AESTHETIC CONCEPTS → convenience, propriety, decency

LINKED TERMS

167 terms
49 sources
337 quotations

1 quotations

Quotation

d'Omstandicheden van bywerk, geven aen een historie geen kleyne welstant,
en der zelver verscheydenheyt verlusticht het aenzien.
Verscheidenheyt, in veel veranderingen/
By een gevoegt, en by werk geeft de dingen/
Een luister : [...]

[BLANC J, 2006, p. 254] Les circonstances de la partie accessoire d'une histoire lui confèrent une grande [ndr: convenance]. Et leur variété divertit le regard. / En ajoutant de la variété [à une histoire] grâce à de nombreux changements, / Et en l'agrémentant d'une partie accessoire, on lui donne du lustre.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → ornement
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

1 quotations

Quotation

Tous les desseins se divisent en cinq espèces ; il y a des pensées, des desseins arrêtés, des études, des Académies, & des cartons. [...] On donne le nom d’académies à des figures faites d’après nature, dans les attitudes convenables à la composition d’un tableau, pour en avoir exactement le nu & les contours ; on drappe ensuite ces figures, de manière à caresser toujours ce nu, & à le faire deviner. Rien ne fait mieux connoître la correction d’un maître que ces sortes de desseins ; ils prouvent en même temps sa capacité dans l’anatomie.



Other conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique du dessin

1 quotations

Quotation

Ce n’est pas seulement par differentes qualités de figures qu’on allie diverses persones, sous differents aspects ; mais la meme persone le plus souvent se diversifie aussi. Car autrement on doit representer Cesar comme Consul, que comme Capitaine, ou Empereur. De meme en peignant Hercule, le peintre se le figurera d’une certaine maniere combattant avec Anthée, d’un’ autre maniere quand il porte la coeffe, dans un autre posture quand il caresse Dejanire, & diversement lorsqu’il va chercher son Hilas : cependant toutes ces actions & toutes ces attitudes doivent toujours conserver les convenances d’Hercule, & de Cesar. Il faut aussi prendre garde de bien s’accorder dans un meme corps ; c’est a dire de ne point faire une partie charnûe, & l’autre maigre, une pleine de muscles, & l’autre delicate, & gresle : Il est vrai pourtant que si la figure fait une action qui sente la fatigue, soit qu’elle porte un poids, ou remüe un bras, ou autre membre, dans la partie qui fatigue par le poids, ou par le mouvement, il faut que les muscles forcent bien plus, que dans celle qui repose, mais non pas d’une maniere qui paroisse choquante.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Ce n’est pas seulement par differentes qualités de figures qu’on allie diverses persones, sous differents aspects ; mais la meme persone le plus souvent se diversifie aussi. Car autrement on doit representer Cesar comme Consul, que comme Capitaine, ou Empereur. De meme en peignant Hercule, le peintre se le figurera d’une certaine maniere combattant avec Anthée, d’un’ autre maniere quand il porte la coeffe, dans un autre posture quand il caresse Dejanire, & diversement lorsqu’il va chercher son Hilas : cependant toutes ces actions & toutes ces attitudes doivent toujours conserver les convenances d’Hercule, & de Cesar. Il faut aussi prendre garde de bien s’accorder dans un meme corps ; c’est a dire de ne point faire une partie charnûe, & l’autre maigre, une pleine de muscles, & l’autre delicate, & gresle : Il est vrai pourtant que si la figure fait une action qui sente la fatigue, soit qu’elle porte un poids, ou remüe un bras, ou autre membre, dans la partie qui fatigue par le poids, ou par le mouvement, il faut que les muscles forcent bien plus, que dans celle qui repose, mais non pas d’une maniere qui paroisse choquante.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

4 quotations

Quotation

Of a Graceful Posture.


The second thing in good Pictures is their
graceful Posture and Proper Actions ; that is, that the true and natural Motion of every thing be expressed in the Life and Spirit of it, that is, to quicken the Life by Art ; as in a King, to express the greatest Majesty by putting or designing him in such a Graceful posture, that may move the Spectators with Reverence to behold him. […]. So in all your Draughts the Inward Affections and Dispositions of the Mind may be most lively exprest in the Outward Action and Gesture of the Body. Now to attain to the Knowledge of this, you ought most diligently to observe the Works of several Famous Masters, and also to follow their Examples, who were used to delight themselves in beholding the Eyes of Private Murtherers, the Actions and Carriages of Wrestlers, and those that fought at Cuffs ; to observe the Actions of Stage-Players, the Inticing Allurements of Curtizans ; and for Thieves that are led to Execution, to mark the Contracting of their Brows, the Motions of their Eyes, and the Carriage of their whole Bodies, to the end they may express them to the Life in their Drawings and Works.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

The Passions of the Minde are certain Motions, proceeding from the Apprehension of Something : and are either Sensitive, Rationall or Intellectual. Sensitive is, when we consider Good and Evil as Profitable or Unprofitable, Pleasant or Offensive. Rational, when we Consider good and Evil as Virtue or Vice ; Prayse or Disprayse ; and Intellectual, when we regard them as True or False.
[...].
            The
Artist is therefore diligently to observe that he is not only to show the Passion by Contraction, Dilation, &c. of Features, but likewise to adapt a Complexion sutable to the Character the Figure is to bare in the Design, whither a Soldier, a Lover, a Penitent, &c. as for Example.
            A
Martialist should have a Meager Body with large rays’d and hard Limbs, Great Bones well Knit with Joynts, the Complexion Swarthy with an adult, Red, large Eyes, Yellowish like a Flame of Fire, wide Nostrels, a wide Mouth, thick and purplelish Lips, small Ears, [...].
            Thus he that can express the
Propertys of one Complection may easily conceive of the Rest, since all Natural Things have a Correspondency in Method, Form, Proportion, Nature, aad Motion ; which Philosophically understood bring a Certain knowledg of all Passion and Action to be imagin’d in Bodys.
            For most Certain it is that those
Passions of the Minde, whence these Externall Actions flow, discover themselves more or less as the Bodys have Affinity with any of the four Complections arising from the four Elements.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

In Expression we must Regard the Sex, Man must appear more Resolute and Vigorous, his Actions more Free, Firm and Bold ; but Womans Actions more Tender, Easy and Modest.
            We must likewise Regard the
Age, whose different Times and Degrees carry them to different Actions, as well by the Agitations of the Minde as the Motions of the Body.
            We must also take Notice of the
Condition, if they be Men of great Extent and Honour, their Actions must be Reserv’d and Grave ; but if Plebeians, more Rude and Disorderly.
           
Bodys Deifyd must be Retrench’d of all those Corruptible Things which serve only for the Preservation of Humane Life, as the Veins, Nerves, Arterys ; and taking onely what serve for Beauty and Form.
            We must likewise observe to give to
Man Actions of Understanding ; to Children, Actions which only Express the Motions of their Passions ; to Brutes, purely the Motions of Sence.
[...].
            Nor is it sufficient that we observe
Action and Passion in their own Natures, in the Complection and Constitution ; in the Age, Sexe, and Condition : but we must likewise observe the Season of the Year in which we express them.
            The
Spring ; Merry, Nimble, Prompt and of a good Colour. The Summer, causeth Open and Wearisome Actions, Subject to sweating and Redness. Automn, Doutbfull, and something Inclining to Melancholly. Winter, Restrain’d, drawn in and Trembling.
[...].



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions

Quotation

Too force Atittudes must be avoided, which cause extravagant Contorsions : but the boldest Action are allowed (not exceeding Nature) which may be advantagious to the Design.
           
Wee must avoid an Injudicious Mixture of Passions, which will disturbe the Harmony of the Picture ; as the mixing Anxiety, and Roughness, with Chearfullness, Clemency, &c.
            We should never Express a Figure without first examining the Action from the Life ; since in every Action there is some Alteration in the Muscles, Joynts, Contorsions, &c.
            Passions must not only be form’d in the Features and Actions, but suited, also, to fit Constitutions and Complections.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

3 quotations

Quotation

La belle Composition dans l’art du Peintre, est la partie qui invente, qui dispose, qui embelit, qui donne la grace & l’expression, & qui prononce l’ouvrage. On pourroit apeller cette partie de la Peinture, un assemblage élegant de plusieurs parties qui font un tout, & de plusieurs corps respectez avec leur plan & leur fond sur une superficie, par le concours de plusieurs couleurs. […] c’est à la composition de donner l’elegance à toute sorte d’imitations, comme c’est au Dessein d’en regler la proportion, & au Coloris d’y ajouter la couleur. En un mot c’est la faculté, l’art de se servir du Dessein et du Coloris avec elegance, en imitant les corps visibles tels qu’ils sont ou qu’ils peuvent étre dans leur plus bel agreément. […]



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → grandeur et noblesse

Quotation

Tant il est vray que l’œil aime la varieté & le Contraste dans cét Art, & que le feu & la grace ne sont qu’un certain assaisonnement qui releve le naturel. En éfet ce que l’on apelle la bonne grace consiste principalement en un certain agreément, une certaine Noblesse qu’on trouve dans les yeux, dans les visages, dans l’Atitude, & dans les Contours d’une figure, lorsque la Forme, l’Action, les Draperies, sont decentes & convenables à l’âge, au sexe, & à la personne qu’on veut representer, d’où resulte la beauté et la grace. Enfin cette beauté & cette grace toujours mélées ensemble font la belle composition des figures et le comble de la perfection dans la Peinture.

Le terme d'agrément est utilisé pour signifier la grâce et l'élégance des formes, des attitudes, des actions des figures peintes de manière adéquate à leur âge, sexe etc...

noblesse · grâce



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → grandeur et noblesse

Quotation

[…] Il faut de plus, qu'elle [ndr : l’attitude] ait un tour, qui sans sortir de la vraisemblance, ni du caractere de la personne, jette de l’agrément dans l'action.
En effet, il n’y a rien dans l’imitation où l’on ne puisse faire entrer de la grace, ou par le choix, ou par la maniere d’imiter. Il y a de la grace dans l’expression des vices comme dans celle des vertus. […] En un mot la connoissance du caractere qui est attaché à chaque objet, & qui regarde principalement les sexes, les âges, & les conditions, est le fondement du bon choix, & la source où l’on puise les graces convenables à chaque figure.

grâce



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

3 quotations

Quotation

[ndr : le Père] Si le pinceau se meut sous une docte main,
Il nous fait distinguer l’Ibere du germain :
L’Irlandais blanc & blond, de ceux de la contrée
Où l’eau sans de grains d’or n’est jamais rencontrée :
Le barbare Affriquain, du noir More frizé
Et le Mahometan, du peuple Baptizé
Donnant l’air, la couleur, la Phisionomie.


Quotation

Are. Non seulement Albert Durer à manqué dans les vetements, mais encore dans les airs de têtes ; le quel parce qu’il etoit Allemand a peint en plus d’un endroit la Mere de notre Seigneur vëtue à l’Allemande, & pareillement toutes les saintes femmes, qui l’accompagnoient ; & il ne manque pas encore de donner aux Juifs des phisionomies Allemandes, & accompagnées de moustaches, & de cheveux bizarres, qu’ils portoient avec des habits à leur mode : mais de ces erreurs qui regardent la convenance, & l’invention j’en toucherai quelqu’une, lorsque j’en serai à la comparaison de Rafael, & de Michel Ange.



Other conceptual field(s)

MANIÈRE ET STYLE → le faire et la main
L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Are. [...] Rafael garda toujours cette honnêteté dans tous ses ouvrages, desorteque, quoiqu’il donne generalement à ses figures un air doux & gratieux, qui ravit, & enflamme ; neanmoins dans les visages de ses Saintes, & sur tout de la Vierge Mere du Seigneur il conserva toujours, je ne sais quel air de sainteté, & de divinité (non seulement dans les visages, mais dans tous leurs mouvemens) qui semblent ôter de l’esprit des hommes toute pensée mauvaise.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

2 quotations

Quotation

Are. Non seulement Albert Durer à manqué dans les vetements, mais encore dans les airs de têtes ; le quel parce qu’il etoit Allemand a peint en plus d’un endroit la Mere de notre Seigneur vëtue à l’Allemande, & pareillement toutes les saintes femmes, qui l’accompagnoient ; & il ne manque pas encore de donner aux Juifs des phisionomies Allemandes, & accompagnées de moustaches, & de cheveux bizarres, qu’ils portoient avec des habits à leur mode : mais de ces erreurs qui regardent la convenance, & l’invention j’en toucherai quelqu’une, lorsque j’en serai à la comparaison de Rafael, & de Michel Ange.



Other conceptual field(s)

MANIÈRE ET STYLE → le faire et la main
L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Enfin la vrai-semblance poëtique demande que le Peintre donne à ses personnages leur air de tête connu, soit que cet air de tête nous ait été transmis par des médailles, des statuës ou par des portraits, soit qu'une tradition dont on ne connoit pas la source, nous l'ait conservé, soit même qu'il soit imaginé. Quoique nous ne sçachions pas bien certainement comment saint Pierre étoit fait, néanmoins les Peintres & les Sculpteurs sont tombez d'accord par une convention tacite de le représenter avec un certain air de tête & une certaine taille qui sont devenus propres à ce Saint. En imitation, l'idée reçue & généralement établie, tient lieu de vérité.


1 quotations

Quotation

The Airs of the Heads in my Holy Family of Rafaëlle are perfectly fine, according to the several Characters ; that of the Blessed Mother of God has all the Sweetness, and Goodness that could possibly appear in her self ; what is particularly remarkable is that the Christ, and the S. John are both Boys, but the latter is apparently Humane, the other, as it ought to be, Divine.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions

1 quotations

Quotation

Sous le mot d’Ajustemens, je comprens les draperies qui habillent les personnes peintes, & la maniere dont elles sont accommodées.
Il faut que chacun soit vêtu selon sa qualité, & il n’y a que les ajustemens qui puissent faire en Peinture la distinction des gens […]



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait

1 quotations

Quotation

A l'égard de l'Allegorie, on dit, qu'il falloit considerer la difference qu'il y a entre des figures des divinités fabuleuses & des figures allegoriques, qu'à la verité, la fable est incompatible avec la verité : mais que ce seroit faire une injustice à un Peintre doüé d'un excellent genie de l'empêcher de joindre l'Allegorie à l'histoire pour en exprimer les mysteres, lors qu'on le peut faire sans nuire à l'intelligence du sujet, qu'il seroit à souhaiter au contraire, que les Peintre en ne negligeant rien de ce qui est essentiel à leur profession, appliquassent leur esprit à bien connoître le sens mystique des histoires aussi bien que le litteral, leurs ouvrages en seroient beaucoup plus considerables & satisferoient d'avantage la curiosité des Amateurs sçavans ; [...] d'où l'on conclut qu'un Peintre peut bien accompagner l'expression de son sujet de quelques figures allegoriques pour marquer & citer le lieu, où il se rencontre, mais comme par des statuës qui n'ont nulle part aux mouvements des figures qui expriment le sujet, que n'ayant que cette sorte de langage pour exprimer ses belles conceptions, il ne seroit pas juste de lui en ôter la liberté, c'est ce qui a fait dire que la Peinture est une Poesie muette, & la Rhetorique des Peintres.

Une partie de ce passage de Testelin est repris par Florent Le Comte dans son Cabinet des singularitez (...), plus précisément aux pages 42-43 de son édition de 1699-1700 (Paris, Etienne Picart & Nicolas Le Clerc, tome I, vol. I).



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → genres (généralités)

2 quotations

Quotation

[ndr : LE PEINTRE]
[...] l’on doit en cela estre tres-exact à observer toûjours l’air & la proportion de ces Sculptures antiques, suivant les divers âges, sexes, & conditions, & mesme ces fausses divinitez, pour bien exprimer plusieurs histoires ou fictions de la Metamorphose d’Ovide & autres Escrits des Poëtes tant Anciens que Modernes

L'air est associé à la proportion des sculptures antiques et à la notion de convenance par rapport au sujet



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

l’Antique n’est beau que parce qu’il est fondé sur l’imitation de la belle Nature dans la convenance de chaque objet qu’on a voulu representer.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → antique
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

1 quotations

Quotation

There is another Caution to be observed too in this Choice of Forms, which is, to keep a Judicious Aptitude to the Story ; for if the Painter, for Example, is to draw Sampson, he must not give him the Softness and Tenderness he would give to Ganimedes ; nay, there is a difference to be made in the very same Figure at different times : and Hercules himself is to be made more Robust, fighting with Anteus, than when he sits in Dejanira’s Lap. But above all, the Painter must observe an equal Air, so as not to make one part Musculous and Strong, and the other Soft and Tender.
           
There is another thing to be considered likewise upon the viewing of any Story ; which is, whether the Painter has used that Variety which Nature herself sets us a Pattern for, in not having made any one Face exactly like another, nor hardly any one Shape or Make of either Man or Woman. Therefore the Painter must also vary his Heads, his Bodies, his Aptitudes, and in a word, all the Members of the Humane Body, or else his Piece will Cloy, and Satiate the Eye.
            As for the Remainder of what belongs properly to that part called Design ;
we must consider if every Figure moves properly ; as, if a Figure be to strike, whether the Arm and all the Body show the vigour of such a Motion ; and the same if he is to Run or Dance ; and therein consists one of the greatest Masteries of the Art, and which requires some Knowledge in Anatomy, that the Muscles be rightly express’d. As for Shortnings, they are things of great Difficulty, and few understand the Beauty of them ; which is, so to cheat the Eye, that a Figure that in reality is not a Foot in length, shall seem to be five or six Foot long ; and this depends upon Opticks, and is most in use in Ceilings and Vaults.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Leur maintien [ndr : du pape et et du roi] grave et doux doit par nostre artifice
Paroistre magnanime et non plein de caprice.
La plus part du beau monde a dans ses fonctions
De la grace en son geste et dans ses actions.


1 quotations

Quotation

Le mouvement, action, ou actitude, est appellée par les Peintres l'ornement & la grace de la figure en sa position ou situation. De plus, elle est dite la fureur, l’esprit, ou l’ame de la figure. Cette beauté ou bien situation se divise en naturelle ou artificielle : j’appelle cette beauté naturelle en cette matiere, celle qui est propre à l'homme que l'on veut representer. […] La beauté artificielle est, lors que le prudent Peintre peignant un Roy ou Empereur fait leur portrait grave & plein de Majesté, quoy que possible ils ne l'ayent pas naturellement, ou quand il peint un Soldat plus remply de fureur & d'indignation qu'il n'estoit pas dans la meslée. […] c'est en cela que le Peintre fait voir l'excellence de son Art, representant non l'action que possible cét Empereur ou ce Pape faisoient ; mais bien celle qu'ils devoient faire, eu esgard à la Majesté & à la bien-sceance de leur condition.

