zu des Darius Familie in das Gezelt kommen/ vor ein Haupt exempel dienen. Doch hat ihn Rubens noch darinnen übertroffen.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

1 quotations

Quotation

{Die Affecten oder Gemütsregungen/ sind in der Bild-Mahlerey zu beobachten:} DEr kunstreiche Mahler/ soll nicht allein wol verstehen/ die vier Complexionen oder {Die Affecten oder Gemütsregungen/ sind in der Bild-Mahlerey zu beobachten:} Natur-Arten des Menschen/ als Sanguineo, Cholerico, Phlegmatico und Melancholico, sondern auch/ wie und warum sich die unter einander vermischen. Die Wirkungen derselben/ werden ingemein die Affecten oder Gemüts-regungen genennet: weil sie/ wie die leibliche {weil sie Gestalt und Farbe ändern.} Zufälle dem Leib/ das Gemüt afficiren und bewegen. {weil sie Gestalt und Farbe ändern.} Diese Wissenschaft/ ist in unserer Kunst nicht zu verunachtsamen: sintemal dieselbe nicht geringe Veränderungen des Angesichts und der Gestalt des Menschen/ auch der Farbe/ verursachen.


2 quotations

Quotation

{27. Des Prelats & des autres personnes serieuses.}
[ndr : Le P.] On ne doit jamais peindre une action bizarre
Sous l’hermine Royale et moins sous la Tyarre.
Sans cette bien-seance un excez de chaleur
Sous le bandeau Royal feroient [sic] un basteleur ;
[…]
Prens donc garde mon fils, ce que je dis,
Et fuy, si tu les peins, les gestes estourdis.
Voy comme la posture affable et temperée
Accompagne un Prelat dans sous sa chappe dorée.
[…]
Leur maintien [ndr : du pape et et du roi] grave et doux doit par nostre artifice
Paroistre magnanime et non plein de caprice.
La plus part du beau monde a dans ses fonctions
De la grace en son geste et dans ses actions.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

4 quotations

Quotation

In imitation whereof, I hold it expedient for a Painter, to delight in seeing those which fight at cuffs, to observe the Eyes of privy murtherers, the courage of wrastlers, the actions of Stage-players, and the inticing allurements of curtesans, to the end he be not to seek many particulars, wherein the very Life and Soul of painting consisteth, wherefore, I could wish all Men carefully to keep their Brains waking, which whosoever shall omit his invention (out of doubt) will sleep, studying perhaps Ten Years about the action of one Figure, which in the end will prove nothing worth, whence all famous inventors, for the avoiding of such gross defects, have the rather shewed themselves subtile Searchers out of the effects of nature, being moved thereunto by a special delight of often seeing, and continually practizing that which they have preconceived, so that who so keepeth this Order, shall unawares attain to such an habit of practice, in lively expressing all Actions and Gestures, best fitting his purpose, that it will become an other nature.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Of the Necessity of Motion.


The order of the
place requireth, that I should consequently speak of Motion it self, namely with what Art the Painter ought to give Motions best fitting his Pictures, which is nothing else but a correspondency to the nature of the proportion of the forme and matter thereof, and herein consisteth the whole spirit and life of the Art, which the Painters call sometimes the fury, sometimes the grace, and sometimes the excellency of the Art, for hereby they express an evident distinction between the living and the dead, the fierce and the gentle, the ignorant and the learned, the sad and the merry, and (in a Word) discover all the several passions and Gestures which Mans Body is able to perform, which here we term by the name of Motions, for the more significant expressing of the Mind by an outward and bodily demonstration, so that by this means inward motions and affections may be as well, (or rather better) signified as by their speech, which is wrought by the proper operations of the Body, […]. 
Now the perfect knowledge of this motion, is (as hath been shewed) accounted the most difficult part of the art, and reputed as a divine gift. Insomuch, as herein alone consisteth the comparison between Painting and Poetry, for as it is required in a Poet, that besides the excellency of his wit, he should moreover be furnished with a certain propension and inclination of will, inciting and moving him to versity, (which the antient called the fury of Apollo and the Muses) so likewise a Painter ought, together with those natural parts which are required at his hands, to be furnished with a natural dexterity and inborn flight of expressing the principal motions, even from his cradle ; otherwise it is a very hard (if not impossible) matter, to obtain to the absolute perfection of this Art.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