Terme traduit par ARTIFICIALE dans Lomazzo, 1585, p. 31.

naturel



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Das 9. Capitel . Von der Stellung der Glieder/ und derer Verekürzung in einem Bilde.
Viel berühmte Mahler haben diesen Übelstande an stehenden und auch liegenden Bildern eingeführet, daß sie, wenn die rechte und lincke Hüffte auswancket, die Achsel selbiger Seiten erhoben. Da doch hingegen insgemein die Achsel der Seiten niedrig als die andere seyn soll: es soll auch jederzeit das Haupt, wenn es möglich, es sich nach der höchste Achsel wenden. Wenn zierliche fürnehme Bilder und nicht grobe Arbeiten zu machen sind, […]. Man soll im wenden und biegen der Glieder erbarlich bei der Natur-Zierde bleiben […]. 
Hingegen ist bey den Händen und Füssen mehr Freiheit erlaubet […]
Es ist allezeit die Natur für eine sichere Richtschnur zu halten. Die gehenden Bilder sollen nicht weiter schreiten, als eines Fusses-Länge von einen zum andern, die perfecten Antiquen haben allezeit ihre stehenden Bilder als wolten sie gehen, auch etwas wanckendt, sehr rühmlich und angenehm gestellet. 
Kürtzlich man hat in dergleichen Gemählden auf der Bilder-Natur, artige und wohlsittliche Verrichtung und Arbeit scharff zu sehen […]. Man hat auch auf der Personen ihre Leidenschaften, Amt und Beruff zu sehen, daß man gleich aus ihren Gesichte, Verrichtungen und Geberden ihre Unternehmungen erkennen möge.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

3 quotations

Quotation

L’Attitude doit être convenable à l’âge, à la qualité des personnes & à leur temperament.



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait

Quotation

Il y a deux sortes d’attitudes, l’une de mouvement, & l’autre de repos. Les attitudes de repos peuvent convenir à tout le monde, & celles qui sont en mouvement ne sont propres qu’aux jeunes personnes, & sont très-difficiles à executer ; parce qu’une grande partie des draperies & des cheveux doit être agitée par l’air, le mouvement ne se faisant jamais mieux voir en peinture, que par ces sortes d’agitations. Les attitudes qui sont en repos, ne doivent pas tellement y paroître qu’elles semblent representer une personne oisive, & qui se tient exprès pour servir de modéle. Et quoiqu’on represente une personne arrêtée, l’on peut, si on le juge à propos, lui donner une draperie volante, pourvû que la scene n’en soit pas dans une chambre ou dans quelque lieu fermé.
Il est sur-tout nécessaire que les figures qui ne sont point occupées, semblent vouloir satisfaire le desir de ceux qui ont la curiosité de les voir ; & qu’ainsi elles se montrent dans l’action la plus convenable à leur temperament & à leur état, comme si elles vouloient instruire le spectateur de ce qu’elles sont en effet ; [...]



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Ce n’est pas seulement par differentes qualités de figures qu’on allie diverses persones, sous differents aspects ; mais la meme persone le plus souvent se diversifie aussi. Car autrement on doit representer Cesar comme Consul, que comme Capitaine, ou Empereur. De meme en peignant Hercule, le peintre se le figurera d’une certaine maniere combattant avec Anthée, d’un’ autre maniere quand il porte la coeffe, dans un autre posture quand il caresse Dejanire, & diversement lorsqu’il va chercher son Hilas : cependant toutes ces actions & toutes ces attitudes doivent toujours conserver les convenances d’Hercule, & de Cesar. Il faut aussi prendre garde de bien s’accorder dans un meme corps ; c’est a dire de ne point faire une partie charnûe, & l’autre maigre, une pleine de muscles, & l’autre delicate, & gresle : Il est vrai pourtant que si la figure fait une action qui sente la fatigue, soit qu’elle porte un poids, ou remüe un bras, ou autre membre, dans la partie qui fatigue par le poids, ou par le mouvement, il faut que les muscles forcent bien plus, que dans celle qui repose, mais non pas d’une maniere qui paroisse choquante.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

1 quotations

Quotation

Are. [..] sur tout il [ndr : le peintre] doit toujours avoir egard à la qualité des personnes, aussi bien qu’à la nation, aux coutumes, aux lieux, & au tems : tellement que s’il a à peindre un fait d’armes de Cesar, ou d’Alexandre le Grand, il ne convient pas, que les soldats soient armés commeils [sic] le sont aujourd'hui ; car autres sont les armes des Macedoniens, que celles des Romains ; & si on lui donne à faire une bataille moderne, il ne faut pas qu’il la compose à la maniere antique […].



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire

3 quotations

Quotation

[...] mon Maistre me fist remarquer bien d’autres beautés que celles que les Cabalistes admirent dans les ouvrages de leurs Chefs : Car outre qu’il n’y manquoit rien de celles-là qui ne regardent que la pratique de l’Art, il m’y fist découvrir tant de science & d’étude, qu’il est presque aussi difficile de les exprimer, que de les imiter, à moins que d’avoir les mêmes connoissances desquelles ces rares Esprits se servoient, pour faire de si excellens Ouvrages.
            Il ne me parla point de la
Vaguesse du Coloris, de la Morbidesse des Carnations, de la Franchise du Pinceau, ny des autres termes extravagans à la mode de nos Cabalistes ; mais bien de la beauté, diversité, netteté & sublimité des pensées, de cette manière noble & majestueuse de traiter un sujet, de la discretion à le remplir dignement & convenablement à la verité de l’Histoire qu’il represente, & au Mode dans lequel il se rencontre ; de l’exacte & sçavante observation du Costume, dans laquelle ces anciens Maistres faisoient consister tout ce que la Peinture a d’ingenieux & de sublime ; de cette pointe d’esprit & de cet excellent genie, qu’ils faisoient paroistre dans leurs Ouvrages, dont les Ecrivains les ont loüés si hautement : De là suivoit la judicieuse & convenable disposition des lieux & des figures, la force & la diversité des expressions, l’élégance & le beau choix des attitudes, la diligence & l’exactitudes dans le dessein, la beauté & la variété des proportions, la position aisée & naturelle des figures sur leur centre de gravité ou équilibre, & conformément aux regles de la Perspective des Plans, qui est le lien & le soûtien de toutes les beautés de la Peinture, & sans laquelle elle n’est qu’une pure barboüillerie de Couleurs ; mais sur tout, cet agrément & cette grace admirable dans les mouvemens, qui est un talent autant rare qu’il est precieux.
            On pouvoit encore admirer la lumiere bien choisie, & répanduë avec discretion sur les objets, selon leur proximité ou éloignement de l’œil, & les accidens du lumineux, du Diaphane & du corps éclairé ; les differens effets des lumieres primitives & derivatives, l’amitié & la charmante harmonie (pour ainsi dire) des Couleurs, par leur degrés proportionnés de force ou d’afoiblissement, suivant les regles de la Perspective aërienne, ou par leur sympatie naturelle : Enfin, cette Eurithmie dans toutes les parties de l’Ouvrage, auquel elle donne son prix & sa valeur.
            Voilà une partie des veritables & solides beautés, que mon Maistre me fist observer dans les admirables Ouvrages de ces grands Hommes, qui ont charmé toute l’Antiquité, & dont le seul recit charme encor tous ceux qui l’entendent.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → merveilleux et sublime

Quotation

Tant il est vray que l’œil aime la varieté & le Contraste dans cét Art, & que le feu & la grace ne sont qu’un certain assaisonnement qui releve le naturel. En éfet ce que l’on apelle la bonne grace consiste principalement en un certain agreément, une certaine Noblesse qu’on trouve dans les yeux, dans les visages, dans l’Atitude, & dans les Contours d’une figure, lorsque la Forme, l’Action, les Draperies, sont decentes & convenables à l’âge, au sexe, & à la personne qu’on veut representer, d’où resulte la beauté et la grace. Enfin cette beauté & cette grace toujours mélées ensemble font la belle composition des figures et le comble de la perfection dans la Peinture.

grâce



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

l’Antique n’est beau que parce qu’il est fondé sur l’imitation de la belle Nature dans la convenance de chaque objet qu’on a voulu representer.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → antique
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

1 quotations

Quotation

In waare Geschiedenissen of Historien luistert het wat naau, en een vernuftig Meester zal hem wel wachten de betamelykheid te buiten te gaan, om de Lichamen van Man of Vrou, al te veel t’ontblooten, en voornamentlyk eerbare Vrouwen, op dat het niet tot een verkeerden zin mogt geduid werden, tegenstrydig met de waarheid, maar wel zo dat men behoorlyk onderscheiden kan welk een Lichtvaardig of Deugdzaam mensch zy. Inzonderheid de Bybelze Historien, of die van Plutarchus, Titus Livius en anderen.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] In true histories [ndr: in the Dutch text, two synonyms are provided] it is very important – and a clever master will be careful not to surpass the decency – to not uncover the bodies of men and women too much, and especially honorable women, so it will not be interpreted the wrong way, in contrast with the truth, but in such a way that one can easily distinguish who is a frivolous or virtuous person. Especially in the biblical histories or those of Plutarchus, Titus Livius and others.


2 quotations

Quotation

Dus ghebeurt het dat ons ghemoedt door de kranckheydt des oordeels verdonckert sijnde, niet en kan onderscheyden wat daer met de autoriteyt en rechte reden der bevalligheydt over een komt.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] And so it happens that our mind, darkened by the illness of judgement, cannot discern what coincides with the authority and true reason of gracefulness.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

Men moet de Schilder-Konst niet vergeten aan te merken datter driederley Proportien in agt te nemen zijn, die hoeveelse van malkander mogten verschillen, nochtans alle binnen de Palen der mogelijkheyd moeten gehouden werden. Daar is onses agtens een Natuurlijke en Maatredige Proportie; tot welke de Proportie des Welstaans, en de Bevalligheyd moet bygevoegd werden. En soo langh de Mensch beelden na een van dese dry Geslagten, of na alle dry te gelijk verstandelijk geleeft werden, sullense buyten Berisping zijn. De twee eerste staan altijd vast; en tot de laatste neemtmen alleen sijn toevlugt, wanneer de Natuurlijke Wet-maat ophoud, of ons dregd te verlaten, dat is, wanneerse in sekere Verkiesing soodanigen gratie noch verscheyde aardige Verkrampingen niet kan toelaten, als de noodsaak en welstand, van een sonderlinge Actie ons afvorderd; In welke gevallen men sich dikmaal belemmerd en bedrayt vind; {Wanneer en hoe de dryderley Proportien geoeffend werden.} Om genoeg te laten blijken datmen de Maatredige Proportie den Bons verlaat, moetmen ’t gebrek van dien so veel sien te bedekken datmen ten minsten d’ontbeering niet ligt ontwaar werd: of soo een verstandig Oog dat ontdekken kan; soo moet de Welgeschiktheyd en Welbedagte Actie soo Deugdsaam zijn, datse den Beschouwer geheel kan innemen, en verpligten die eer te prijsen dan te veragten. Want een verstandig Mensch kan seer ligt afsien, waar en in welke geval of noodsaak, men de Schilderkundige Vryheyd, heeft weten tot sijn voordeel aan te grijpen of waar het verstand heeft stil gestaan.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] One should not neglect to mention regarding the Art of Painting that there are three types of Proportion to take into account, which – no matter how much they may differ from eachother – nevertheless must all be considered to fall within the possibility. We believe there is a Natural and Mathematical Proportion; to which the Proportion of Harmony and the Gracefulness should be added. And as long as the Human Figures occur judiciously according to one of these three Types or to all three simultaneously, they will be without Reprimand. The first two are fixed; and one may only resort to the latter, when the Natural Law of Mesure seizes to exist or threatens to leave us, that is, when she cannot allow such grace nor different nice Contortions in a certain Decision, if the necessity and harmony of a special Action demands from us; In which cases one often finds himself impeded and obstructed; {When and how the three sorts of Proportion should be practiced.} To show sufficiently that one leaves the Mathematical Proportion, one should attempt to hide the flaws of it as much as possible so that at least the deprivation is not easily recognized: or so that a wise Eye can discover it; as such the well-composed and well-invented Action are so virtuous, that they can conquer the Spectator completely, and oblige him to praise it rather than to despise it. Since a sensible Man can easily understand, where and in which case or necessity one has managed to use the painterly Freedom to his advantage or where the mind did not function.

gratie



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion

1 quotations

Quotation

Le Coloris pour être acompli, demande non seulement l’union & l’entente des couleurs, mais encore la Fraischeur & la Vaguesse. […]
L’entente des couleurs s’y trouve [ndr : dans les ouvrages] aussi, lors qu’elles sont placées sans choquer : c’est à dire que rien n’y paroit aigre ou discordant : qu’il y a de l’Harmonie, de la Rupture, comme disent les Italiens, pour temperer les couleurs trop vives : Et voila ce qu’on apelle bien peindre, & savoir l’entente des couleurs.

entente des couleurs



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

13 quotations

Quotation

Le mouvement, action, ou actitude, est appellée par les Peintres l'ornement & la grace de la figure en sa position ou situation. De plus, elle est dite la fureur, l’esprit, ou l’ame de la figure. Cette beauté ou bien situation se divise en naturelle ou artificielle : j’appelle cette beauté naturelle en cette matiere, celle qui est propre à l'homme que l'on veut representer. […] La beauté artificielle est, lors que le prudent Peintre peignant un Roy ou Empereur fait leur portrait grave & plein de Majesté, quoy que possible ils ne l'ayent pas naturellement, ou quand il peint un Soldat plus remply de fureur & d'indignation qu'il n'estoit pas dans la meslée. […] c'est en cela que le Peintre fait voir l'excellence de son Art, representant non l'action que possible cét Empereur ou ce Pape faisoient ; mais bien celle qu'ils devoient faire, eu esgard à la Majesté & à la bien-sceance de leur condition.

Terme traduit par DECORO dans Lomazzo, 1585, p. 31.


Quotation

De garder la bien-séance
Observez la bien-séance en vos figures ; c’est à dire, dans leurs actions, leur demarche, leur situation, & les circonstances de la dignité, ou peu de valeur des choses selon le sujet que vous voulez representer […]
Du meslange des figures selon leur âge & leur condition
[…]
De la qualité des hommes les plus sortables aux compositions d'histoire
[…]



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition

Quotation

La face de la Vierge [ndr : peinte par Nicolas Poussin] invite le Chrestien
D’admirer de son corps le pudique maintien ;
Puis que ce rare ouvrier l’a mise avec aisance,
Sans que rien soit forcé, dedans la bien-seance.
Le manteau qu’elle porte a droit de nous charmer ;
Non parce qu’il paroist coloré d’Outremer,
Ma d’autant que les plis sont faits avec adresse,
Et font voir tout à coup, la force et la tendresse.
Certes c’est un chef-d’œuvre, et ce chef-d’œuvre est tel
Qu’il merite à bon droit qu’on l’ait mis sur l’Autel ;
Il n’est point de Tableau, qui d’abord ne luy cede
Et les beautés de cent luy tout seul les possede.


Quotation

{27. Des Prelats & des autres personnes serieuses.}
[ndr : Le P.] On ne doit jamais peindre une action bizarre
Sous l’hermine Royale et moins sous la Tyarre.
Sans cette bien-seance un excez de chaleur
Sous le bandeau Royal feroient [sic] un basteleur ;
[…]
Prens donc garde mon fils, ce que je dis,
Et fuy, si tu les peins, les gestes estourdis.
Voy comme la posture affable et temperée
Accompagne un Prelat dans sous sa chappe dorée.
[…]
Leur maintien [ndr : du pape et et du roi] grave et doux doit par nostre artifice
Paroistre magnanime et non plein de caprice.
La plus part du beau monde a dans ses fonctions
De la grace en son geste et dans ses actions.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

Il [ndr : Raphael] a toûjours conservé de la force & de la douceur dans tout ce qu'il a representé, il a sceu traiter ces sujets avec toute la convenance necessaire, soit en representant les coûtumes differentes des nations, soit dans les habits, dans les armes, dans les ornemens, dans le choix des lieux, & enfin dans tout de qui regarde cette partie de bien-seance, que Castelvetro nomme dans sa Poëtique il costume, & qui doit estre commune aux grands Poëtes & aux sçavans Peintres.

il costume · convenance



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → ornement

Quotation

{I. Precepte. Du Beau.} 
Cependant vous ne devez pas vous attendre que la fortune & le hazard vous donnent infailliblement les belles choses ; quoy que celles que nous voyons soient vrayes & naturelles, elles ne sont pas toûjours pour la bienséance & pour l’ornement : ce n’est pas assez d’imiter de point en point d’une maniere basse toute sorte de Nature ; mais il faut que le Peintre en prenne ce qui est de plus beau, *comme l’Arbitre souverain de son Art, & que par le progrès qu’il y aura fait, il en sçache reparer les defauts, & n’en laisse point échapper les beautez* fuyantes & passageres. […]


Quotation

{XXVI. La Scene du Tableau.} 
*Que l’on considere les lieux où l’on met la Scene du Tableau, les Païs d’où sont ceux que l’on y fait paroistre, leurs Façons de faire, leurs Coûtumes, leurs Loix, & ce qui fait leur Bien-seance.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition

Quotation

Que pensez-vous [ndr : Pymandre] que soient en comparaison du dessein toutes les autres parties, dont vous avez parlé avec tant d’éclat ; comme la bienséance, c’est à dire, la maniére de traitter l’Histoire avec toute la vraysemblance qu’elle demande ; la Perspective mesme, si vous voulez ; & j’y ajousteray encore les couleurs, & la maniere de traitter les jours et les ombres que j’estime beaucoup ? Toutes ces choses ne sont rien au prix du dessein, parce qu’elles ne subsistent que sur cette premiére partie, sans laquelle un Ouvrage ne peut estre plein que de grands défauts. [...] Cependant il y a bien de ces sortes d’Ouvrages qui ne sont d’aucune considération ; la bienséance qu’on demande dans les Tableaux, & qui est en effet necessaire pour la belle expression, & pour l’intelligence de l’Histoire, est une partie purement de speculation, ou plûtost de lecture & de memoire.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

Vous devez considerer le lieu où doit estre la Scene de vostre Tableau, la nation d’où sont ceux que vous y voulez faire paroistre, leur maniere d’agir, leurs habits, connoistre leurs Loix, & ce qui fait leur bienseance.


Quotation

C’est un effet de la prudence & du jugement du Peintre de connoistre ce que la bien-seance demande, & c’est un effet de son genie & de l’art de la bien faire après l’avoir connu.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Quelle beauté, quel décore, quelle grace dans le Tableau de Rébecca ? L’on ne peut pas dire du Poussin ce qu’Apelle disoit à un de ses disciples, que n’ayant pû peindre Helene belle, il l’avoit representée riche {Clem. Alex.}. Car dans ce Tableau du Poussin la beauté éclate bien plus que tous les ornemens, qui sont simples & convenables au sujet. Il a parfaitement observé ce qu’il appelle décore ou bienseance, & sur tout la grace, cette qualité si précieuse & si rare dans les ouvrages de l’art aussi-bien que dans ceux de la nature.

décor


Quotation

L’ABBE. J'en conviens, mais quelle necessité & quelle bienseance y a-t’il que ces personnages parlent, & que cette femme vienne montrer là sa chair ? [...] Cela est vray, si vous renfermez la qualité de Peintre à représenter naïvement quelque objet, sans se mettre en peine s'il y a de la vray-semblance, de la bien-seance & du bon sens dans la composition ; mais je ne croy pas que les Peintres vueillent renoncer à l'obligation d'observer des conditions justes & si necessaires dans tout un ouvrage. Quoyqu'il en soit, je soûtiens qu'en qualité de Peintre il [ndr : Véronèse] n'a pas mieux gardé l'unité qui doit estre dans la composition d’un sujet, qu'il l'a fait en qualité d'historien, puisqu'il a mis deux points de veuë dans son tableau, l’un pour le Païsage, & l'autre pour la Chambre, où le Sauveur est assis à table avec ses Disciples ; car l’horison du Païsage est plus bas que cette table dont on voit le dessus qui tend à un autre point de veuë beaucoup plus élevé ; faute de perspective qu'on ne pardonneroit pas aujourd’huy à un Ecolier de quinze jours. Je ne croy pas que nous ayons aucun de ces reproches à faire au tableau de la famille de Darius. C'est un veritable poëme où toutes les regles sont observées. L'unité d'action, c'est Alexandre qui entre dans la tente de Darius. L'unité de lieu, c'est cette tente où il n'y a que les personnes qui s'y doivent trouver. L'unité de temps c'est le moment où Alexandre dit qu'on ne s'est pas beaucoup trompé en prenant Ephestion pour luy, parce que Ephestion est un autre luy-mesme.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → règles et préceptes

Quotation

4°. L’expression qui consiste à representer naturellement les figures, leurs gestes & leurs passions, doit se faire avec précaution ; c’est-à-dire, que l’on doit dans les sujets que l’on veut peindre, avoir égard à la bien-séance, & ne pas permettre qu’aucune action indécente, & qui puisse blesser la modestie & la pudeur, s’y rencontre.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions

1 quotations

Quotation

But the Handling may be such as to be not only Good abstractedly consider’d, but as being Proper, and adding a real Advantage to the Picture : And then to say a Picture has such, and such good Properties, and is also Well Handled (in that Sense) is as to say a Man is Wise, Virtuous, and the like, and is also Handsome, and perfectly Well bred.
Generally if the Character of the Picture is Greatness, Terrible, or Savage, as Battels, Robberies, Witchcrafts, Apparitions, or even the Portraits of Men of such Characters there ought to be employ’d a Rough, Bold Pencil ; and contrarily, if the Character is Grace, Beauty, Love, Innocence, &c. a Softer Pencil, and more finishing is proper.



Other conceptual field(s)

MANIÈRE ET STYLE → le faire et la main

Quotation

Korton heeft zich niet binnende paalen van Matigheid gehouden, maar zonder onderscheid, de ruimten der ploojen ingevoerd; want de rokken of eerste onderkleêren (hebbende meer vryheid, en by gevolg haar eerste hoedanigheid, het zelve niet zo onderworpen zynde als de geslooten deelen) kunnen onmogelyk vol plojen wezen. Echter gebeurd het veeltyds dat eenige konstenaars, (van wat studie het ook mogen zyn,) wanneer zy in een ander iets zien dat hen behaagt, niet alleen het zelve zullen zoeken naar te bootsen; maar gemeenlyk tot buytenspoorigheid en overtolligheid vervallen: By voorbeeld, een naakt Schilder die de kloekheid van Karats wil opvolgen, zal meest, al zyn beelden ’t zy die oud of jong zyn, als een Herkules verbeelden, hakkende hier en daar stukken uit als of ’t een rotssteen was.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Pietro da Cortona did not stay within the limits of moderation, but filled the spaces of folds without distinction; because the skirt or first undergarments (having more freedom and thus their first appearance, not as suppressed as the closed parts) can impossibly be full of folds. However it happens often that some artists, (of whichever study they may be) when they see something in another that pleases them, will not only attempt to imitate it; but commonly fall into excessiveness and redundancy: For example, a painter of the nude who wants to follow the prowess of Carracci, will often depict all his figures whether old or young as a Hercules, cutting out pieces here and there as if it were a rock.

In the German translation, this term is captured within the description 'ohn bedächtiglich'. [MO]

overtolligheid
matigheid


3 quotations

Quotation

[…] Il faut de plus, qu'elle [ndr : l’attitude] ait un tour, qui sans sortir de la vraisemblance, ni du caractere de la personne, jette de l’agrément dans l'action.
En effet, il n’y a rien dans l’imitation où l’on ne puisse faire entrer de la grace, ou par le choix, ou par la maniere d’imiter. Il y a de la grace dans l’expression des vices comme dans celle des vertus. […] En un mot la connoissance du caractere qui est attaché à chaque objet, & qui regarde principalement les sexes, les âges, & les conditions, est le fondement du bon choix, & la source où l’on puise les graces convenables à chaque figure.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

Sa Venus au bain [ndr : de Vanlo] est tout à fait intéressante ; de même que la Vestale ; quoique ce dernier tableau soit un peu sec. On sent bien que M. Vanlo a voulu y fatiguer ses chairs le moins qu’il lui étoit possible, pour mieux exprimer le caractere de virginité qui étoit de son sujet ; mais on s’apperçoit en même-tems que la nature ne lui a pu servir en cette occasion ; & qu’il n’a pu peindre cet objet que d’idée, & comme un beau fantôme, que lui retraçoit son imagination. La question étoit de chercher un beau modele de Vierge, quelque part ; mais en bonne vérité où le trouver !



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

Quotation

Celui qui représente la continence de Scipion semble un peu mieux colorié ; mais pour le coup, M. Restout me permettra de lui dire que ce sujet ne lui convenait en rien. Il s’agissoit d’y caractériser dans tout son éclat, une personne célebre par la beauté dont les charmes étoient si forts & si puissans qu’il étoit comme impossible d’y résister : On relevoit parlà adroitement, le mérite de Scipion qui eut le courage prodigieux d’en triompher ? Point du tout ; on se contente de nous croquer ici séchement une matrone de la plus mauvaise grâce du monde ; & qui n’est remarquable uniquement que par sa laideur. Ce n’est point là ce qu’il falloit encore une fois, mais M. Restout ne pouvoit pas mieux faire dans ce genre. Cet Auteur devroit bien s’étudier à mieux connoitre ce qui lui est propre. Comment pouvoit-il nous donner quelque idée de la beauté, lui qui n’a pu, encore atteindre à nous représenter des caracteres simples & ordinaires ? Je n’en veux pour exemple que ses Tableaux de Dévotion, qui sont comme on sait le fort de cet Auteur. Cependant quelles attitudes dures & forcées n’y voit-on pas ? Quelles grimaces pour des expressions ? Quels airs de tête effrayans & bizarres !



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire

2 quotations

Quotation

Qu'appellez - vous correction du dessin, reprit Philarque, des contours bien proprement tirez, & un peu plus durs que le marbre mesme d'aprés quoy ils ont esté copiez ? J'appelle un dessin correct, repartit Caliste, celuy qui a précisément toutes ses justes proportions. Ce n'est pas peu, dit Philarque, quand il est affermi par une longue & belle pratique; permettez-moy neantmoins de vous dire que c'est un effet de la regle & du compas, c'est une démonstration & par consequent une chose où tout le monde peut arriver. Mais ce que j'appelle plus volontiers correction, & dont peu de Peintres ont esté capables, c'est d'imprimer aux objets la verité de la Nature, & d'y rappeller les idées de ceux que nous avons souvent devant les yeux, avec choix, convenance, & variété : choix pour ne pas prendre indifféremment tout ce qui se rencontre ; convenance, pour l'expression des sujets qui demandent des figures tantost d'une façon, & tantost d'une autre; & variété pour le plaisir des yeux, & pour la parfaite imitation de la Nature qui ne montre jamais deux objets semblables.



Other conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

[…] Il faut de plus, qu'elle [ndr : l’attitude] ait un tour, qui sans sortir de la vraisemblance, ni du caractere de la personne, jette de l’agrément dans l'action.
En effet, il n’y a rien dans l’imitation où l’on ne puisse faire entrer de la grace, ou par le choix, ou par la maniere d’imiter. Il y a de la grace dans l’expression des vices comme dans celle des vertus. […] En un mot la connoissance du caractere qui est attaché à chaque objet, & qui regarde principalement les sexes, les âges, & les conditions, est le fondement du bon choix, & la source où l’on puise les graces convenables à chaque figure.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

2 quotations

Quotation

{Objections sur le Coloris} Pour ce qui est du coloris, je l’ay tenu le plus fort et le plus beau qu’il m’a esté possible pour le sujet, & s’il n’est pas fraix [sic] au point que quelques-uns le pourroient souhaiter, je les supplie de considerer l’Histoire que j’ay representée […]



Other conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

Are. [...] Qu’on ne croie pas que la force du coloris consiste dans les choix des belles couleurs, come dans la belle laque, dans le bel azur, dans le beau verd, & autres couleurs semblables : parceque cellescy sont egallement belles, sans qu’on les mette en œuvre ; & le fin de l’art, est de savoir les emploier ou elles conviennent. J’ai connu dans cette ville un peintre, qui imitoit à merveille le camelot, mais il ne savoit pas en draper le nud, & il sembloit que ce n’etoit pas un habillement, mais un morceau de camelot jetté en hazard sur la figure. D’autres au contraire ne savent pas imiter la diversité des teintes des etoffes, mais ils appliquent seulement les couleurs crûes telles quelles sont, desorte que dans leurs ouvrages, on ne peut louer autre chose que les couleurs.
Fab. Il me semble qu’en cela il faudroit une certaine negligence convenable, desorte qu’on ne voit pas un trop grand brillant de couleur, ni d’affectation ; mais qu’on trouvât en tout un aimable accord. Car il y a des peintres qui font leurs figures si joliment polies, qu’elles paroissent fardées, & avec un arrangement de cheveux distribués avec tant de soin, qu’il n’en sort pas un seul de sa place ; ce qui est un deffaut, & non pas un merite ; parcequ’on tombe dans l’affectation, qui ote la grace a toutes choses. […] C’est aussi pour cela qu’Horace avertit qu’on doit retrancher du poeme les ornemens excessifs.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

1 quotations

Quotation

COLOURING
COLOURS are to the Eye what Sounds are to the Ear, Tastes to the Palate, or any other Objects of our Senses are to those Senses ; and accordingly an Eye that is delicate takes in proportionable Pleasure from Beautiful ones, and is as much Offended with their Contraries. Good Colouring therefore in a Picture is of Consequence, not only as it is a truer Representation of Nature, where every thing is Beautiful in its Kind, but as administring a considerable Degree of Pleasure to the Sense.
The Colouring of a Picture must be varied according to the Subject, the Time, and Place.
If the Subject be Grave, Melancholy, or Terrible, the General Tinct of the Colouring must incline to Brown, Black, or Red, and Gloomy ; but be Gay, and Pleasant in Subjects of Joy and Triumph. […]. Morning, Noon, Evening, Night ; Sunshine, Wet, or Cloudy Weather, influences the Colours of things ; and if the Scene of the Picture be a Room, open Air, the partly open, and partly inclos’d, or Colouring must be accordingly.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

4 quotations

Quotation

Friend,
            When a Painter has acquired any Excellency in
Desinging, readily and strongly ; What has he to do next ?
                        Traveller,
            That is not half his Work, for then he must begin to mannage his
Colours, it being particularly by them, that he is to express the greatness of his Art. ’Tis they that give, as it were, Life and Soul to all that he does ; without them, his Lines will be but Lines that are flat, and without a Body, but the addition of Colours makes that appear round ; and as it were out of the Picture, which else would be plain and dull. ’Tis they that must deceive the Eye, to the degree, to make Flesh appear warm and soft, and to give an Air of Life, so as his Picture may seem almost to Breath and Move. [...] Friend,
            Wherein particularly lies the Art of
Colouring ?
            Traveller.
Beside the Mixture of Colours, such as may answer the Painter’s Aim, it lies in a certain Contention, as I may call it, between the Light and the Shades, which by the means of Colours, are brought to Unite with each other ; and so to give that Roundness to the Figures, which the Italians call Relievo, and for which we have no other Name : In this, if the Shadows are too strong, the Piece is harsh and hard, if too weak, and there be too much Light, ’tis flat. I, for my part, should like a Colouring rather something Brown, but clear, than a bright gay one : But particularly, I think, that those fine Coral Lips, and Cherry Cheeks, are to be Banished, as being far from Flesh and Blood. ’Tis true, the Skins, or Complexions must vary, according to the Age and Sex of the Person ; An Old Woman requiring another Colouring than a fresh Young one. But the Painters must particularly take Care, that there be nothing harsh to offend the Eye, as that neither the Contours, or Out-Lines, be too strongly Terminated, nor the Shadows too hard, nor such Colours placed by one another as do not agree. 
           
Friend,
Is there any Rule for that ?
           
Traveller,
Some Observations there are, as those Figures which are placed on the foremost Ground, or next the Eye, ought to have the greatest Strength, both in their Lights and Shadows, and Cloathed with a lively Drapery ; Observing, that as they lessen by distance, and are behind, to give both the Flesh and the Drapery more faint and obscure Colouring. And this is called an Union in Painting, which makes up an Harmony to the Eye, and causes the Whole to appear one, and not two or three Pictures
.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
L’ARTISTE → règles et préceptes

Quotation

Friend.
 
            What is properly the Colouring of a Piece of Painting ?
 
                        Traveller.
 
           
It is the Art of employing the Colours proper to the Subject, with a regard to the Lights and Shadows that are incident to the Story, either according to the Truth of it, or to the Painter’s Invention : and out of the Management of these comes all the Strength, Relievo, and Roundness that the Figures have : ’tis hard to give Positive Rules here, it depending much on Practice ; but the most General is, so to manage your Colours, Lights, and Shadows, that the Bodies enlightned may appear by the Opposition of your Shadows ; which by that means may make the Eye rest with Pleasure upon them ; and also, that there be an imperceptible passage from your Shadows to your Lights.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → lumière

Quotation

Of EXPRESSION
Whatever the general Character of the Story is, the Picture must discover it throughout, whether it be Joyous, Melancholy, Grave, Terrible, &c. The Nativity, Resurrection, and Ascension ought to have the General Colouring, the Ornaments, Background, and every thing in them Riant, and Joyous, and the contrary in a Crucifixion, Interment, or a Pietà. [The Blessed Virgin with the dead Christ].
But a Distinction must be made between Grave, and Melancholy, as in a Holy Family (of
Rafaëlle’s Design at least) which I have, and has been mention’d already ; the Colouring is Brown, and Solemn, but yet all together the Picture has not a Dismal Air, but quite otherwise. […] There are certain Sentiments of Awe, and Devotion which ought to be rais’d by the first Sight of Pictures of that Subject, which that Solemn Colouring contributes very much to, but not the more Bright, though upon other Occasions preferable.
I have seen a fine Instance of a Colouring proper for Melancholy Subjects in a Pietà of Van-Dyck : That alone would make one not only Grave, but sad at first Sight ; And a Colour’d Drawing that I have of the Fall of Phaëton after Giulio Romano, shews how much This contributes to the Expression. ‘Tis different from any Colouring that ever I saw, and admirably adapted to the Subject, there is a Reddish Purple Tinct spread throughout, as if the World was all invelopp’d in Smould’ring Fire.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

COLOURING
COLOURS are to the Eye what Sounds are to the Ear, Tastes to the Palate, or any other Objects of our Senses are to those Senses ; and accordingly an Eye that is delicate takes in proportionable Pleasure from Beautiful ones, and is as much Offended with their Contraries. Good Colouring therefore in a Picture is of Consequence, not only as it is a truer Representation of Nature, where every thing is Beautiful in its Kind, but as administring a considerable Degree of Pleasure to the Sense.
The Colouring of a Picture must be varied according to the Subject, the Time, and Place.
If the Subject be Grave, Melancholy, or Terrible, the General Tinct of the Colouring must incline to Brown, Black, or Red, and Gloomy ; but be Gay, and Pleasant in Subjects of Joy and Triumph. […]. Morning, Noon, Evening, Night ; Sunshine, Wet, or Cloudy Weather, influences the Colours of things ; and if the Scene of the Picture be a Room, open Air, the partly open, and partly inclos’d, or Colouring must be accordingly.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

4 quotations

Quotation

[...] le Peintre devoit tellement assujettir toutes les parties qui entrent en la composition de son Tableau, qu'elles concourrent ensemble à former une juste idée du sujet, en sorte qu'elles puissent inspirer dans l'esprit des regardans des émotions convenables à cette idée, & que si il se rencontroit dans la narration de l'Histoire même, quelque circonstance qui y fut contraire, on la devoit supprimer ou si fort negliger quelle n'y pût faire aucune interruption, qu'on peut neanmoins prendre une discrette liberté de choisir des incidens favorables, ou quelque allegorie qui convienne au sujet pour la varieté du Contraste, mais que l'on doit éviter de faire paroître ensemble des choses incompatibles ; par exemple la verité des choses Saintes avec les Prophanes, ou paroître ensemble des personnes qui n'ont été qu'en des tems fort éloignés l'un de l'autre.

Une partie de ce passage de Testelin est repris par Florent Le Comte dans son Cabinet des singularitez (...), plus précisément aux pages 41-42 de son édition de 1699-1700 (Paris, Etienne Picart & Nicolas Le Clerc, tome I, vol. I).



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

C'est pourquoi Mr. le Poussain qui sçavoit bien choisir les circonstances, & les approprier aux sujets qu'il traitoit, s'en faisoit une regle, disant ordinairement qu'il donnoit à ses Tableaux un mode Frigien ; pour dire qu'il suivoit la seule idée du sujet principal, c'est ce qui se remarque aussi en tous ses Ouvrages, notamment en celui dont on venoit de parler [ndr : Eliézer et Rebecca] [...] ; voilà l'idée du sujet qu'il s'est proposé en cette action, à quoi il a tellement assujetti toutes les parties qui entrent en la composition de cet excellent Ouvrage, qu'il n'y a rien mis qui ne convienne à un sujet Nuptial, tout y est gay, riant, plaisant, & agreable, ayant affecté de ne mêler point en cette compagnie de vieilles femmes, mais seulement de jeunes filles ajustées très proprement & de parfaitement bonne grace, dont les Draperies forment des plis delicats, les couleurs belles, les proportions sweltes, qu'on pouvoit dire qu'il avoit disposé ce Tableau dans le mode Corinthien, comme il disoit souvent, faisant allusion à la pratique des Architectes, lesquels en construisants quelque edifice font dependre de l'ordre qu'ils auront choisi toutes les parties jusqu'au moindre ornement. [...] Que suivant ces exemples & de tous ceux des grands hommes qui ont excellé dans les beaux Arts, comme les Poetes dans leurs fictions & dans leurs Vers, les Orateurs, les Musiciens, lesquels assujettissent toutes les parties de leur composition à l'idée generale de leur sujet, & leur donnent un air si convenable, que tout ensemble exprime une passion ; qu'ainsi les habilles Peintres de l'Antiquité l'avoient pratiqué de même, selon le témoignage de Pline, qui en décrivant un Tableau des amours d'Alexandre de la main dAppelles, [...].