SECT. I. Of Actions or Gestures.
These are those that most nearly resemble the life, be it either in laughing, grieving, sleeping, fighting, wrastling, running, leaping, and the like.
Amongst the Ancients, famous for lively motion and gesture,
Leonard Vincent deserves much, whose custom was to behold clowns, condemned persons, and did mark the contracting of their brows, the motions of their eyes and whole bodies ; and doubtless it cannot but be very expedient for an Artist in this kind to behold the variety of exercises, that discovers various actions, where the motion is discovered between the living and the dead, the fierce and the gentle, the ignorant and learned, the sad and the merry.
John de Bruges was the first inventer of Oyl-painting, that deserv’d excellently in this particular.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

SECT. II. Of the Passions or Complexions.
Man’s Body is composed of the Four Elements.
Melancholly resembles Earth.
Flegm the Water.
Choler the Fire.
Bloud the Air ; and answerable are the Gestures and Humours.
Melancholly bodies are slow, heavy, and restrained ; and the consequents are anxiety, disquietness, sadness, stubborness, &c. in which horror and despair will appear.
Flegmatick bodies are simple, humble, merciful.
Sanguine bodies are temperate, modest, gracious, princely, gentle, and merry ; to whom these affections of the mind best agree, viz. love, delight, pleasure, desire, mirth, and hope.
Cholerick bodies are violent, boisterous, arrogant, bold, and fierce ; to whom these passions appertain, anger, hatred, and boldness ; and accordingly the skillful Artist expresses the motions of these several bodies, which ought Philosophically to be understood.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Chap. VI, Des cinq Sources du Grand.
Il y a, pour ainsi dire, cinq Sources principales du Sublime : mais ces cinq Sources présupposent, comme pour fondement commun,
une Faculté de bien parler ; sans quoi tout le reste n’est rien.
Cela posé, la premiere & la plus considerable est
une certaine Elevation d’esprit qui nous fait penser heureusement les choses […].
La seconde consiste dans le
Pathetique : j’entens par Pathetique, cet Enthousiasme, & cette vehemence naturelle qui touche & qui émeut. Au reste à l’égard de ces deux premieres, elles doivent presque tout à la Nature, & il faut qu’elles naissent en nous : au lieu que les autres dépendent de l’Art en partie.
La troisiéme n’est autre chose que
les Figures tournées d’une certaine maniere. Or les Fgures sont de deux sortes les Figures de Pensée, & les Figures de Diction.
Nous mettons pour la quatriesme,
la Noblesse de l’expression, qui a deux parties, le choix des mots, & la diction elegante & figurée.
Pour la cinquiéme qui est celle, à proprement parler, qui produit le Grand & qui renferme en soi toutes les autres,
c’est la Composition & l’arrangement des paroles dans toute leur magnificence & leur dignité.
[…]. Et certainement […] pour avoir creu que le Sublime & le Pathetique
naturellement n’alloient jamais l’un sans l’autre, & ne faisoient qu’un, il [ndr : Cecilius] se trompe : puis qu’il y a des Passions qui n’ont rien de Grand ; & et qui ont mesme quelque chose de bas comme l’Affliction, la Peur, la Tristesse : & qu’au contraire il se rencontre quantité de choses grandes & sublimes, où il n’entre point de passion.

sublime



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → merveilleux et sublime

Quotation

[…] Le Tableau de M. de Troy, manque par plus d’un endroit. La figure de Creüse n’a ni beauté ni noblesse, elle est grande seulement, ce qui fait que ces deux défauts s’en remarquent d’autant mieux. […] Ce qui fait encore un autre tort à ce Tableau, c’est que beaucoup de figures accessoires y ont beaucoup de Majesté & font mieux appercevoir celle qui manque aux deux principales […].
Le sixiéme, qui représente les effets cruels du funeste présent de Médée, l’emporte par le frapant de son coloris. C’est un prestige qui lui a fait donner la préferance sur les six autres par grand nombre de personnes […].
L’on doit remarquer en celui-ci la Majesté des Figures qui le composent, leur belle harmonie & un fond d’Architecture de la derniere élégance. Jason s’y fait beaucoup plus regarder que dans les autres, par la richesse de sa taille & sa grande expression.