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition

Quotation

[...] Il est vrai que venant ensuite à l’examen des uns & des autres : Ils ont tous leur merite particulier. J’ay ouï méme dire à d’habiles Peintres que la Composition de Pader est tres-savante : Que ce qui donne d’abord de l’avantage à Voüet dans ce lieu, ne vient pas seulement de la regularité de son Dessein, & de la grace de ses figures. Mais de la Vaguesse, de la fraicheur de ses couleurs & de la liberté de son Pinceau : Que neanmoins Pader l’a surpassé par les fortes expressions dans la plupart de ses figures : On voit l’horreur du naufrage, & la crainte de la mort dans son deluge : On voit éfectivement rouler le Char de Joseph : On voit marcher les chevaux & sa suite, à travers une nombreuse multitude qui regarde cette Pompe : Au lieu que les expressions de Voüet sont un peu languissantes. Pour ce qui est de Tournier : On tient qu’il a trop imité le naturel dans ses Tableaux, & que sa Composition n’est pas assez noble.
            On pretend que Pader ne devoit pas historier son portrait dans la figure de Joseph, à cause qu’il n’etoit pas assez beau de visage ni de taille pour representer son Héros. Lors qu’il exposa ce Tableau, on murmuroit fort de la liberté qu’il s’étoit donnée : Les Artisans méme & le bas Peuple y trouvoient à redire : Mais l’on ne desaprouva pas le Portrait d’un de ses enfans dans la figure de ce Page qui est à côté du Char : Car sa jeunesse, & le personnage qu’il represente conviennent tres bien à cette Histoire. On remarque aussi une disconvenance assez sensible dans le Tableau du Deluge : Parce qu’on y voit une Tour élevée presque au pié d’une montagne ou haute terrasse, dont elle est dominée. Mais il ne faut pas être surpris à cause que le peintre ne suit souvent que son esprit & sa verve, & la Convenance est un point extremement delicat dans la Composition d’un’Histoire peinte, & qui depend absolument du jugement. Tournier au contraire a autant negligé la belle Composition qu’il a êté merveilleusement exact & correct dans le Dessein : Les fonds de ses Tableaux sont tous obscurs : Sa Bataille de Constantin, n’est qu’un Groupe assez confus : Quoi qu’on y remarque de belles figures à mesure que le naturel dont il s’est servi a été beau. A mon avis, ce Peintre avoit le talent merveilleux pour les Portraits, parce qu’il copioit exactement la nature dans ses figures.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition

Quotation

Art. […] Je dois dire aussi, car il ne faut pas taire la verité, que celui qui a travaillé dans la salle qu’on appelle d’en haut, aupres du tableau de la bataille peinte par Titien, s’est trompé dans l’histoire de l’excommunication lancée par Alexandre III. contre Frederic Barberousse. Aiant representé Rome dans sa composition, il me paroit qu’il a lourdement peché contre la convenance en y mettant un si grand nombre de Senateurs Venitiens, qui hors de propos sont spectateurs ; parcequ’il n’est pas vraisemblable qu’ils s’y trouvassent tous en meme tems, & ils n’ont rien à faire avec l’histoire. Au contraire Titien observa à merveille, & en perfection la convenance dans le tableau ou Frederic se baisse, & s’humilie devant le Pape, lui baisant les pieds : il y a peint judicieusement le Bembe, le Navager, & le Sannazare, qui regardent la fonction. Quoique le fait soit arrivé long tems auparavant ; il n’est pas extraordinaire qu’il ait imaginé les deux premiers dans Venise leur patrie ; & il n’est pas hors de toute vraisemblance que le troisieme s’y soit trouvé. Outre cela il n’y a pas un grand inconvenient qu’un des premiers peintres du monde conservât dans ses ouvrages la memoire, & les portraits des trois premiers poetes, & savans de notre tems, dont deux etoient nobles Venitiens ; & le troisieme avoit tant d’amour pour cette illustre ville de Venise, que dans une des ses Epigrammes, il la prefere à Rome.



Other conceptual field(s)

1 quotations

Quotation

Qu'appellez - vous correction du dessin, reprit Philarque, des contours bien proprement tirez, & un peu plus durs que le marbre mesme d'aprés quoy ils ont esté copiez ? J'appelle un dessin correct, repartit Caliste, celuy qui a précisément toutes ses justes proportions. Ce n'est pas peu, dit Philarque, quand il est affermi par une longue & belle pratique; permettez-moy neantmoins de vous dire que c'est un effet de la regle & du compas, c'est une démonstration & par consequent une chose où tout le monde peut arriver. Mais ce que j'appelle plus volontiers correction, & dont peu de Peintres ont esté capables, c'est d'imprimer aux objets la verité de la Nature, & d'y rappeller les idées de ceux que nous avons souvent devant les yeux, avec choix, convenance, & variété : choix pour ne pas prendre indifféremment tout ce qui se rencontre ; convenance, pour l'expression des sujets qui demandent des figures tantost d'une façon, & tantost d'une autre; & variété pour le plaisir des yeux, & pour la parfaite imitation de la Nature qui ne montre jamais deux objets semblables.



Other conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

1 quotations

Quotation

Draught is a Physical Line, or Lineal Demonstration ; and hath always some Dimentions, if it be never so slender : and serves to represent Bodys according to their Forms, Aspects and Scituation ; Limiting and Determining the surface of an Object ; and Making out the Several Parts, which are contain’d therein. For no Superficies can Exist, without being Terminated by Lines, Streight, Circular or Mixt.
            The
Extent of Draught is Immense ; for it is not only concern’d in all the Visible Things in Nature, but in all Things which the Fancy or Imagination can form any Idea of, that can be compris’d under the Figure of Body : nay, so vast is its extent, that it adventures to Dive into the very Soul, and express its Thoughts ; for though Colour is accessary to Expression, yet nothing can be Terminated without Lines.
            They that would arrive to the Perfection in the
Practick, must dilligently observe these following Rules.
            First he must draw by the Hand,
Circles, Ovals, &c. Then the several Features of the Face by themselves, [...] then the several Members, [...]. Observing in the Hands and Feet, to draw the upper Lines first then the lower ; [...].
            When he attempts a whole Body, he must begin with a Body standing Frontwise, [...].
            For
Rustick and Country Figures, the Contours must be Gross, Equally Counterhatch’d and Notch’d, without regard to extraordinary Neatness and Roundness.
            But for Grave and serious Persons, they must be rounded, noble and Certain ; not so at adventure as the foremention’d.
            They must be strong, Resolute, Noble, Perfect and Chose for
Heroes.
            They must be Puissant and Austere, full of Greatness and Majesty, for
Deifyd Bodys.
            And for
young Women and Children, the Contours must be Smooth, Round and Delicate.
            They must Design the Nudity, Model, &c. exactly, without Charging or overburthening any of their Parts ; their being no way to obtain an entire exactness, but by proportioning every part with the first, comparing them exactly, so that we may be at liberty to Strengthen and go over again the Parts as we shall think fit, when we make use of this Design ; as it truly follows and represents the Models whither they be Antique or Natural.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
L’ARTISTE → règles et préceptes

3 quotations

Quotation

Que suivant ces exemples & de tous ceux des grands hommes qui ont excellé dans les beaux Arts, comme les Poetes dans leurs fictions & dans leurs Vers, les Orateurs, les Musiciens, lesquels assujettissent toutes les parties de leur composition à l'idée generale de leur sujet, & leur donnent un air si convenable, que tout ensemble exprime une passion ; qu'ainsi les habilles Peintres de l'Antiquité l'avoient pratiqué de même, selon le témoignage de Pline, qui en décrivant un Tableau des amours d'Alexandre de la main dAppelles, [...].

APELLE, Amours d'Alexandre



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

L’Attitude doit être convenable à l’âge, à la qualité des personnes & à leur temperament.



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait

Quotation

Que vos compositions soient conformes aux coûtumes & aux tems, donnez-vous de garde que ce qui ne fait rien au sujet, & qui n’y est que peu convenable, entre dans votre Tableau, & en occupe la principale place ; mais imitez en ceci la Tragedie, sœur de la Peinture, qui déploye toutes les forces de son Art où le sort de l’action se passe : le sujet doit être fidelle, c’est-à-dire, il ne faut point mêler les Fables avec les Histoires saintes.
La forme des visages, l’âme, ni la couleur ne doivent pas se ressembler dans toutes les figures, non plus que les cheveux, parceque les hommes sont aussi differens, que les regions sont dissemblables.


21 quotations

Quotation

Et comme ce mot n’est pas un Terme particulierement affecté à la Peinture, mais qu’il est aussi commun aux Poëtes et aux Historiens, qui disent les mesmes choses que les Peintres ont accoustumé de representer ; je ne dois pas imputer seulement aux Peintres de nostre Nation, tout le reproche de n‘avoir pas encore donné de nom à cette excellente Partie de l’Art ; d’où il semble qu’on peut inférer qu’elle n’est donc pas conneüe ny pratiquée par eux. Il sera toûjours plus apropos et plus utile d’en expliquer le mystère, et de faire concevoir la force et la vraye intelligence de ce Costûme, qui est proprement à dire un Stile sçavant, une expression judicieuse, une Convenance particulière et spécifique à chaque figure du Sujet qu’on traitte : de sorte que ce mot bien entendu comprend, et veut dire tant de choses essentielles à nostre propos qu’il ne peut estre trop examiné ny trop expliqué.

costume


Quotation

Il faut donc qu’un Peintre qui aspire à quelque degré de gloire en sa Profession, soit fort exact à ce qui regarde le Costûme, et qu’il en fasse pour ainsi dire son capital, parce qu’il est généralement commun à nos cinq principes fondamentaux, et qu’il en compose l’Eurythmie de telle sorte, qu’on doit le considérer comme le Tout de ces cinq parties. Mais il se faut bien garder de croire que pour satisfaire à l’Intention du Costûme, ce soit assez d’eviter ces inepties, et ces lourdes fautes […] si outre cela on ne paroist ingénieux et sçavant dans l’Expression du Sujet qu’on traitte.


Quotation

Il [ndr : Raphael] a toûjours conservé de la force & de la douceur dans tout ce qu'il a representé, il a sceu traiter ces sujets avec toute la convenance necessaire, soit en representant les coûtumes differentes des nations, soit dans les habits, dans les armes, dans les ornemens, dans le choix des lieux, & enfin dans tout de qui regarde cette partie de bien-seance, que Castelvetro nomme dans sa Poëtique il costume, & qui doit estre commune aux grands Poëtes & aux sçavans Peintres.

bienséance · il costume



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → ornement

Quotation

Qu'appellez - vous correction du dessin, reprit Philarque, des contours bien proprement tirez, & un peu plus durs que le marbre mesme d'aprés quoy ils ont esté copiez ? J'appelle un dessin correct, repartit Caliste, celuy qui a précisément toutes ses justes proportions. Ce n'est pas peu, dit Philarque, quand il est affermi par une longue & belle pratique; permettez-moy neantmoins de vous dire que c'est un effet de la regle & du compas, c'est une démonstration & par consequent une chose où tout le monde peut arriver. Mais ce que j'appelle plus volontiers correction, & dont peu de Peintres ont esté capables, c'est d'imprimer aux objets la verité de la Nature, & d'y rappeller les idées de ceux que nous avons souvent devant les yeux, avec choix, convenance, & variété : choix pour ne pas prendre indifféremment tout ce qui se rencontre ; convenance, pour l'expression des sujets qui demandent des figures tantost d'une façon, & tantost d'une autre; & variété pour le plaisir des yeux, & pour la parfaite imitation de la Nature qui ne montre jamais deux objets semblables.



Other conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

Comme la connoissance des divers habillemens & leurs differens usages est une science de theorie, & que bien des gens sçavans dans l’histoire peuvent posseder, cela ne regarde pas l’art de peindre. Il n’est pas plus difficile à un Peintre de bien faire un vestement à l’antique, qu’un à la moderne ; un laticlave, qu’un habit de païsan. Et de mesme que l’on n’estimeroit guere celuy qui ne sçauroit que bien marquer ces differences dans ses ouvrages, aussi l’on ne doit point blasmer si fort ceux qui les ont ignorées, quand ils sont recommandables par d’autres qualitez. Il est vray que comme il est aisé aux Peintres de s’en instruire, ils sont moins excusables, lors qu’il manquent dans cette partie de convenance, qui devroit toujours estre observée dans tous leurs tableaux.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

Dans les deux Tableaux du frapement de roche combien de differentes actions noblement representées! On peut encore dans ces mesmes tableaux remarquer ce qu’il dit du costume, c’est à dire, ce qui regarde la convenance dans toutes les choses qui doivent accompagner une histoire.


Quotation

Quelqu’un de l’Academie prit de là occasion de proposer une question de sçavoir, ce que l’on doit entendre par le beau naturel, & en quoi consiste cette beauté, laquelle le Peintre doit imiter, disant que si l’on en devoit croire le sens naturel & commun, (les choses étant ordonnées dans une reguliere Cimetrie,) un air serein, des arbres fort bien dressés, un terrain uni, & des objets plaisants, lui paroissoient d’une très agreable beauté, qu’il pensoit que l’on devoit du moins approprier les choses à la nature des sujets, pour former la beauté d’un Tableau, par une convenance raisonnable, & que neantmoins il avoit remarqué dans les ouvrages de tres-habilles hommes une affectation de faire paroître les choses dans l’irregularité, le désordre & l’obscurité, comme l’on voyoit en beaucoup d’endroits des Bacchanalles representées en des lieux sombres & mal plaisants, contre l’usage ordinairement pratiqué par tout de chercher des lieux agreables pour les rejouissances

Le tableau tout comme le nom de Véronèse ne sont pas explicitement précisés, mais le rapprochement avec le Persée délivrant Andromède a été fait par Christian Michel et Jacqueline Lichtenstein dans les Conférences de l'Académie royale de Peinture et de Sculpture. Tome 1, Les Conférences au temps d'Henry Testelin 1648-1681, vol. 2. p. 614-615.



Other conceptual field(s)

Quotation

Et enfin la Composition comprend la faculté inventive, l'ordonnance des parties, & la Convenance, ou le raport de l'Ouvrage avec le tems, le lieu & le sujet.


Quotation

[…] Il faut donc convenir que ce que les Peintres entendent par le dessein, c’est la proportion des traits, & la Convenance entr’eux, pour representer les choses visibles, comme elles sont, ou comme elles peuvent être, dans leur plus grande perfection : De sorte que le Dessein est une faculté de l’entendement, qui consiste dans l’intelligence de la belle proportion : ou si vous voulez une sience pratique, qui dirige les operations de la main, lors qu’elle veut imiter les corps visibles dans leur proportion. Et c’est ce qu’on veut faire comprendre, lors qu’on dit qu’il y a beaucoup de dessein dans chaque ouvrage.
[…] Quand je dis que le dessein est une proportion : je pretens qu’elle tient ici le lieu d’une idée généralle, qu’on apelle le genre, parce qu’il y a plusieurs especes de proportion, savoir celle des nombres, celle des tons, & plusieurs autres ; & enfin celle que les Peintres apellent Dessein. [...]
En un mot la proportion est ce qui flate, & ce qui touche les yeux & la raison : Comme dans la Musique, les accords, ou les tons proportionnés les uns aux autres, flatent, & touchent l’oreille, par je ne sai quoi de juste & de piquant.
Enfin il y a dans toutes choses un certain assaisonnement, qui en fait la juste proportion. C’est aussi ce qui flate & touche, le goût dans le mets : et c’est pour cela que les Peintres se servent encore du mot de goût, pour signifier l’éfet que les ouvrages dont dans leur esprit. Ainsi ils disent souvent, qu’un tableau est du bon ou du mauvais goût : dessiner du bon goût, c’est à dire, parmi eux, donner des belles proportions.
Mais quoique nous puissions dire, il seroit impossible de donner la veritable raison de la proportion : On remarque qu’elle plaît par la convenance des parties avec le tout quelles [sic] composent & que les yeux & la raison la sentent & l’aprouvent.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion

Quotation

Tant il est vray que l’œil aime la varieté & le Contraste dans cét Art, & que le feu & la grace ne sont qu’un certain assaisonnement qui releve le naturel. En éfet ce que l’on apelle la bonne grace consiste principalement en un certain agreément, une certaine Noblesse qu’on trouve dans les yeux, dans les visages, dans l’Atitude, & dans les Contours d’une figure, lorsque la Forme, l’Action, les Draperies, sont decentes & convenables à l’âge, au sexe, & à la personne qu’on veut representer, d’où resulte la beauté et la grace. Enfin cette beauté & cette grace toujours mélées ensemble font la belle composition des figures et le comble de la perfection dans la Peinture.



Other conceptual field(s)

Quotation

Ce que les Italiens apellent Costume & Decore, qui sont des termes dont on se sert en parlant de la convenance, ne consiste pas dans les sentimens de la morale, que la peinture ne peut directement exprimer. Mais dans les actions exterieures, qui ont du raport à la condition, & à la dignité des personnes, qu’on doit toujours reconnoître dans leurs manieres. […] Il paroît, ce Decore, dans la Peinture par plusieurs circonstances exterieures que le Peintre observe dans les figures, à l’égard des cheveux, des habits, de la couleur, de l’Atitude, du geste, & de l’expression : Choses qui dependent d’un grand savoir, & d’un profond jugement.

decore · costume


Quotation

Il y a une proportion generale fondée sur les mesures les plus convenables pour faire une belle figure. On peut consulter & examiner ceux qui ont écrit des Proportions, & qui ont donné des mesures generales pour les figures humaines, supposé qu'ils ayent eux-mêmes consulté à fond & la Nature & la Sculpture des Anciens.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → groupe
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → antique

Quotation

l’Antique n’est beau que parce qu’il est fondé sur l’imitation de la belle Nature dans la convenance de chaque objet qu’on a voulu representer.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → antique
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

{Les Draperies} Que les Draperies soient bien jettées, que les plis en soient grands, en petit nombre autant qu’il est possible, & bien contrastées ; que les étofes en soient épaisses, ou légeres selon la qualité & la convenance des figures ; qu'elles soient quelquefois ouvragées & d'espèce différente & quelquefois simple, suivant la convenance des sujets & des endroits du Tableau, qui demandent plus ou moins d’éclat pour l’ornement du Tableau & pour l'oeconomie du tout ensemble.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

Are. [...] Commençons par l’invention dans la quelle je trouve, qu’il entre beaucoup de parties, parmi les quelles l’ordonnance, & les convenances sont les principales ; parceque si le peintre, par exemple, avoit à representer Jesus Christ, ou saint Paul prechant, il ne conviendroit pas, qu’il les peignit nuds, qu’il les vêtit en soldats, ou en mariniers ; mais qu’il leur choisit un habit decent ; & convenable à l’un, & à l’autre ; principalement qu’il donnât au Seigneur une phisionomie grave accompagnée de douceur, & d’une benignité aimable, de meme qu’à saint Paul un air qui conviene à un si grand Apotre ; de maniere que ceux qui les regardent s’imaginent voir des portraits fidels, tant de l’Autheur de notre salut, que de ce Vaisseau d’election.


Quotation

Are. Non seulement Albert Durer à manqué dans les vetements, mais encore dans les airs de têtes ; le quel parce qu’il etoit Allemand a peint en plus d’un endroit la Mere de notre Seigneur vëtue à l’Allemande, & pareillement toutes les saintes femmes, qui l’accompagnoient ; & il ne manque pas encore de donner aux Juifs des phisionomies Allemandes, & accompagnées de moustaches, & de cheveux bizarres, qu’ils portoient avec des habits à leur mode : mais de ces erreurs qui regardent la convenance, & l’invention j’en toucherai quelqu’une, lorsque j’en serai à la comparaison de Rafael, & de Michel Ange.

Dürer incarne dans cette citation celui qui n'a pas respecté les règles de la convenance dans le traitement des habits et des visages.