1 quotations

Quotation

…] Le Tableau de M. de Troy, manque par plus d’un endroit. La figure de Creüse n’a ni beauté ni noblesse, elle est grande seulement, ce qui fait que ces deux défauts s’en remarquent d’autant mieux. […] Ce qui fait encore un autre tort à ce Tableau, c’est que beaucoup de figures accessoires y ont beaucoup de Majesté & font mieux appercevoir celle qui manque aux deux principales […].
Le sixiéme, qui représente les effets cruels du funeste présent de Médée, l’emporte par le frapant de son coloris. C’est un prestige qui lui a fait donner la préferance sur les six autres par grand nombre de personnes […].
L’on doit remarquer en celui-ci la Majesté des Figures qui le composent, leur belle harmonie & un fond d’Architecture de la derniere élégance. Jason s’y fait beaucoup plus regarder que dans les autres, par la richesse de sa taille & sa grande expression.


1 quotations

Quotation

Des mouvemens appropriez à l’intention de la figure qui agist
Il y a des mouvemens qui s’expriment seulement par le moyen de l’esprit sans l’action du corps, & d’autres qui sont accompagnez de l’action du corps : les mouvements de l’esprit sans l’action du corps, laissent choir les bras, les mains [….] : mais les mouvemens de l’esprit accompagnez de l’action du corps tiennent, les membres en des attitudes appropriées à l’intention de l’esprit  […] Il se trouve encore un troisiesme mouvement qui participe de l’un & de l’autre : & un quatriesme tout particulier, lequel ne tient d’aucun d’eux ; les deux derniers sont sans esprit, ou d’une personne folle & extravagante, & on doit les rapporter au chapitre de la folie, & des grotesques capricieuses dont les moresques sont composées. 
[…]



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

16 quotations

Quotation

Soo gaet het dan vast en wy houden ’t daer voor, dat een fijn en bequaem Konstenaer boven alle dinghen nae een natuyr-kondighe ervaerenheyd behoort te trachten: Niet dat wy hem erghens in een kluyse soecken op te sluyten, om aldaer sijnen kop met verscheyden Geometrische proef-stucken te breken; veel min dat hy ’t ghevoelen van soo veele teghenstrijdighe ghesintheden der naturelicker Philosophen in sijne eenigheyd besighlick soude siften, om daer uyt den rechten aerd van allerley harts-tocht ende beweginghen volmaecktelick te verstaen: Dit en is de meyninghe niet: Want wy het ghenoegh achten dat hy door deen daghelicksche opmerckinghe uytvinde hoe de menighvuldighe gheneghenheden ende beroerten onses ghemoeds ’t gebaer onses aenghesichts dus of soo veranderen ende ontstellen. Elcke beroerte onses ghemoeds, seght Cicero {Lib. III de Oratore}, ontfanght een seker ghelaet van de nature, ’t welck men voor ’t bysondere ende eyghene ghelaet der selvigher beroerte houden magh.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] It is certainly so and we believe that a fine and able Artist should above all aim for an experience of natural things: Not that we intend to lock him up in a vault somewhere, to break his head on different Geometrical tests; even less that he would go through the experience of so many contrasting opinions of the natural Philosophers by himself, in order to perfectly understand the true nature of all sorts of passion and movements: This is not the opinion: Because we think it is enough that he finds out through a daily observation how the manifold situations and commotions of our mind change and startle the gesture of our face. Every commotion of our mind, says Cicero {…}, receives a certain feature from nature, which one may interpret as the special and particular feature of this commotion.