Other conceptual field(s)

MANIÈRE ET STYLE → le faire et la main
L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Are. Aussi Timante un des excellents peintres de l’antiquité, qui peignit Iphigenie fille d’Agamemnon, dont Euripide fit la belle tragedie, depuis peu traduite par le Dolce, & representée à Venise il y a quelques années ; la peignit, dis je, avant l’autel, ou elle attendoit d’etre immolée, & sacrifiée à Diane ; & aiant epuisé toutes les expressions de douleur sur le visage des spectateurs, & ne s’imaginant pas d’en pouvoir exprimer de plus forte sur le visage de ce pere affligé, il le fit qui se couvroit d’un linge, ou d’un bout de son habit : que Timante conserva bien la convenance, parcequ’Agamemnon etant pere, il sembloit encore qu’il ne devoit pas supporter de voir immoler sa fille à ses yeux.
Fab. Ce fut la, un accident bien trouvé.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions

Quotation

Art. […] Je dois dire aussi, car il ne faut pas taire la verité, que celui qui a travaillé dans la salle qu’on appelle d’en haut, aupres du tableau de la bataille peinte par Titien, s’est trompé dans l’histoire de l’excommunication lancée par Alexandre III. contre Frederic Barberousse. Aiant representé Rome dans sa composition, il me paroit qu’il a lourdement peché contre la convenance en y mettant un si grand nombre de Senateurs Venitiens, qui hors de propos sont spectateurs ; parcequ’il n’est pas vraisemblable qu’ils s’y trouvassent tous en meme tems, & ils n’ont rien à faire avec l’histoire. Au contraire Titien observa à merveille, & en perfection la convenance dans le tableau ou Frederic se baisse, & s’humilie devant le Pape, lui baisant les pieds : il y a peint judicieusement le Bembe, le Navager, & le Sannazare, qui regardent la fonction. Quoique le fait soit arrivé long tems auparavant ; il n’est pas extraordinaire qu’il ait imaginé les deux premiers dans Venise leur patrie ; & il n’est pas hors de toute vraisemblance que le troisieme s’y soit trouvé. Outre cela il n’y a pas un grand inconvenient qu’un des premiers peintres du monde conservât dans ses ouvrages la memoire, & les portraits des trois premiers poetes, & savans de notre tems, dont deux etoient nobles Venitiens ; & le troisieme avoit tant d’amour pour cette illustre ville de Venise, que dans une des ses Epigrammes, il la prefere à Rome.



Other conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition

Quotation

Are. Orfus nous devons considerer l’homme en deux manieres, c’est à dire nud, & vetu. Si nous le representons nud, cela se peut faire ou plein de muscles, ou delicat. […] Il est necessaire de garder aussi les convenances telles, qu’on les a marquées dans l’invention : parceque si le peintre veut representer un Samson, il ne doit pas lui donner la mollesse & la douceur d’un Ganimede, & s’il a un Ganimede à peindre, il ne doit pas chercher en lui les nerfs, & la force d’un Samson. Tout de meme, s’il represente un enfant, il doit bien lui donner des membres d’enfant ; & il ne doit pas faire un viellard qui ressemble a un jeune homme, ni un jeune homme qui ressemble à un petit enfant. Il est à propos que la même chose s’observe dans les femmes ; qu’on distingue un sexe de l’autre, & un âge d’un autre âge, & qu’on donne à chacun, les parties convenables.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Are. J’ai parlé de l’homme nud, je traitterai a present de l’homme vétu, mais en peu de mots ; parceque eu égard aux convenances, il faut, come j’ai dit, conformer l’habillement à l’usage des Nations & des conditions. Si le peintre represente un Apôtre, il ne le fera pas en habit court ; & s’il veut peindre un Capitaine, il ne lui mettra pas sur le corps une robbe, pour ainsi dire à manches pendantes. Quant aux etoffes, le peintre doit avoir egard à leur qualité ; parceque le velours fait d’autres plis, que ne fait l’ormessin ; & le lin bien delié, ne fait pas les mêmes plis qu’un gros drap : Il faut de même ranger les plis à leur place, en sorte qu’ils laissent voir le dessous, & qu’ils tournent adroittement du coté qu’ils doivent aller, mais non pas de manier qu’ils coupent, ou que le drap paroisse attaché à la peau. Et comme une trop grande secheresse rend la figure pauvre, & ne la rend pas gracieuse, de même trop de plis causent de la confusion, & ne plaisent pas. Il faut donc emploier ici ce milieu si estimé en toutes choses.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

Are. […] Venons à la convenance : Rafael ne s’en eloigna jamais. Mais il fit les petits* enfants tels qu’ils sont doüillets & tendres, les hommes robustes, & les femmes avec cette delicatesse qui leur convient.
Fab. Et quoi le grand Michel Ange n’a-t-il donc pas gardé aussi cette convenance ?
Are. Si j’avois envie de vous plaire, & à ses partisans, je dirois qu’oüi : mais si je dois dire la verité, je dirai que non. Quoique vous voiez bien dans les tableaux de Michel Ange la distinction en general des âges, & des sexes (ce que tout le monde sait faire) vous ne la trouverez pourtant pas dans l’arrangement des muscles. Je ne veux pas me mettre à critiquer ses ouvrages, tant par le respect que j’ai pour lui, & que merite un si grand homme, que parcequ’il n’est pas necessaire. Mais que direz vous de l’honneteté ? croiez vous qu’il soit à propos pour faire voir les difficultés de l’art, de decouvrir toujours sans respect les parties nûes des figures, que la modestie, & la pudeur tiennent cachées, sans avoir egard ni a la sainteté des personnes qu’on represente, ni au lieu ou elles sont representées ?
[…]
 
* Dans son tems Titien pour la tendresse le surpassoit beaucoup, & depuis François du Quenoi dit le Flamand.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

1 quotations

Quotation

Friend.
            I have heard, that in some Pictures of Raphael, the very Gloss of Damask, and the Softness of Velvet, with the Lustre of Gold, are so Expressed, that you would take them to be Real, and not Painted : Is not that as hard to do, as to imitate Flesh ?
                        Traveller.
            No : Because those things are but the stil Life, whereas there is a Spirit in Flesh and Blood, which is hard to Represent. But a good Painter must know how to do those Things you mention, and many more : As for Example, He must know how to Imitate the Darkness of Night, the Brightness of Day, the Shining and Glittering of Armour ; the Greenness of Trees, the Dryness of Rocks. In a word, All Fruits, Flowers, Animals, Buildings, so as that they all appear
Natural and Pleasing to the Eye. And he must not think as some do, that the force of Colouring consists in imploying of fine Colours, as fine lacks Ultra Marine Greens, &c. For these indeed, are fine before they are wrought, but the Painter’s Skill is to work them judiciously, and with convenience to his Subject.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

1 quotations

Quotation

Every Action must be represented as done, not only as ‘tis possible it might be perform’d, but in the Best manner. In the Print after Rafaëlle, grav’d by Marc Antonio, you see Hercules gripe Anteus with all the Advantage one can wish to have over an Adversary : […]. Daniele da Volterra has not succeeded so well in his famous Picture of the Descent from the Cross, where one of the Assistants, who stands upon a Ladder drawing out a Nail, is so disposed as is not very Natural, and Convenient for the purpose.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

3 quotations

Quotation

La plus grande perfection dans la Peinture, luy repartis-je, c'est de faire que toutes les qualitez du corps conviennent à la personne qu'on veut representer, soit dans la force des membres, soit dans la couleur de la chair. Par exemple, une belle femme, ou un jeune homme de condition, doivent avoir le corps blanc, délicat, & gratieux, comme dans le Tableau de Corege, dont je vous ay déja parlé, où il y a un Saint Jean tout nud, qui s'enfuit du Jardin des Olives, & dans celuy du Titien, qui est à l'Hostel de Sourdis, où Venus retient Adonis.


Quotation

[...] le Peintre devoit tellement assujettir toutes les parties qui entrent en la composition de son Tableau, qu'elles concourrent ensemble à former une juste idée du sujet, en sorte qu'elles puissent inspirer dans l'esprit des regardans des émotions convenables à cette idée, & que si il se rencontroit dans la narration de l'Histoire même, quelque circonstance qui y fut contraire, on la devoit supprimer ou si fort negliger quelle n'y pût faire aucune interruption, qu'on peut neanmoins prendre une discrette liberté de choisir des incidens favorables, ou quelque allegorie qui convienne au sujet pour la varieté du Contraste, mais que l'on doit éviter de faire paroître ensemble des choses incompatibles ; [...] le devoir du Peintre est de s'étudier soigneusement à rechercher tout ce qui est essentiel au sujet, & bien examiner ce que les bons Autheurs en ont écrit, & ce qui peu mieux faire paroître le Heros, afin d'en bien exprimer l'image & l'idée, & par ce moyen éviter le défaut que l'on voyoit en beaucoup de Tableaux, méprisés à cet égard, quoi que d'ailleurs très-beaux, comme par exemple en un Tableau du Bassant, où est representé le retour de l'Enfant prodigue en la maison de son Pere, dont les figures principales du sujet sont fort petites, éloignées dans le derriere du Tableau, [...]. En un autre du Breugle en la representation de l'une des plus importantes actions de la Magdeleine, où sont reculées dans le lointain les figures principales pour faire paroître sur le devant du Tableau diverses personnes indifferentes au sujet, [...] Que l'on void même en des representations de la Nativité de Nôtre Sauveur, où l'on met en des places les plus apparentes, un Boeuf & un Ane, qui sont des choses indecentes & profanes, [...] qu'ainsi la representation de ces animaux n'étoit nullement de l'essence du sujet & qu'ils ne conviennent point à l'idée que cette histoire doit inspirer dans l'esprit de ceux qui la contemplent.

De nombreuses autres œuvres picturales sont citées par Testelin dans ce passage, sans qu’il en précise les auteurs. Nous renvoyons donc directement au texte et à l’édition du texte par Christian Michel et Jacqueline Lichtenstein dans les Conférences de l'Académie royale de Peinture et de Sculpture. Tome 1, Les Conférences au temps d'Henry Testelin 1648-1681, vol. 2.



Other conceptual field(s)

Quotation

C'est pourquoi Mr. le Poussain qui sçavoit bien choisir les circonstances, & les approprier aux sujets qu'il traitoit, s'en faisoit une regle, disant ordinairement qu'il donnoit à ses Tableaux un mode Frigien ; pour dire qu'il suivoit la seule idée du sujet principal, c'est ce qui se remarque aussi en tous ses Ouvrages, notamment en celui dont on venoit de parler [ndr : Eliézer et Rebecca] [...] ; voilà l'idée du sujet qu'il s'est proposé en cette action, à quoi il a tellement assujetti toutes les parties qui entrent en la composition de cet excellent Ouvrage, qu'il n'y a rien mis qui ne convienne à un sujet Nuptial, tout y est gay, riant, plaisant, & agreable, ayant affecté de ne mêler point en cette compagnie de vieilles femmes, mais seulement de jeunes filles ajustées très proprement & de parfaitement bonne grace, dont les Draperies forment des plis delicats, les couleurs belles, les proportions sweltes, qu'on pouvoit dire qu'il avoit disposé ce Tableau dans le mode Corinthien, comme il disoit souvent, faisant allusion à la pratique des Architectes, lesquels en construisants quelque edifice font dependre de l'ordre qu'ils auront choisi toutes les parties jusqu'au moindre ornement. [...] On peut encore remarquer l'observation de cette maxime de Mr. le Poussain dans un Tableau du Miracle de Nôtre-Seigneur, en guerissant deux aveugles [ndr : Les Aveugles de Jéricho ou Le Christ guérissant les aveugles], où tout ce qui accompagne cette expression est grand, majestueux, & serieux, tant dans les actions que dans les habillemens des figures, les couleurs & la disposition du Paysage ; [...] mais pour ne rien obmettre de ce qui étoit essentiel au sujet, il avoit exprimé dans le petit nombre de figures qui accompagnent Nôtre-Seigneur tous les mouvemens & les passions qui pouvoient convenir en cette rencontre, l'incredulité & l'indifference des Juifs, la curiosité, la derision, & la mocquerie des Pharisiens, la foi, l'admiration & le zele des Disciples, le respect, la devotion & le grand desir des affligés.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

1 quotations

Quotation

Qu'appellez - vous correction du dessin, reprit Philarque, des contours bien proprement tirez, & un peu plus durs que le marbre mesme d'aprés quoy ils ont esté copiez ? J'appelle un dessin correct, repartit Caliste, celuy qui a précisément toutes ses justes proportions. Ce n'est pas peu, dit Philarque, quand il est affermi par une longue & belle pratique; permettez-moy neantmoins de vous dire que c'est un effet de la regle & du compas, c'est une démonstration & par consequent une chose où tout le monde peut arriver. Mais ce que j'appelle plus volontiers correction, & dont peu de Peintres ont esté capables, c'est d'imprimer aux objets la verité de la Nature, & d'y rappeller les idées de ceux que nous avons souvent devant les yeux, avec choix, convenance, & variété : choix pour ne pas prendre indifféremment tout ce qui se rencontre ; convenance, pour l'expression des sujets qui demandent des figures tantost d'une façon, & tantost d'une autre; & variété pour le plaisir des yeux, & pour la parfaite imitation de la Nature qui ne montre jamais deux objets semblables.



Other conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

3 quotations

Quotation

Il [ndr : Raphael] a toûjours conservé de la force & de la douceur dans tout ce qu'il a representé, il a sceu traiter ces sujets avec toute la convenance necessaire, soit en representant les coûtumes differentes des nations, soit dans les habits, dans les armes, dans les ornemens, dans le choix des lieux, & enfin dans tout de qui regarde cette partie de bien-seance, que Castelvetro nomme dans sa Poëtique il costume, & qui doit estre commune aux grands Poëtes & aux sçavans Peintres.

bienséance · convenance



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → ornement

Quotation

Il est deux sortes de vrai-semblance en Peinture, la vrai-semblance poëtique & la vrai-semblance mécanique. La vrai-semblance mécanique consiste à ne rien représenter qui ne soit possible, suivant les loix de la statique, les loix du mouvement, & les loix de l'optique.
Cette vrai-semblance mécanique consiste donc à ne point donner à une lumiere d'autres effets que ceux qu'elle auroit dans la nature : par exemple à ne lui point faire éclairer les corps sur lesquels d'autres corps interposez l'empêchent de tomber. Elle consiste à ne point s'éloigner sensiblement de la proportion naturelle des corps ; à ne point leur donner plus de force qu'il est vrai-semblable qu'ils en puissent avoir. Un Peintre pécheroit contre ces loix, s'il faisoit lever par un homme qui seroit mis dans une attitude, laquelle ne lui laisseroit que la moitié de ses forces, un fardeau qu'un homme, qui peut faire usage de toutes ses forces, auroit peine à ébranler. [...] Je ne parlerai point plus au long de la vrai-semblance mécanique, parce qu'on en trouve des regles très-detaillées dans les livres qui traitent de l'Art de la Peinture.
La vrai-semblance poëtique consiste à donner à ses personnages les passions qui leur conviennent suivant leur âge, leur dignité, suivant le temperament qu'on leur prête, & l'interêt qu'on leur fait prendre dans l'action. Elle consiste à observer dans son tableau ce que les italiens appellent il
Costumé ; c'est-à-dire à s'y conformer à ce que nous sçavons des mœurs, des habits, des bâtimens & des armes particulieres des peuples qu'on veut représenter. La vrai-semblance poëtique consiste enfin à donner aux personnages d'un tableau leur tête & leur caractere connu, quand ils en ont un, soit que ce caractere ait été pris sur des portraits, soit qu'il ait été imaginé.
 



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions

Quotation

La vrai-semblance poëtique consiste encore dans l'observation des regles que nous comprenons, ainsi que les Italiens, sous le mot de Costumé : observation qui donne un si grand mérite aux tableaux du Poussin. Suivant ces regles, il faut représenter les lieux où l'action s'est passée tels qu'ils ont été si nous en avons connoissance, & quand il n'en est pas demeuré de notion précise, il faut, en imaginant leur disposition, prendre garde à ne se point trouver en contradiction avec ce qu'on en peut sçavoir. Les mêmes regles veulent encore qu'on donne aux differentes Nations qui paroissent ordinairement sur la scene des tableaux, la couleur de visage & l'habitude de corps que l'histoire a remarqué leur être propres. Il est même beau de pousser la vrai-semblance jusques à suivre ce que nous sçavons de particulier des animaux de chaque païs, quand nous représentons un évenement arrivé dans ce païs-là. Le Poussin qui a traité plusieurs actions, dont la scene est en Egypte, met presque toujours dans ses tableaux des bâtimens, des arbres ou des animaux, qui par differentes raisons, sont regardez comme étant particuliers à ce païs.


12 quotations

Quotation

Et comme ce mot n’est pas un Terme particulierement affecté à la Peinture, mais qu’il est aussi commun aux Poëtes et aux Historiens, qui disent les mesmes choses que les Peintres ont accoustumé de representer ; je ne dois pas imputer seulement aux Peintres de nostre Nation, tout le reproche de n‘avoir pas encore donné de nom à cette excellente Partie de l’Art ; d’où il semble qu’on peut inférer qu’elle n’est donc pas conneüe ny pratiquée par eux. Il sera toûjours plus apropos et plus utile d’en expliquer le mystère, et de faire concevoir la force et la vraye intelligence de ce Costûme, qui est proprement à dire un Stile sçavant, une expression judicieuse, une Convenance particulière et spécifique à chaque figure du Sujet qu’on traitte : de sorte que ce mot bien entendu comprend, et veut dire tant de choses essentielles à nostre propos qu’il ne peut estre trop examiné ny trop expliqué.

costume


Quotation

Il faut donc qu’un Peintre qui aspire à quelque degré de gloire en sa Profession, soit fort exact à ce qui regarde le Costûme, et qu’il en fasse pour ainsi dire son capital, parce qu’il est généralement commun à nos cinq principes fondamentaux, et qu’il en compose l’Eurythmie de telle sorte, qu’on doit le considérer comme le Tout de ces cinq parties. Mais il se faut bien garder de croire que pour satisfaire à l’Intention du Costûme, ce soit assez d’eviter ces inepties, et ces lourdes fautes […] si outre cela on ne paroist ingénieux et sçavant dans l’Expression du Sujet qu’on traitte.


Quotation

Or je n’appelle estudié que ce qui concerne les opérations d’esprit, et les judicieuses Observations sur la Partie du Costume, lequel est comme un lien ou comme un Composé de l’Invention et de l’Expression, les deux plus nobles de nos cinq parties, où consiste tout ce qu’il y a d’ingénieux et de sublime dans la Peinture ; les trois autres, c’est-à-dire, la Proportion, le Coloris, et la Delineation perspective, regardant plustost le mechanique de l’Art, que le Spirituel, et n’estant, par manière de dire que les Instruments de la Science de la Peinture : si bien que ceux qui appliquent tout leur esprit à ces Parties-là, travaillent plustost en gens de mestier, qu’ils n’estudient ; Aussi ne sont-ils nommez par les Sçavants, que des Desseignateurs praticiens, et n’auroient jamais esté considérables parmi les Peintres anciens.


Quotation

[…] pour venir à cette tres-delicate Critique avec la circonspection requise, suivant toûjours la Boussole de nos Principes il faudra se souvenir, avant toutes choses, de quelle importance nous y avons establi l’Observation du Costûme, dans lequel consiste le Principal Magistère de la Peinture, et qui en est, pour ainsi dire, l’esprit Raisonnable ; comme le reste du mechanique, le Coloris, et la Delineation des figures, en fait simplement le Corps avec ses Organes.