Junius elaborates on the amount of knowledge an artist has to acquire on subjects like geometry and philosophy in order to understand passions (hartstocht) and emotions (beweging / beroering). He concludes that a certain experience (ervarenheid) is necessary, rather than an in-depth study. This experience can be acquired by means of a close observation (opmerking) of facial expressions (gelaat) and emotions. [MO]

bewegingh · beroerte


Quotation

Ghelijck dan de oude Konstenaers een seer treffelicke maniere van wercken ghehadt hebben, soo hadden sy mede een sonderlinghe gaeve om sich de waere verbeeldinghe van allerley beweghinghen onses ghemoeds op ’t aller levendighste voor te stellen; ja wy moghen ’t oock vrijelick daer voor houden, dat sy haere wercken nimmermeer met sulcke bequaeme uytdruckinghen van de verscheydene herts-tochten souden vervult hebben, ’t en waer saecke dat sy met pijne waerd gheacht hadden alle die naturelicke beroerten wijslick nae te speuren door de welcke ons ghemoed verruckt ende den gewoonlicken schijn onses wesens verscheydenlick verandert wordt. Zeuxis heeft de schilderije van Penelope gemaeckt, so dat hy de sedigheyd haeres eerbaeren wesens daer in konstighlick schijnt uytghedruckt te hebben. Plin. XXXV.9. Timomachus heeft den raesenden Aiax afghemaelt, en hoe hy sich in dese uytsinnighe dolligheyd al aenstelde Philostr. Lib. II. de vita Apollonii. Cap. 10. Silanion heeft den wrevelmoedighen Konstenaer Apollodorus ghemaeckt; ende overmids desen Apollodorus eenen rechten korselkop was, soo ist dat Silanion niet alleen den Konstenaer selver, maer sijn koppighe krijghelheydt met eenen oock in ’t koper heeft ghegoten Plin. XXXIV.8. Protogenes heeft Philiscus geschildert, als wesende met eenighe diepe bedenckinghen opghenomen Plin. XXXV.10. Praxiteles heeft Phryne ghemackt, als of men haer weelderigh herte in een volle Zee van vreughd en wellust sach swemmen, Plin. XXXIV.8. Parrhasius maeckten eenen jonghelingh die in sijne wapenrustinge om strijd loopt, Plin. XXXV.10. Den Anapanomenos van Aristides sterft uyt liefde van sijnen broeder, Plin. ibidem. Philostratus {Iconoum Lib. I. in Ariadne} beschrijft ons de schilderije van eenen Bacchus die maer alleen bekent wordt by de minne-stuypen die hem quellen. Dese exempelen gheven ons ghenoegh te verstaen, hoe grooten ervaerenheyd d’oude Meesters in’t uytdrucken van allerley beroerten ende beweghinghen ghehad hebben;

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Just like the old Artists had a very striking manner of working, as such they had a special gift to imagine the true representation of all sorts of movements of our mind in the most lively way; yes we may also interpret freely, that they would never have filled their works again with such able expressions of the different passions, if they had not have thought it painfully worthful to wisely trace all those natural commotions by which our mind delights and the common appearance of our being is changed varyingly. Zeuxis has made a painting of Penelope, in a way that he appears to have artfully depicted the modesty of her being. Plin. XXXV.9. Timomachus has depicted the raging Aiax, and how he behaved in this outrageous madness Philostr. Lib. II. de vita Apollonii.Cap. 10. Silanion has made the resentful Artist Apollodorus; and as this Apollodorus was a grumpy guy, Silanion did not only cast the Artist himself, but also his stubborn touchiness Plin. XXXIV.8. Protogenes has painted Philiscus, being taken by deep reflections Plin. XXXV.10. Praxiteles has made Phyrne, as if one saw her luxuriant heart bathe in a great see of happiness and lust, Plin. XXXIV.8. Parrhasius made a young man who is walking around in his armour looking for a fight, Plin. ibidem. Philostratus {…} describes a painting to us of a Bacchus who can only be recognized by the heartaches that torture him. These examples illustrate clearly enough, how big a skill the old Masters have had in expressing all sorts of commotions and movements;