Quotation

221. [Que l’on considere les Lieux où l’on met la Scene du Tableau, &c.] C’est ce que Monsieur de Chambray appelle, Faire les choses selon le Costûme. Voyez ce qu’il en dit dans l’explication de ce mot dans le Livre qu’il a fait de la Perfection de la Peinture. Ce n’est pas assez que dans le Tableau il ne se trouve rien de contraire au Lieu où l’Action que l’on represente s’est passée : il faut encore le faire reconnoistre par quelque industrie, & que l’esprit du Spectateur ne travaille pas à découvrir […]


Quotation

[...] mon Maistre me fist remarquer bien d’autres beautés que celles que les Cabalistes admirent dans les ouvrages de leurs Chefs : Car outre qu’il n’y manquoit rien de celles-là qui ne regardent que la pratique de l’Art, il m’y fist découvrir tant de science & d’étude, qu’il est presque aussi difficile de les exprimer, que de les imiter, à moins que d’avoir les mêmes connoissances desquelles ces rares Esprits se servoient, pour faire de si excellens Ouvrages.
            Il ne me parla point de la
Vaguesse du Coloris, de la Morbidesse des Carnations, de la Franchise du Pinceau, ny des autres termes extravagans à la mode de nos Cabalistes ; mais bien de la beauté, diversité, netteté & sublimité des pensées, de cette manière noble & majestueuse de traiter un sujet, de la discretion à le remplir dignement & convenablement à la verité de l’Histoire qu’il represente, & au Mode dans lequel il se rencontre ; de l’exacte & sçavante observation du Costume, dans laquelle ces anciens Maistres faisoient consister tout ce que la Peinture a d’ingenieux & de sublime ; de cette pointe d’esprit & de cet excellent genie, qu’ils faisoient paroistre dans leurs Ouvrages, dont les Ecrivains les ont loüés si hautement : De là suivoit la judicieuse & convenable disposition des lieux & des figures, la force & la diversité des expressions, l’élégance & le beau choix des attitudes, la diligence & l’exactitudes dans le dessein, la beauté & la variété des proportions, la position aisée & naturelle des figures sur leur centre de gravité ou équilibre, & conformément aux regles de la Perspective des Plans, qui est le lien & le soûtien de toutes les beautés de la Peinture, & sans laquelle elle n’est qu’une pure barboüillerie de Couleurs ; mais sur tout, cet agrément & cette grace admirable dans les mouvemens, qui est un talent autant rare qu’il est precieux.
            On pouvoit encore admirer la lumiere bien choisie, & répanduë avec discretion sur les objets, selon leur proximité ou éloignement de l’œil, & les accidens du lumineux, du Diaphane & du corps éclairé ; les differens effets des lumieres primitives & derivatives, l’amitié & la charmante harmonie (pour ainsi dire) des Couleurs, par leur degrés proportionnés de force ou d’afoiblissement, suivant les regles de la Perspective aërienne, ou par leur sympatie naturelle : Enfin, cette Eurithmie dans toutes les parties de l’Ouvrage, auquel elle donne son prix & sa valeur.
            Voilà une partie des veritables & solides beautés, que mon Maistre me fist observer dans les admirables Ouvrages de ces grands Hommes, qui ont charmé toute l’Antiquité, & dont le seul recit charme encor tous ceux qui l’entendent.


Quotation

CHOSES
Qui ne s’apprennent point, & qui sont parties essentielles à la Peinture.
PREMIEREMENT pour ce qui est de la matiere, elle doit estre noble, qui n’ait receü aucune qualité de l’ouvrier. Et pour donner lieu au Peintre de montrer son esprit & son industrie, il faut la prendre capable de recevoir la plus excellente forme. Il faut commencer par la disposition, puis par l’ornement, le décore, la beauté, la grace, la vivacité, le costume, la vraysemblance, & le jugement par tout. Ces dernieres parties sont du Peintre, & ne se peuvent enseigner. C’est le rameau d’or de Virgile, que nul ne peut trouver ni cueïllir, s’il n’est conduit par le Destin. Ces neuf parties contiennent plusieurs choses dignes d’estre écrites par de bonnes & sçavantes mains.

Extrait d’une lettre de Poussin à Fréart de Chambray du 7 mars 1665.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

Dans les deux Tableaux du frapement de roche combien de differentes actions noblement representées! On peut encore dans ces mesmes tableaux remarquer ce qu’il dit du costume, c’est à dire, ce qui regarde la convenance dans toutes les choses qui doivent accompagner une histoire.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

But these Liberties [ndr : prises envers la vérité historique et naturelle] must be taken with great Caution and Judgment ; for in the main, Historical, and Natural Truth must be observed, the Story may be embellish’d, or something of it par’d away, but still So as it may be immediately known ; nor must any thing be contrary to Nature but upon great Necessity, and apparent Reason. History must not be corrupted, and turn’d into Fable or Romance : Every Person, and Thing must be made to sustain its proper Character ; and not only the Story, but the Circumstances must be observ’d, the Scene of Action, the Countrey, or Place, the Habits, Arms, Manners, Proportions, and the like, must correspond. This is call’d the observing the Costûme.


Quotation

Le (d) costume est encore une chose que l’habile peintre ne néglige jamais dans son tableau ; c’est l’exacte observation des mœurs, des caractères, des modes, des usages, des habits, des armes, des bâtimens, des plantes & des animaux du pays dans lequel s’est passée l’action qu’il veut représenter.
(d) On dit en François costume & non pas costumé, qui est le mot Italien
il costume ; les bons auteurs & notamment l’Abbé Fleury s’est servi du mot de costume dans les mœurs des Israëlites. Pag. 106.


Quotation

COSTUMÉ, ce mot est tout Italien ; il signifie proprement usage, coutume. 
On l’entend ; 1°. de tout ce qui concerne les usages, les mœurs, les habillemens, les armes, la physionomie, & la façon de vivre de chaque peuple : ainsi c’est pécher contre le
costumé, que d’habiller ou d’armer des grecs, comme des Perses, des Romains, comme des François, de représenter César avec un chapeau, des gans une perruque ; 2°. on entend par Costumé, tout ce qui regarde la chronologie, l’ordre des temps, & la vérité de certains faits connus de tout le monde. 
Raphaël a péché contre le
costumé, lorsqu’il a représenté les modestes Archidiacres de l’Eglise Romaine du temps de S. Leon, avec tout l’éclat & tout le faste que la Cour de Rome avoit du temps de Leon X. 
Paul Veronese a péché contre le
costumé en plaçant des Bénédictins au festin de Cana ; 3°. on entend par costumé tout ce qui concerne les bienséances, le caractére & les convenances propres de chaque âge & de chaque condition : ainsi c’est pécher contre le costumé que de mettre la tête d’un jeune homme sur le corps d’un vieillard, ou une main blanche sur un corps halé, d’habiller un Hercule d’une étoffé légére, & un Apollon d’une grosse étoffe. 
4°. Enfin l’on entend par
costumé tout ce qui regarde la nature, la qualité & la propriété esentielle des élémens, des corps & de toutes les choses naturelles.
Ne pas observer toutes ces choses, c’est pécher contre le
costumé. Telle est la véritable signification du mot costumé, que les Auteurs du Dictionnaire de Trévoux ont bien mal entendu. Il seroit difficile de le définir plus mal qu’ils n’ont fait. Voici cet article tel que je l’ai trouvé dans l’Edition en 5 volumes de l’année 1721. 
« Costume, terme de Peinture. Delineatio. Les grands Peintres Lombards se sont plus attachés à ce qui regarde la couleur, qu’à ce qui regarde le dessein, & à ce qu’on appelle costumé. »
Felibien
Il seroit inutile de relever l’erreur visible de ces lexicographes, qui ont confondu le
costumé avec le dessein, Delineatio, comme si c’étoient des mots synonimes. Je remarquerai seulement que ce qui a occasionné cette erreur, c’est la passage même de Felibien qu’ils ont cité, & qu’il n’ont pas compris. Ils ont cru que ces derniéres paroles à ce qui est du dessein, & à ce qu’on appelle costumé, renfermoient précisément la même idée, & que par le mot de dessein & de costumé, Félibien n’entendoit qu’une même chose.


1 quotations

Quotation

Pour bien me faire entendre, il faut que je distingue trois choses dans la peinture. La representation des figures, l'expression des passions, & la composition du tout ensemble. Dans la representation des figures je comprens non seulement la juste delineation de leurs contours, mais aussi l'application des vraies couleurs qui leur conviennent. Par l'expression des passions, j'entens les differens caracteres des visages & les diverses attitudes des figures qui marquent ce qu'elles veulent faire, ce qu'elles pensent, en un mot ce qui se passe dans le fond de leur ame. Par la composition du tout ensemble j'entens l'assemblage judicieux de toutes ces figures, placées avec entente, & dégradées de couleur selon l'endroit du plan où elles sont posées. 
Ce que je dis icy d'un tableau où il y a plusieurs figures, se doit entendre aussi d'un tableau où il n'y en a qu'une, parce que les différentes parties de cette figure sont entr'elles ce que plusieurs figures sont les unes à l'égard des autres. Comme ceux qui apprennent à peindre commencent par apprendre à designer le contour des figures, & à le remplir de leurs couleurs naturelles ; qu'ensuite ils s'étudient à donner de belles attitudes à leurs figures & à bien exprimer les passions dont ils veulent qu'elles, paroissent animées, mais que ce n'est qu'après un long-temps qu'ils sçavent ce qu'on doit observer pour bien disposer la composition d'un tableau, pour bien distribuer le clair obscur, & pour bien mettre toutes choses dans les regles de la perspective ; tant pour le trait que pour l’affoiblissement des ombres & des lumieres. 
De mesme ceux qui les premiers dans le monde ont commencé à peindre, ne se sont appliquez d'abord qu'à representer naïvement le trait & la couleur des objets, sans desirer autre chose, sinon que ceux qui verroient leurs Ouvrages peussent dire, voila un Homme , voila un Cheval, voila un Arbre, […]. Ensuite ils ont passé à donner de belles attitudes à leurs figures, & à les animer vivement de toutes les passions imaginables : Et voila les deux seules parties de la peinture, où nous sommes obligez de croire que soient parvenus les Appelles & les Zeuxis, si nous en jugeons par la vray-semblance du progrez que leur Art a pû faire, & parce que les Auteurs nous rapportent de leurs Ouvrages ; sans qu'ils ayent jamais connu, si ce n'est tres-imparfaitement, cette troisiéme partie de la peinture qui regarde la composition d'un tableau, suivant les regles & les égards que je viens d'expliquer.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

Quotation

Ce que je dis icy d'un tableau où il y a plusieurs figures, se doit entendre aussi d'un tableau où il n'y en a qu'une, parce que les différentes parties de cette figure sont entr'elles ce que plusieurs figures sont les unes à l'égard des autres. Comme ceux qui apprennent à peindre commencent par apprendre à designer le contour des figures, & à le remplir de leurs couleurs naturelles ; qu'ensuite ils s'étudient à donner de belles attitudes à leurs figures & à bien exprimer les passions dont ils veulent qu'elles, paroissent animées, mais que ce n'est qu'après un long-temps qu'ils sçavent ce qu'on doit observer pour bien disposer la composition d'un tableau, pour bien distribuer le clair obscur, & pour bien mettre toutes choses dans les regles de la perspective ; tant pour le trait que pour l’affoiblissement des ombres & des lumieres. 
De mesme ceux qui les premiers dans le monde ont commencé à peindre, ne se sont appliquez d'abord qu'à representer naïvement le trait & la couleur des objets, sans desirer autre chose, sinon que ceux qui verroient leurs Ouvrages peussent dire, voila un Homme , voila un Cheval, voila un Arbre, […]. Ensuite ils ont passé à donner de belles attitudes à leurs figures, & à les animer vivement de toutes les passions imaginables : Et voila les deux seules parties de la peinture, où nous sommes obligez de croire que soient parvenus les Appelles & les Zeuxis, si nous en jugeons par la vray-semblance du progrez que leur Art a pû faire, & parce que les Auteurs nous rapportent de leurs Ouvrages ; sans qu'ils ayent jamais connu, si ce n'est tres-imparfaitement, cette troisiéme partie de la peinture qui regarde la composition d'un tableau, suivant les regles & les égards que je viens d'expliquer.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

1 quotations

Quotation

La peinture est composée de tant de parties, que nous ne devons presque jamais nous flatter de ne pas perdre de vûë les unes, en nous attachant à chercher les autres. Il n’est pas moins rare de trouver des amis qui soient également touchez de toutes ces parties. L’un n’est sensible qu’à la couleur, & n’est que peu flatté de l’élégance du dessein ; l’autre au contraire prétend que sans le grand goût, la délicatesse & la pureté du dessein, la Peinture n’est autre qu’une affaire mécanique. L’Homme d’esprit & de sentiment ne s’attachera qu’à l’expression des têtes, & à l’ordonnance. L’homme d’érudition sera satisfait si la coutume est scrupuleusement observé dans un tableau : ainsi des autres.



Other conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la peinture

1 quotations

Quotation

But these Liberties [ndr : prises envers la vérité historique et naturelle] must be taken with great Caution and Judgment ; for in the main, Historical, and Natural Truth must be observed, the Story may be embellish’d, or something of it par’d away, but still So as it may be immediately known ; nor must any thing be contrary to Nature but upon great Necessity, and apparent Reason. History must not be corrupted, and turn’d into Fable or Romance : Every Person, and Thing must be made to sustain its proper Character ; and not only the Story, but the Circumstances must be observ’d, the Scene of Action, the Countrey, or Place, the Habits, Arms, Manners, Proportions, and the like, must correspond. This is call’d the observing the Costûme.


1 quotations

Quotation

Het welschicken van dagen en schaduwen by een, is een van de principaelste hooft-banden daer een goet Schilder mede verciert dient te zijn, om de wel-standigheyt die de selve onse Konst aen brenght: want de schaduwe by een ghevoeght zijnde op haer behoorlijcke plaets, gheven sulcken tooverachtighe kracht, en wonderbaerlijcke welstandt; dat veel dinghen, die nauwelijcx door gheen Penceelen met verwen zijn na te bootsen, seer eyghentlijck doen schijnen.

[proposition de traduction, Léonard Pouy:] Le bon arrangement des jours et des ombres est l’une des principales couronnes dont doit se parer un bon peintre, car il apporte à notre art sa bienséance. Car lorsque les ombres sont arrangées à leurs propres places les unes à côté des autres, elles possèdent un pouvoir tellement enchanteur et une convenance si merveilleuse, qu’elles font apparaître comme tout à fait vraies certaines choses qu’il est difficile d’imiter avec un pinceau et des couleurs.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → lumière
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la lumière
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → merveilleux et sublime
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition

6 quotations

Quotation

{5. Of Drapery.} The fifth [ndr : erreur fréquemment commise par le peintre] is of Drapery or attire, in not observing a decorum in garments proper to every severall condition and calling, as not giving to a King his Robes of estate, with their proper furres and linings : to religious persons an habite fitting with humility and contempt of the world ; a notable example of this kind I found in a Gentlemans hall, which was King Salomon sitting in his throne with a deepe lac’d Gentlewomans Ruffe, and a Rebatoe about his necke, upon his head a blacke Velvet cap with a white feather ; the Queene of Sheba kneeling before him in a loose bodied gowne, and a Frenchhood. […].


Quotation

I am of opinion that Francis Mazzalinus would have proved the only rare Man of the World, if he had never Painted any other kind of Pictures (as rude, gross, and melancholly) then these slender ones which he representeth with an admirable dexterity as being naturally inclined thereunto ; so that if he had only represented Apollo, Bacchus, the Nimphes, &c. he had sufficiently warranted this his most acceptable proportion, which was ever slender, and oftentimes to sleight, but when he took upon him to express the Prophets, our Lady and the like in the same ; as appeareth by his Moses at Parma, our Lady at Ancona, and certain Angells not farr from thence, and divers other things quite contrary to the Symetry they ought to have, he gave a president to all other Painters to shunne the like error : which himself might also have easily avoided, being reputed little inferiour to Raphael Urbine, whom he might have proposed to himself as a patterne ; for Raphael ever suited his personages answerable to the variety of the Natures, and Dispositions of the Parties he imitated : so that his Old Folks seem stiff and crooked, his Young Men agile and slender and so forth in the rest, which example admonisheth us, that a Painter ought not to tye himself to any one kind of proportion, in all his Figures ; for besides that he shall lose the true Decorum of the History : He shall commit a great absurdity in the Art by making all his Pictures like Twinns : […]. And for our better understanding of this kind of proportion […] Raph: Urbine hath very well expressed it in St. George fighting with the Dragon, now to be seen in the Churches of St. Victore de Fratri in Milane ; in St. Michaell at Fontainblew in France, and in that George, which he made for the Duke of Urbine on a Peice richly guilt, according to which Observation of his, every Man may dispose of this proportion in the like young Bodies, […].

Browne cite ici une Madonne du Parmesan, semble-t-il conservée à Ancône, qui n'a pu être identifiée précisément.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion

Quotation

[…] sleep causeth no motions of vigor or force to be represented, but as if the body were without life ; Wherefore we must take heed, we doe not (as some use) give unto those which sleep such kinds of actions in their lying, as in probability will not suffer them to sleep, as we see oftentimes in Men lying athwart stones, benches, &c. being represented with their limns supported by their own force, wherein it is evident, that such Painters know not how to observe a Decorum.


Quotation

Traveller.
           
After the Death of Raphael and his Schollars (for, as for Michael Angelo he made no School) Painting seemed to be Decaying ; and for some Years, there was hardly a Master of any Repute all over Italy. The two best at Rome were Joseph Arpino and Michael Angelo da Caravaggio, but both guilty of great Mistakes in their Art : the first followed purely his Fancy, or rather Humour, which was neither founded upon Nature nor Art, but had for Ground a certain Practical, Fantastical Idea which he had framed to himself. The other was a pure Naturalist, Copying Nature without distinction or discretion ; he understood little of Composition or Decorum, but was an admirable Colourer.



Other conceptual field(s)

Quotation

Traveller.
            Invention
is the Manner of Expressing that Fable and Story which the Painter has chosen for the Subject of his Piece ; and may principally be divided into Order and Decorum. [...] The second part of Invention is Decorum ; that is, that there be nothing Absurd nor Discordant in the Piece : and in this part, the Lombard Painters are very faulty ; taking Liberties that move one almost to Laughter ; Witness Titian himself, who Drew Saint Margaret a Stride upon the Dragon : and most of the Lombard Painters are subject to a certain Absurdity of Anachronisaie’s Drawing. For Example, our Saviour upon the Cross, and Saint Francis and Saint Benedict looking on, though they did not live till eight hundred Years after our Saviour’s Passion. All Indecencies are likewise to be avoided : and Michael Angelo doth justly deserve to be Censured, in his great Picture of the Day of Judgment, for having exposed to view in the Church it self, the secret parts of Men and Women, and made Figures among the Blessed that kiss one another most tenderly. Raphael on the contrary, was so great an Observer of Decorum, that though his Subject led him to any Liberties of that kind, he would find a way to keep to the Rules of Modesty ; and indeed, he seems to have been Inspired for the Heads of his Madonna’s and Saints, it being impossible to imagine more Noble Physionomies than he gives them ; and withal, an Air of Pudour and Sanctity that strikes the Spectator with Respect.


Quotation

Polydore, in a Drawing I have seen of him, has made an Ill Choice with respect to Decorum ; he has shewn Cato with his Bowels gushing out, which is not only Offensive in itself, but ‘tis a Situation in which Cato should not be seen, ‘tis Indecent ; such things should be left to Imagination, and not display’d on the Stage. But Michelangelo in his last Judgment has sinn’d against this Rule most egregiously.