Only the citations are mentioned in the Latin edition, but there is no commentary, like in the Dutch and English edition. [MO]

bewegingh · beroerte


Quotation

De bequaeme uytdruckinghe van d’allerstercte herts-tochten en d’aller beweghelickste beroeringhen plaght maer allenlick uyt een verruckt ende ontroert herte, als uyt eenen levendighen rijcken springh-ader, overvloedighlick uyt te borrelen, en sich over ’t gantsche werck soo krachtighlick uyt te storten, dat d’aenschouwers door ’t soete gheweld van eenen aenghenaemen dwangh even de selvighe beweghinghen in haere herten ghevoelen die den werckende Konstenaer ghevoelt heeft.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] The adequate expression of the strongest passions and the most moving stirrings tend to only spring forth abundantly from an excited and moved heart, as from a lively rich source, and spread itself so powerful over the whole work, that because of the sweet violence of a pleasing force the spectators briefly feel in their hearts the same movements that the working Artist has felt.

beroeringh


Quotation

Weynige worden der (met eenigh Oordeel begaeft zijnde) ghevonden, die vande inbeeldinghskracht soodanigh zijn misgedeelt, ofte sullen in het lesen der Verhael-schriften en Vertellingen, d’eene of d’andere goede Denck-beelden by haer selven gewaer worden. Laet een aendachtigh Jongelingh de Troyaense Oorlogen inde Boecken AEneas, door den vermaerden Maro Gedicht, eens met opmerckingh door-lesen, ick houde my verseeckert, dat hy sijn gedachten met wonderlijcke bedenckingen vervult, sijn fantasie vol groote inventien afgescherst, ende sijn gemoet tot uytdruckingh van menigerley hartstoghten aengeprickelt vinden sal;

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Few can be found (being blessed with some Judgement), who are not gifted with the power of imagination, or will recognize some or other Idea in themselves when reading the Stories and Tales. Let a discerning Young man read through the Trojan Wars in the books Aeneas, poeticized by Vergil, I am certain that he will fill his mind with wonderful thoughts, sketches his fantasies full of great inventions, and will find his mind incited to the expression of many passions;


Quotation

Indien yemandt waerlijck den naem van een groot Meester verdient, en dat sijne Wercken vol vande ware deught der Konste konnen ge-oordelt worden, en dat sy alle nootwendigheden, soo van goede Teyckeningh en proportie, behoorlijcke reddinge en houdinge in haer hebben, die over een komen met de Plaets van ’t licht, in welcke de voorwerpselen zijn; en dat de schaduwen en dagen geschickt zijn, na de occasie van welcke sy werden voort gebracht; en dat voorts alle de Beelden gedisponeert en gecoloreert zijn, na den inhout van de Historye diemen wil vertoonen; daer-en-boven datse aendachtigh ende werckelijck hun doeningen en hertstoghten voort-brengen, die met haer gansche standt overeen komen; soo machmen wel op sijn Konst vertrouwen, nochtans nedrigh van herten, en ghemeensaem van ommegangh wesen: {Wat d’hovaerdy dickwils te wege brenght.} Want de hovaerdy maeckt onse Vyanden listigh, om met Leugenen en quade parten, onsen goeden naem en faem te ondermijnen; die niet als door sich wel ende loffelijck ontrent mindere Meesters te dragen, en konnen overwonnen worden.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] If someone truly deserves the name of great Master, and that his Works are judged to be filled with the true virtue of Art, and that they have all the necessities such as good Design and proportion, acceptable distribution of colors and harmony in them, that coincide with the location of the light, in which the objects are placed; and that the shadows and lights are appropriate, after the occasion in which they originate; and that furthermore all the Figures are placed and colored after the content of the History that one wants to portray; moreover that they produce their actions and passions carefully and naturally, which coincide with their whole pose; as such one may trust his Art, yet be humble of heart and social in interaction: {What pride often generates.} Because pride makes our enemies deceitful, to undermine our good name and fame with Lies and evil guiles; which can only be defeated by behaving oneself honorable with regard to the lesser Masters.


Quotation

Van de Stelling der Beelden volgens de Natuurlijke en toevallige stand der beweging in allerhande Doening.
Laat ons van de Tronie-stelling in ’t bysonder tot een ander voornaam en algemeen Deel der Mensch-kunde over gaan; Namelijk tot de Teykenkonstige stelling van de bewegende Stand der Werkende Mensch-beelden; En daar ontrent aanwijsen hoedanig de Beelden onder sekere Linie van Bestuur en Gewigt, en Tegen-wigt allerhande Doeningen en Actien van Staan, Gaan, Loopen, Torssen, Dragen, Werpen, als anders, welvoegsaam en Natuurlijk, sonder daar heen te vallen, of onmogelijkheyd in haar Doening te vertoonen, verrigten konnen: Op dat den Teykenaar en Schilder die sigh daar in wel afgerigt bevind, het Middel mogt in de Hand hebben, om sijn Beelden in allerhande voorval en Verkiesing, tot het Oogmerk van sijn voorgesteld bedrijf, soodanig te bepalen, datse noit tegen de Teykenkundige Trek, noch tegen de mogelijkheyd der Doening, ten opsigt van ’t Maaxel en samen-stel der Leden aanloopen. En gelijk dit een van de gewigtigste Hoofd-stukken der Schilder-Konst is, soo heeft het ook alle Groote en Verstandige Meesters niet alleen ter Herten gegaan, sig hier in wijselijk te dragen, maar veele hebben ook met alle vlijd hun Leerlingen geduurig vermaand daar op nauw agt te geven: En dat wel soo veel te meer alsse sigh ontblood vonden van de Onderwijsingen in de Boeken, en Voor-beelden.
Karel van Mander die beter Schrijver en Prater dan Schilder is geweest, seyde in sijnen tijd dat het te wenschen waar, datter van ymand een Onderwijsing aangaande de stelling der Beelden, volgs de Werkende Verkiesingh der Actien, en d’uytdrukking der Herts-togten, ontworpen wierde: En seyd hy, ik soude sulx geerne selfs gedaan hebben, in dien ik my daar bequaam toe gevonden had.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] On the Composition of Figures according to the Natural and incidental posture of movement in all sorts of Action. Let us proceed from the composition of the Face in specific to another important and common Part of the Anatomy; Namely to the Artful composition of the moving Posture of Working human Figures; And in that context point out to which degree the Figures can carry out appropriately and Naturally, all sorts of Doings and Actions of Standing, Going, Walking, Hauling, Carrying, Throwing and others, within a certain Line of Conduct and Weight and Counter-weight, without falling or showing an impossibility in their Action: So the Draughtsman or Painter who finds himself well-trained in this, has the tools at hand to conceive his Figures such in all sorts of occurrences and choices, to the purpose of the proposed action, that they will never appear to be against the Draught, nor against the possibility of the Action, with regard to the Creation and structure of the Limbs. And as this is one of the most important Chapters of the Art of Painting, as such it has not only concerned all Great and Wise Masters, to act wisely in this regard, but many have continuously urged their Pupils with diligence to pay close attention to it: And even more so when they were without the Instruction in Books, and Examples. Carel van Mander, who was a better Author and Speaker than Painter, said in his time that it were commendable, that someone designed an Instruction regarding the composition of Figures, subsequently the Working Selection of Action and the expression of Passions: And he said, I would have been inclined to do so myself, if I had found myself capable of it.