3 quotations

Quotation

CHOSES
Qui ne s’apprennent point, & qui sont parties essentielles à la Peinture.
PREMIEREMENT pour ce qui est de la matiere, elle doit estre noble, qui n’ait receü aucune qualité de l’ouvrier. Et pour donner lieu au Peintre de montrer son esprit & son industrie, il faut la prendre capable de recevoir la plus excellente forme. Il faut commencer par la disposition, puis par l’ornement, le décore, la beauté, la grace, la vivacité, le costume, la vraysemblance, & le jugement par tout. Ces dernieres parties sont du Peintre, & ne se peuvent enseigner. C’est le rameau d’or de Virgile, que nul ne peut trouver ni cueïllir, s’il n’est conduit par le Destin. Ces neuf parties contiennent plusieurs choses dignes d’estre écrites par de bonnes & sçavantes mains.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

Quelle beauté, quel décore, quelle grace dans le Tableau de Rébecca ? L’on ne peut pas dire du Poussin ce qu’Apelle disoit à un de ses disciples, que n’ayant pû peindre Helene belle, il l’avoit representée riche {Clem. Alex.}. Car dans ce Tableau du Poussin la beauté éclate bien plus que tous les ornemens, qui sont simples & convenables au sujet. Il a parfaitement observé ce qu’il appelle décore ou bienseance, & sur tout la grace, cette qualité si précieuse & si rare dans les ouvrages de l’art aussi-bien que dans ceux de la nature.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

Ce que les Italiens apellent Costume & Decore, qui sont des termes dont on se sert en parlant de la convenance, ne consiste pas dans les sentimens de la morale, que la peinture ne peut directement exprimer. Mais dans les actions exterieures, qui ont du raport à la condition, & à la dignité des personnes, qu’on doit toujours reconnoître dans leurs manieres. […] Il paroît, ce Decore, dans la Peinture par plusieurs circonstances exterieures que le Peintre observe dans les figures, à l’égard des cheveux, des habits, de la couleur, de l’Atitude, du geste, & de l’expression : Choses qui dependent d’un grand savoir, & d’un profond jugement.

convenance



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’ARTISTE → qualités

1 quotations

Quotation

LE PRESIDENT. C'est un usage si receu de mettre dans des tableaux de pieté ceux qui les font faire, & d’y mettre aussi toute leur famille, que cet assemblage de personnes de differens temps & de differens lieux, ne devroit pas vous étonner.
L'ABBE. Je connois cet usage & je ne le blâme point, quoyque les Peintres n’ayent pas sujet d'en estre fort contens. On voit tous les jours dans des Nativitez, ceux qui ont fait le tableau, mais à genoux & dans l'adoration comme les Bergers. On en voit aussi dans des tableaux de Crucifix, mais prosternez & les yeux levez vers le Sauveur, en sorte que leur action particuliere est liée à l’action principale, & concourt à la mesme fin. Icy les personnages ne semblent pas se voir les uns les autres, & il n'y a que la seule volonté du Peintre qui les ayt fait trouver dans le mesme lieu.
LE PRESIDENT. Tous ces pretendus défauts ne regardent point le Peintre comme Peintre, mais feulement comme Historien.
L’ABBE.
Cela est vray, si vous renfermez la qualité de Peintre à représenter naïvement quelque objet, sans se mettre en peine s'il y a de la vray-semblance, de la bien-seance & du bon sens dans la composition ; mais je ne croy pas que les Peintres vueillent renoncer à l'obligation d'observer des conditions justes & si necessaires dans tout un ouvrage.



Other conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → jugement
GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire

2 quotations

Quotation

Qu'appellez - vous correction du dessin, reprit Philarque, des contours bien proprement tirez, & un peu plus durs que le marbre mesme d'aprés quoy ils ont esté copiez ? J'appelle un dessin correct, repartit Caliste, celuy qui a précisément toutes ses justes proportions. Ce n'est pas peu, dit Philarque, quand il est affermi par une longue & belle pratique; permettez-moy neantmoins de vous dire que c'est un effet de la regle & du compas, c'est une démonstration & par consequent une chose où tout le monde peut arriver. Mais ce que j'appelle plus volontiers correction, & dont peu de Peintres ont esté capables, c'est d'imprimer aux objets la verité de la Nature, & d'y rappeller les idées de ceux que nous avons souvent devant les yeux, avec choix, convenance, & variété : choix pour ne pas prendre indifféremment tout ce qui se rencontre ; convenance, pour l'expression des sujets qui demandent des figures tantost d'une façon, & tantost d'une autre; & variété pour le plaisir des yeux, & pour la parfaite imitation de la Nature qui ne montre jamais deux objets semblables.



Other conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

Are. Il paroit par ce qui a eté dit jusqu’ici, que l’invention vient de deux sources, de l’histoire, & de l’esprit du peintre. L’histoire lui fournit simplement la matiere ; mais l’esprit, outre l’ordre & la convenance, produit les attitudes, les diversités, & pour ainsi dire, l’expression des figures ; ce qui est une partie qui lui est commune avec le dessein. Il suffit de dire, que le peintre ne doit point etre negligent en aucune des parties de l’invention, & qu’il ne choisisse qu’un nombre convenable de figures ; considerant qu’il les presente aux yeux des spectateurs, qui embarassés par la trop grande quantité se degoutent ; d’autant plus qu’il n’est pas vraisemblable, qu’en un seul, & meme tems, on leur represente tant de choses.



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire
L’ARTISTE → qualités
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → génie, esprit, imagination
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

2 quotations

Quotation

The Goût is a mixture of Poussin’s usual Manner [ndr : il s’agit ici du Tancrède et Herminie, réalisé par Poussin], and (what is very rare) a great deal of Guilio, particulary in the Head, and Attitude of the Lady, and both the Horses ; Tancred is naked to the Wast having been stripp’d by Erminia and his ’Squire to search for his Wounds, he has a piece of loose Drapery which is Yellow, bearing upon the Red in the Middle Tincts, and Shadows, this is thrown over his Belly, and Thighs, and lyes a good length upon the ground ; ’twas doubtless painted by the Life, and is intirely of a Modern Taste. And that nothing might be shocking, or disagreeable, the wounds are much hid, nor is his Body, or Garment stain’d with Blood, only some appears here, and there upon the ground just below the Drapery, as if it flow’d from some Wounds which That cover’d ;


Quotation

A Painter is allow’d sometimes to depart even from Natural, and Historical Truth.
Thus in the Carton of the Draught of Fishes
Rafaëlle has made a Boat too little to hold the Figures he has plac’d in it ; and this is so visible, that Some are apt to Triumph over that great Man, […] ; but the Truth is, had he made the Boat large enough for those Figures his Picture would have been all Boat, which would have had a Disagreeable Effect ; […].



Other conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition

1 quotations

Quotation

… de selvighe moet noch voorder met ons uyt d’oude schrijvers aenmercken dat de voornaemste deughd van een nette en welghestelde Inventie aller meest in dese vier dinghen bestaet. In de waerheyd. In d’Opertuniteyt, ofte in de waerneminghe van een bequaeme geleghenheyd van tijd en plaetse, in de discretie, ofte in de bescheydenheyd van een tuchtigh ende eerbaer beleyd. In de Magnificentie, ofte in de staetelickheyd. Wat de waerheydt belanght; De Schilder-konst maeckt altijd vele wercks van de waerheyd, seght Philostratus Iconum Lib. I. in Narcisso. Ende ghelijck dien Historie-schrijver soo wel met bedrogh schijnt om te gaen, seght Ammianus Marcellinus {Lib. XXIX.}, de welcke eenighe warachtighe gheschiedenissen wetens en willens voor by gaet, als die eenighe valsche gheschiedenissen verdicht; even alsoo plaght de maelkonste in het uytdrucken der waerheydt op dese twee dinghen goede achtinghe te nemen, sy wil aen de eene sijde daer toe niet verstaen dat se yet soude uytdrucken ’t ghene men in de nature niet en vindt, men kanse wederom aen d’andere sijde daer toe niet brenghen datse yet soude overslaen ’t ghene men in de nature vindt.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] …the same has to remark with us from the old writers that the main virtue of a neat and well-composed Inventie mainly consists of four things: In the truth. In the Opportunity, or in the observation of an appropriate situation of time and place, in the discretion, or the modesty of a disciplinary and honorable policy. In the Magnificence, or in the stateliness. For as far as the truth is concerned; The Art of painting always pays a lot of attention to the truth, says Philostratus Iconum Lib. I. in Narcisso. And like the History-writer manages to deal so well with deceit, says Ammianus Marcellinus {…}, that it appears to consciously pass by any truthful histories, when he poetizes some false histories; as such the art of painting tends to pay attention to these to things when expressing the truth, on the one hand she does not want it to happen that she would express that which one cannot find in nature, and on the other hand she cannot bring herself that she would neglect that which one finds in nature.

In the Latin edition (1637), most of the terms are given only in Greek. [MO]

bescheydenheyd



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → grandeur et noblesse

1 quotations

Quotation

Traveller.
           
I must then repeat to you what I told you at our first Meeting [ndr : Dialogue I, « Explaining the Art of Painting »] ; which is, That the Art of Painting has three Parts ; which are, Design, Colouring, and Invention ; and under this third, is that which we call Disposition ; which is properly the Order in which all the Parts of the Story are disposed, so as to produce one effect according to the Design of the Painter ; and that is the first Effect which a good Piece of History is to produce in the Spectator ; that is, if it be a Picture of a joyful Event, that all that is in it be Gay and Smiling, to the very Landskips, Houses, Heavens, Cloaths, &c. And that all the Aptitudes tend to Mirth. The same, if the Story be Sad, or Solemn ; and so for the rest. And a Piece that does not do this at first sight, is most certainly faulty though it never so well Designed, or never so well Coloured ; nay, though there be Learning and Invention in it ; for as a Play that is designed to make me Laugh, is most certainly an ill one if it makes me Cry. So an Historical Piece that doth not produce the Effect it is designed for, cannot pretend to an Excellency, though it be never so finely Painted.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → génie, esprit, imagination

1 quotations

Quotation

[…] le bon sens, & la qualité de la matiere doivent déterminer le Peintre à donner aux objets qu'il aura choisis les places qui leur conviennent pour remplir les devoirs d'une bonne composition.
[…] Car l'œconomie dépend de la qualité du sujet, qui est tantôt patetique & tantôt enjoué, tantôt heroïque & tantôt populaire, tantôt tendre & tantôt terrible, & enfin qui demande plus ou moins de mouvement, selon qu'il est plus ou moins vif ou tranquille. Mais si le sujet inspire au Peintre une bonne œconomie dans la distribution des objets, la bonne distribution de son côté sert merveilleusement à exprimer le sujet. Elle donne de la force & de la grace aux choses qui sont inventées ; elle tire les figures de la confusion, & fait que ce que l'on represente est plus net, plus sensible & plus capable d'appeller, & d'arrêter son Spectateur.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

2 quotations

Quotation

[...] mon Maistre me fist remarquer bien d’autres beautés que celles que les Cabalistes admirent dans les ouvrages de leurs Chefs : Car outre qu’il n’y manquoit rien de celles-là qui ne regardent que la pratique de l’Art, il m’y fist découvrir tant de science & d’étude, qu’il est presque aussi difficile de les exprimer, que de les imiter, à moins que d’avoir les mêmes connoissances desquelles ces rares Esprits se servoient, pour faire de si excellens Ouvrages.
            Il ne me parla point de la
Vaguesse du Coloris, de la Morbidesse des Carnations, de la Franchise du Pinceau, ny des autres termes extravagans à la mode de nos Cabalistes ; mais bien de la beauté, diversité, netteté & sublimité des pensées, de cette manière noble & majestueuse de traiter un sujet, de la discretion à le remplir dignement & convenablement à la verité de l’Histoire qu’il represente, & au Mode dans lequel il se rencontre ; de l’exacte & sçavante observation du Costume, dans laquelle ces anciens Maistres faisoient consister tout ce que la Peinture a d’ingenieux & de sublime ; de cette pointe d’esprit & de cet excellent genie, qu’ils faisoient paroistre dans leurs Ouvrages, dont les Ecrivains les ont loüés si hautement : De là suivoit la judicieuse & convenable disposition des lieux & des figures, la force & la diversité des expressions, l’élégance & le beau choix des attitudes, la diligence & l’exactitudes dans le dessein, la beauté & la variété des proportions, la position aisée & naturelle des figures sur leur centre de gravité ou équilibre, & conformément aux regles de la Perspective des Plans, qui est le lien & le soûtien de toutes les beautés de la Peinture, & sans laquelle elle n’est qu’une pure barboüillerie de Couleurs ; mais sur tout, cet agrément & cette grace admirable dans les mouvemens, qui est un talent autant rare qu’il est precieux.
            On pouvoit encore admirer la lumiere bien choisie, & répanduë avec discretion sur les objets, selon leur proximité ou éloignement de l’œil, & les accidens du lumineux, du Diaphane & du corps éclairé ; les differens effets des lumieres primitives & derivatives, l’amitié & la charmante harmonie (pour ainsi dire) des Couleurs, par leur degrés proportionnés de force ou d’afoiblissement, suivant les regles de la Perspective aërienne, ou par leur sympatie naturelle : Enfin, cette Eurithmie dans toutes les parties de l’Ouvrage, auquel elle donne son prix & sa valeur.
            Voilà une partie des veritables & solides beautés, que mon Maistre me fist observer dans les admirables Ouvrages de ces grands Hommes, qui ont charmé toute l’Antiquité, & dont le seul recit charme encor tous ceux qui l’entendent.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → merveilleux et sublime

Quotation

Ce n’est pas seulement par differentes qualités de figures qu’on allie diverses persones, sous differents aspects ; mais la meme persone le plus souvent se diversifie aussi. Car autrement on doit representer Cesar comme Consul, que comme Capitaine, ou Empereur. De meme en peignant Hercule, le peintre se le figurera d’une certaine maniere combattant avec Anthée, d’un’ autre maniere quand il porte la coeffe, dans un autre posture quand il caresse Dejanire, & diversement lorsqu’il va chercher son Hilas : cependant toutes ces actions & toutes ces attitudes doivent toujours conserver les convenances d’Hercule, & de Cesar. Il faut aussi prendre garde de bien s’accorder dans un meme corps ; c’est a dire de ne point faire une partie charnûe, & l’autre maigre, une pleine de muscles, & l’autre delicate, & gresle : Il est vrai pourtant que si la figure fait une action qui sente la fatigue, soit qu’elle porte un poids, ou remüe un bras, ou autre membre, dans la partie qui fatigue par le poids, ou par le mouvement, il faut que les muscles forcent bien plus, que dans celle qui repose, mais non pas d’une maniere qui paroisse choquante.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

4 quotations

Quotation

[…] je te dis que le drap doit suivre les contours :
Hormis qu’il fut si gros que par sa lourde masse
Le ply sans quelque effort ne bougeat de sa place ;
Car selon que le geste est faible ou violent
Et que le drap est gros, le ply vient prompt ou lent
Il faut rendre l’effet conforme à la matiere,
Et le faire grossier si l’estoffe est grossiere.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Quand à la maniere de drapper les figures tout ce qui en fut dit ce reduisit à deux ou trois observations ; l'une de suivre le Mode ou Costume, & à l'exemple des Auteurs des Antiques, Modeller les figures nuës soit de Terre ou de cire, & poser dessus les drapperies pour en étudier les plis suivant l'idée qu'on en aura projetté. Pour la maniere des Etoffes, soit Brocard ou Broderie, dont quelques Peintres Modernes ont affecté de revêtir des Anges pour exprimer leur differants degrez de charges & d'honneur dans le Ciel. L'Academie en a desaprouvé l'usage, & fit observer en second lieu la qualité des figures Allegoriques où l'on n'est point assujetti à aucune mode, qu'il suffit d'ajuster les draperies d'une maniere agreable pour cacher les parties deshonnêtes ou deplaisantes à la vuë, & conserver soigneusement ce qui marque la proportion, évitant de traverser l'étenduë par des petits plis enfonsés que l'on doit renger à l'endroit des jointures.

étoffe · brocard · broderie · costume



Other conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → règles et préceptes
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

{Les Draperies} Que les Draperies soient bien jettées, que les plis en soient grands, en petit nombre autant qu’il est possible, & bien contrastées ; que les étofes en soient épaisses, ou légeres selon la qualité & la convenance des figures ; qu'elles soient quelquefois ouvragées & d'espèce différente & quelquefois simple, suivant la convenance des sujets & des endroits du Tableau, qui demandent plus ou moins d’éclat pour l’ornement du Tableau & pour l'oeconomie du tout ensemble.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

Que les drapperies soient jettées noblement ; que les plis en soient amples, & qu’ils suivent l’ordre des parties, les faisant voir dessous par le moyen des lumiéres & des ombres, nonobstant que ces parties soient souvent traversées par le coulant des plis qui flottent à l’entour, sans y être trop adherans & colez, mais qui les marquent en les flattant par la dispensation juste des ombres & des clairs. La beauté des draperies ne consiste pas dans la quantité des plis, mais dans un ordre simple & naturel. Il faut observer la qualité des personnes ; aux Rois, Princes, Prelats & Magistrats, il faut leur en donner d’amples ; aux païsans & aux esclaves, de grosses & retroussées, & aux filles de tendres & de legeres.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

2 quotations

Quotation

Traveller,
            ’
Tis very true, tis one of the most difficult parts of Painting [ndr : le traitement de la draperie]; and the best Rule is, that your Drapery be in large Foldings, Noble and Simple, not repeated too often, but following the Order of the Parts ; and let them be of Stuffs and Silks that are commonly worn, of beautiful Colours, but sweet, and such as do not trench upon the Naked too harshly, and by that means they will be of great Use for the Union of the Whole ; either by reflecting the Light, or giving such a Fund as is wanting for the other Colours to appear better. They serve also to fill up any empty place in the Picture.
            There is also a Judicious Choice to be made of Draperies, according to the Quality of the Persons : Magistrates and Grave People must have Ample and Long Robes ; Countrey People and Souldiers must have Close, Short Draperies ; Young Maids and Women must have them Light, Thin, and Tender. They that follow the Drapery of the Antients in Statues, will always be Stiff, as Raphael was at first, because that they used little Foldings, often repeated ; which do best in Marble or Brass. But Painters who have the Command of Colours, Lights and Shadows, may extend their Draperies, and let them fly as they please. Titian, Paul Veronese, Tintoret, Rubens, and Vandike, have painted Drapery admirably ; and indeed the Lombard School have excell’d in that and Colouring, as the Roman and Florentine
in Design and Nudity.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

The Robes, and other Habits of the Figures ; their Attendants, and Ensigns of Authority, or Dignity, as Crowns, Maces, &c. help to express their Distinct Characters ; and commonly even their Place in the Composition. The Principal Persons, and Actors must not be put in a Corner, or towards the Extremities of the Picture, unless the Necessity of the Subject requires it. A Christ, or an Apostle must not be dress’d like an Artificer, or a Fisherman ; a Man of Quality must be distinguish’d from one of the Lower Orders of Men, as a Well-bred Man always is in Life from a Peasant. And so of the rest.
Every body knows the common, or ordinary Distinctions by Dress ; but there is one Instance of a particular kind which I will mention, as being likely to give useful Hints to this purpose, and moreover very curious. In the Carton of Giving the Keys to S.
Peter, Our Saviour is wrapt only in on large piece of white Drapery, his Left Arm, and Breast, are part of his Legs naked ; which undoubtedly was done to denote him Now to appear in his Resurrection-Body, and not as before his Crucifixion, when This Dress would have been altogether improper. And this is the more remarkable, as having been done upon second Thoughts, and after the Picture was perhaps finish’d, which I know by having a Drawing of this Carton, very old, and probably made in Rafaëlle’s time, tho’ not of his hand, where the Christ is fully Clad ; he has the very same large Drapery, but one under it that covers his Breast, Arm, and Legs down to the Feet. Every thing else is pretty near the same with the Carton.