Quotation

Van de Actien en Werkelijke besigheden der Beelden, en hoemen die volgens den aard der Voor-vallen, onder d’uytdrukking van allerhande Passien en Ziel-togten vertoonen zal.
Seker vermaard Schilder plagt van de Beelden die haar behoorlijke Actien en Passien tot het voornemen van den Schilder, noch den inhoud der Historie niet wel uyt en drukten, te seggen, datse tweemaal gedoodverwd waren. {Omdat de Konst-beelden de beweging derven, moetmense door de Actien en stelling sulx doen aannemen.} Seker nadien het alle Konstenaars bekend is, dat de na-gebootste Werken, de ware en Levende beroerlijkheyd uyt haar eygen aard en Natuur derven, soo vald het niet swaar te oordeelen, datter in de Schilder-Konst een bysondere vlijd moet aangewend werden, om beneffens de goede en vaste Teykenkundige Trek en schoone Proportie, ook de Actien en Hertstogten (dat is de bedrijvens kragt) door praktijk in de Beelden aan te wijsen; en alsoo te verbeteren ’t geen sy van Natuure missen. Want dat is de Ziel van de Schilder-Konst: En die Meesters welke daar in bysonder hebben uytgemunt, hebben ook altijd de hoogste Rang gehad.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Of the Actions and True movements of the Figures, and how one may show them according to the nature of the Events, while expressing all sorts of Passions and Emotions. A certain famous Painter was used to saying that those Figures that do not express their proper Actions and Passions to the intention of the Painter, nor the content of the History, are primed twice. {Because the Art-figures lack movement, one should make them obtain such through the Actions and posture.} Especially since it is known to all Artists, that the imitated Works, lack the true and Lively movement from their own character and Nature, as such it is not hard to understand that one should apply extra diligence in the Art of Painting, to also illustrate the Actions and Passions (that is the activity), besides the good and steady Draught and beautiful Proportion, in the Figures through practice; and as such improve that which they naturally lack. Because this is the Soul of the Art of Painting: And those Masters who excelled especially in this, also had the highest Rank.

passie · zieltogt


Quotation

Wy zijn altijd van gedagten geweest, datter tot d’uytdrukking van allerhande gevallige Actien en Hertstogten, uyt welk de beste voort spruyten, geen oeffening den Schilder nutter is; dan met goede opmerking vele dingen na ’t Leven af te schetsen; en voornamelijk die dingen, die hem by toeval, en in stilligheyd hier en daar voor komen;

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] We have always been of the opinion, that for the expression of all sorts of charming Actions and Passions, from which the best spring forth, no practice is more useful to the Painter; than to sketch many thing after Life with good observation; and especially those things, that occur to him by accident and occasionally in silence;


Quotation

Hier in komt u eerst voor een grondige kennis der gestalten of proportie, en der passiën of kenteekens der hertstogten te hebben, op dat gy aan uw beelden, niet alleen haar natuurlyke beweging weet te geven, maar ook waar uit deze onstaan, aan ’t oog kennen doed […]

[D'après DE LAIRESSE, 1787, p. 56:] Il faut d’abord que vous ayez une connoissance approfondie des proportions du corps humain, & des effets de passions, afin que vous sachiez, non-seulement donner à vos figures les attitudes & les mouvemens qui leur conviennent, mais que vous puissez rendre, en même tems, raison de ce qui vous détermine à les représenter de cette manière […]

passie


Quotation

Alle deze aangewezene hertstochten, konnen zonder de voor aangeroerde schikking der leeden, geen volmaakt beeld voortbrengen […] Maar myn meening is, deze hertstochten door de beweeging der leedemaaten uit te drukken, en dat ider lid ten dien einde diend, geschiedende zulks wanneer het lichchaam zig keerd of wend, de leeden sparrelende een vóór en de anderen achterwaards, de een om hoog en de anderen om laag.

[D'après DE LAIRESSE 1738, p.20:] But all these Passions together cannot produce a perfect Figure, without the Assistance of the Members […] But my principal intention is, to express these Passions by the Motion of the Members ; and to shew how each Member contributes towards them : As when the Body turns or winds, the Members stir, one advancing, another falling back ; one raised, others sinking