dress · robe · habit



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

1 quotations

Quotation

The Robes, and other Habits of the Figures ; their Attendants, and Ensigns of Authority, or Dignity, as Crowns, Maces, &c. help to express their Distinct Characters ; and commonly even their Place in the Composition. The Principal Persons, and Actors must not be put in a Corner, or towards the Extremities of the Picture, unless the Necessity of the Subject requires it. A Christ, or an Apostle must not be dress’d like an Artificer, or a Fisherman ; a Man of Quality must be distinguish’d from one of the Lower Orders of Men, as a Well-bred Man always is in Life from a Peasant. And so of the rest.
Every body knows the common, or ordinary Distinctions by Dress ; but there is one Instance of a particular kind which I will mention, as being likely to give useful Hints to this purpose, and moreover very curious. In the Carton of Giving the Keys to S.
Peter, Our Saviour is wrapt only in on large piece of white Drapery, his Left Arm, and Breast, are part of his Legs naked ; which undoubtedly was done to denote him Now to appear in his Resurrection-Body, and not as before his Crucifixion, when This Dress would have been altogether improper. And this is the more remarkable, as having been done upon second Thoughts, and after the Picture was perhaps finish’d, which I know by having a Drawing of this Carton, very old, and probably made in Rafaëlle’s time, tho’ not of his hand, where the Christ is fully Clad ; he has the very same large Drapery, but one under it that covers his Breast, Arm, and Legs down to the Feet. Every thing else is pretty near the same with the Carton.

drapery · habit · robe



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

2 quotations

Quotation

[…] le bon sens, & la qualité de la matiere doivent déterminer le Peintre à donner aux objets qu'il aura choisis les places qui leur conviennent pour remplir les devoirs d'une bonne composition.
[…] Car l'œconomie dépend de la qualité du sujet, qui est tantôt patetique & tantôt enjoué, tantôt heroïque & tantôt populaire, tantôt tendre & tantôt terrible, & enfin qui demande plus ou moins de mouvement, selon qu'il est plus ou moins vif ou tranquille. Mais si le sujet inspire au Peintre une bonne œconomie dans la distribution des objets, la bonne distribution de son côté sert merveilleusement à exprimer le sujet. Elle donne de la force & de la grace aux choses qui sont inventées ; elle tire les figures de la confusion, & fait que ce que l'on represente est plus net, plus sensible & plus capable d'appeller, & d'arrêter son Spectateur.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

{Les Draperies} Que les Draperies soient bien jettées, que les plis en soient grands, en petit nombre autant qu’il est possible, & bien contrastées ; que les étofes en soient épaisses, ou légeres selon la qualité & la convenance des figures ; qu'elles soient quelquefois ouvragées & d'espèce différente & quelquefois simple, suivant la convenance des sujets & des endroits du Tableau, qui demandent plus ou moins d’éclat pour l’ornement du Tableau & pour l'oeconomie du tout ensemble.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

1 quotations

Quotation

Aengaende voor eerst de Leeringh, {I. De Leer-tijt.} die moetmen vroeg beginnen, voorsichtigh aenleggen, ende van alles dat de algemeene Teyken-Konst, Bouw-konst, Perspectijf, Mensch-kunde, Ordineeringh ende Coloreeringh aengaet, neerstigh doorsoecken, ende arbeyden om van jonghs aen, sulcken fixen ende vaerdigen maniere aen te nemen, datmen in geene dingen verlegen blijve; noch oyt een arbeytsame pijlijckheyt in sijne Konst-Wercken en laet blijcken, maer de rechte eenvoudigheyt der nature kome te vertoonen; welcke alleen ende oock niet anders verkregen wordt, dan, na datmen van alles goede fondamenten geleyt heeft, want die Jongelingen welcke vande voornaemste gronden der Konsten weynigh wercks maecken, geven weynigh hope van seer geleert daer in te werden.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] First of all regarding the Education, {I. The Apprenticeship.} one should start it early, starting carefully, and diligently investigating all that concerns the general Art of Drawing, Architecture, Perspective, Anatomy, Composition and Coloring, and working to obtain such a firm and able manner right from childhood, that one will not be lacking in anything; nor ever show a laborious grieve in his Art Works, but display the true simplicity of nature; which is then only obtained after one has taken good principles of everything, because those young men who do not put that much work in the main principles of the Arts, have little hope to become very learned in them.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

2 quotations

Quotation

Traveller.
           
I must then repeat to you what I told you at our first Meeting [ndr : Dialogue I, « Explaining the Art of Painting »] ; which is, That the Art of Painting has three Parts ; which are, Design, Colouring, and Invention ; and under this third, is that which we call Disposition ; which is properly the Order in which all the Parts of the Story are disposed, so as to produce one effect according to the Design of the Painter ; and that is the first Effect which a good Piece of History is to produce in the Spectator ; that is, if it be a Picture of a joyful Event, that all that is in it be Gay and Smiling, to the very Landskips, Houses, Heavens, Cloaths, &c. And that all the Aptitudes tend to Mirth. The same, if the Story be Sad, or Solemn ; and so for the rest. And a Piece that does not do this at first sight, is most certainly faulty though it never so well Designed, or never so well Coloured ; nay, though there be Learning and Invention in it ; for as a Play that is designed to make me Laugh, is most certainly an ill one if it makes me Cry. So an Historical Piece that doth not produce the Effect it is designed for, cannot pretend to an Excellency, though it be never so finely Painted.



Other conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Quotation

A Painter is allow’d sometimes to depart even from Natural, and Historical Truth.
Thus in the Carton of the Draught of Fishes
Rafaëlle has made a Boat too little to hold the Figures he has plac’d in it ; and this is so visible, that Some are apt to Triumph over that great Man, […] ; but the Truth is, had he made the Boat large enough for those Figures his Picture would have been all Boat, which would have had a Disagreeable Effect ; […].



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition

1 quotations

Quotation

La belle Composition dans l’art du Peintre, est la partie qui invente, qui dispose, qui embelit, qui donne la grace & l’expression, & qui prononce l’ouvrage. On pourroit apeller cette partie de la Peinture, un assemblage élegant de plusieurs parties qui font un tout, & de plusieurs corps respectez avec leur plan & leur fond sur une superficie, par le concours de plusieurs couleurs. […] c’est à la composition de donner l’elegance à toute sorte d’imitations, comme c’est au Dessein d’en regler la proportion, & au Coloris d’y ajouter la couleur. En un mot c’est la faculté, l’art de se servir du Dessein et du Coloris avec elegance, en imitant les corps visibles tels qu’ils sont ou qu’ils peuvent étre dans leur plus bel agreément.



Other conceptual field(s)

1 quotations

Quotation

Are. Il paroit par ce qui a eté dit jusqu’ici, que l’invention vient de deux sources, de l’histoire, & de l’esprit du peintre. L’histoire lui fournit simplement la matiere ; mais l’esprit, outre l’ordre & la convenance, produit les attitudes, les diversités, & pour ainsi dire, l’expression des figures ; ce qui est une partie qui lui est commune avec le dessein. Il suffit de dire, que le peintre ne doit point etre negligent en aucune des parties de l’invention, & qu’il ne choisisse qu’un nombre convenable de figures ; considerant qu’il les presente aux yeux des spectateurs, qui embarassés par la trop grande quantité se degoutent ; d’autant plus qu’il n’est pas vraisemblable, qu’en un seul, & meme tems, on leur represente tant de choses.



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire
L’ARTISTE → qualités
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → génie, esprit, imagination
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Pour la maniere des Etoffes, soit Brocard ou Broderie, dont quelques Peintres Modernes ont affecté de revêtir des Anges pour exprimer leur differants degrez de charges & d'honneur dans le Ciel. L'Academie en a desaprouvé l'usage, & fit observer en second lieu la qualité des figures Allegoriques où l'on n'est point assujetti à aucune mode, qu'il suffit d'ajuster les draperies d'une maniere agreable pour cacher les parties deshonnêtes ou deplaisantes à la vuë, & conserver soigneusement ce qui marque la proportion, évitant de traverser l'étenduë par des petits plis enfonsés que l'on doit renger à l'endroit des jointures.

brocard · broderie · drapperie



Other conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → règles et préceptes
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

1 quotations

Quotation

[…] de la proportion suivent & resultent divers & tres-importans effects, le principal desquels est la majesté & la beauté aux corps, que Vitruve appelle Eurithmie. C’est pourquoy lorsqu'on voit une chose qui est bien composée, l'on dit qu'elle est belle : en un mot, on ne doit entendre autre chose par la proportion, que la beauté deuë à toutes les choses, par laquelle les yeux corporels viennent à recevoir tous les plaisirs que l’on peut gouster par le sens de la veuë, & penetrer par l'œil de l'entendement.

Terme traduit par EURITHMIA dans Lomazzo, 1585, p. 33.

beauté · majesté



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → grandeur et noblesse

1 quotations

Quotation

Traveller.
           
I must then repeat to you what I told you at our first Meeting [ndr : Dialogue I, « Explaining the Art of Painting »] ; which is, That the Art of Painting has three Parts ; which are, Design, Colouring, and Invention ; and under this third, is that which we call Disposition ; which is properly the Order in which all the Parts of the Story are disposed, so as to produce one effect according to the Design of the Painter ; and that is the first Effect which a good Piece of History is to produce in the Spectator ; that is, if it be a Picture of a joyful Event, that all that is in it be Gay and Smiling, to the very Landskips, Houses, Heavens, Cloaths, &c. And that all the Aptitudes tend to Mirth. The same, if the Story be Sad, or Solemn ; and so for the rest. And a Piece that does not do this at first sight, is most certainly faulty though it never so well Designed, or never so well Coloured ; nay, though there be Learning and Invention in it ; for as a Play that is designed to make me Laugh, is most certainly an ill one if it makes me Cry. So an Historical Piece that doth not produce the Effect it is designed for, cannot pretend to an Excellency, though it be never so finely Painted.



Other conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

3 quotations

Quotation

In Expression we must Regard the Sex, Man must appear more Resolute and Vigorous, his Actions more Free, Firm and Bold ; but Womans Actions more Tender, Easy and Modest.
            We must likewise Regard the
Age, whose different Times and Degrees carry them to different Actions, as well by the Agitations of the Minde as the Motions of the Body.
            We must also take Notice of the
Condition, if they be Men of great Extent and Honour, their Actions must be Reserv’d and Grave ; but if Plebeians, more Rude and Disorderly.
           
Bodys Deifyd must be Retrench’d of all those Corruptible Things which serve only for the Preservation of Humane Life, as the Veins, Nerves, Arterys ; and taking onely what serve for Beauty and Form.
            We must likewise observe to give to
Man Actions of Understanding ; to Children, Actions which only Express the Motions of their Passions ; to Brutes, purely the Motions of Sence.
[...].
            Nor is it sufficient that we observe
Action and Passion in their own Natures, in the Complection and Constitution ; in the Age, Sexe, and Condition : but we must likewise observe the Season of the Year in which we express them.
            The
Spring ; Merry, Nimble, Prompt and of a good Colour. The Summer, causeth Open and Wearisome Actions, Subject to sweating and Redness. Automn, Doutbfull, and something Inclining to Melancholly. Winter, Restrain’d, drawn in and Trembling.
[...].



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

However I will here make him [ndr : au lecteur] an Offer of an Abstract of what I take to be those by which a Painter, or Connoisseur, may safely conduct himself, [...] II. The Expression must be Proper to the Subject, and the Characters of the Persons ; It must be strong, so that the Dumb-shew may be perfectly Well, and Readily understood. Every Part of the Picture must contribute to This End ; Colours, Animals, Draperies, and especially the Actions of the Figures, and above all the Airs of the Heads.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions

Quotation

Of EXPRESSION
Whatever the general Character of the Story is, the Picture must discover it throughout, whether it be Joyous, Melancholy, Grave, Terrible, &c. The Nativity, Resurrection, and Ascension ought to have the General Colouring, the Ornaments, Background, and every thing in them Riant, and Joyous, and the contrary in a Crucifixion, Interment, or a Pietà. [The Blessed Virgin with the dead Christ].
But a Distinction must be made between Grave, and Melancholy, as in a Holy Family (of
Rafaëlle’s Design at least) which I have, and has been mention’d already ; the Colouring is Brown, and Solemn, but yet all together the Picture has not a Dismal Air, but quite otherwise. […] There are certain Sentiments of Awe, and Devotion which ought to be rais’d by the first Sight of Pictures of that Subject, which that Solemn Colouring contributes very much to, but not the more Bright, though upon other Occasions preferable.
I have seen a fine Instance of a Colouring proper for Melancholy Subjects in a Pietà of Van-Dyck : That alone would make one not only Grave, but sad at first Sight ; And a Colour’d Drawing that I have of the Fall of Phaëton after Giulio Romano, shews how much This contributes to the Expression. ‘Tis different from any Colouring that ever I saw, and admirably adapted to the Subject, there is a Reddish Purple Tinct spread throughout, as if the World was all invelopp’d in Smould’ring Fire.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

3 quotations

Quotation

On peut encore remarquer l'observation de cette maxime de Mr. le Poussain dans un Tableau du Miracle de Nôtre-Seigneur, en guerissant deux aveugles [ndr : Les Aveugles de Jéricho ou Le Christ guérissant les aveugles], où tout ce qui accompagne cette expression est grand, majestueux, & serieux, tant dans les actions que dans les habillemens des figures, les couleurs & la disposition du Paysage ; [...] mais pour ne rien obmettre de ce qui étoit essentiel au sujet, il avoit exprimé dans le petit nombre de figures qui accompagnent Nôtre-Seigneur tous les mouvemens & les passions qui pouvoient convenir en cette rencontre, l'incredulité & l'indifference des Juifs, la curiosité, la derision, & la mocquerie des Pharisiens, la foi, l'admiration & le zele des Disciples, le respect, la devotion & le grand desir des affligés. [...] d'où l'on conclut qu'un Peintre peut bien accompagner l'expression de son sujet de quelques figures allegoriques pour marquer & citer le lieu, où il se rencontre, mais comme par des statuës qui n'ont nulle part aux mouvements des figures qui expriment le sujet, que n'ayant que cette sorte de langage pour exprimer ses belles conceptions, il ne seroit pas juste de lui en ôter la liberté, c'est ce qui a fait dire que la Peinture est une Poesie muette, & la Rhetorique des Peintres.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

Le mot d’Expression se confond ordinairement en parlant de Peinture avec celui de Passion. Ils different néanmoins en ce que, Expression est un terme general qui signifie la representation d’un objet selon le caractere de sa nature, & selon le tour que le Peintre a dessein de lui donner pour la convenance de son ouvrage.


Quotation

4°. L’expression qui consiste à representer naturellement les figures, leurs gestes & leurs passions, doit se faire avec précaution ; c’est-à-dire, que l’on doit dans les sujets que l’on veut peindre, avoir égard à la bien-séance, & ne pas permettre qu’aucune action indécente, & qui puisse blesser la modestie & la pudeur, s’y rencontre.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions

Quotation

Every Figure, and Animal must be affected in the Picture as one should suppose they Would, or Ought to be. And all the Expressions of the several Passions, and Sentiments must be made with regard to the Characters of the Persons moved in them. At the Raising of Lazarus, some may be allow’d to be made to hold something before their Noses, and this would be very just, to denote That Circumstance in the Story, the Time he had been dead ; but this is exceedingly improper in the laying our Lord in the Sepulchre, altho’ he had been dead much longer than he was ; however Pordenone has done it.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions

2 quotations

Quotation

The Robes, and other Habits of the Figures ; their Attendants, and Ensigns of Authority, or Dignity, as Crowns, Maces, &c. help to express their Distinct Characters ; and commonly even their Place in the Composition. The Principal Persons, and Actors must not be put in a Corner, or towards the Extremities of the Picture, unless the Necessity of the Subject requires it. A Christ, or an Apostle must not be dress’d like an Artificer, or a Fisherman ; a Man of Quality must be distinguish’d from one of the Lower Orders of Men, as a Well-bred Man always is in Life from a Peasant. And so of the rest.
Every body knows the common, or ordinary Distinctions by Dress ; but there is one Instance of a particular kind which I will mention, as being likely to give useful Hints to this purpose, and moreover very curious. In the Carton of Giving the Keys to S.
Peter, Our Saviour is wrapt only in on large piece of white Drapery, his Left Arm, and Breast, are part of his Legs naked ; which undoubtedly was done to denote him Now to appear in his Resurrection-Body, and not as before his Crucifixion, when This Dress would have been altogether improper. And this is the more remarkable, as having been done upon second Thoughts, and after the Picture was perhaps finish’d, which I know by having a Drawing of this Carton, very old, and probably made in Rafaëlle’s time, tho’ not of his hand, where the Christ is fully Clad ; he has the very same large Drapery, but one under it that covers his Breast, Arm, and Legs down to the Feet. Every thing else is pretty near the same with the Carton.


Quotation

Polydore, in a Drawing of the same Subject [ndr : la descente de la croix] […] has finely express’d the Excessive Grief the Virgin, by intimating ‘twas Otherwise Inexpressible : Her Attendants discover abundance of Passion, and Sorrow in their Faces, but Hers is hid by Drapery held up by both her Hands : The whole Figure is very Compos’d, and Quiet ; no Noise, no Outrage, but great Dignity appears in her, suitable to her Character.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions

1 quotations

Quotation

Friend.
 
            What is properly the Colouring of a Piece of Painting ?
 
                        Traveller.
 
           
It is the Art of employing the Colours proper to the Subject, with a regard to the Lights and Shadows that are incident to the Story, either according to the Truth of it, or to the Painter’s Invention : [...] As for Face-Painting alone, it is to be manage another way, for there you must do precisely what Nature shows you.
           Tis true, that Beautiful Colours may be employed, but they must be such as make not your Piece like a Picture, rather than like Nature it self ; and particularly, you must observe to express the true Temper as well as the true Phisionomy of the Persoms that are Drawn ; for it would be very absurd to give a Smiling, Airy Countenance to a Melancholly Person ; or, to make a Young, Lively Woman, Heavy and Grave. ’Tis said of Apelles, that he expressed the Countenance and true Air of the Persons he Drew, to so great a degree, that several Physionomists did predict Events upon his Pictures to the Persons Drawn by him, and that with true Success. If after that, you can give your Picture a great Relievo, and make your Colours Represent the true Vivacity of Nature, you have done your Work as to that part of Painting, which is no small one, being, next to History, the most difficult to obtain ; for though there be but little Invention required, yet ‘tis necessary to have a Solid Judgment and Lively Fancy.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

1 quotations

Quotation

Das 11. Capitel. Von allerley Kleidern.
In den Gewand-mahlen ist zu vörderst dieser Unterschied zu beobachten, weil deren Form, Farben und Falten nach Alter, Stand und Stellungen der Personen nach dem Mann- und Weiblichen Geschlechte, auch nach alten und neuen Gebrauch und Mode ganz ungleich sind. 



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

1 quotations

Quotation

Traveller.
           
I must then repeat to you what I told you at our first Meeting [ndr : Dialogue I, « Explaining the Art of Painting »] ; which is, That the Art of Painting has three Parts ; which are, Design, Colouring, and Invention ; and under this third, is that which we call Disposition ; which is properly the Order in which all the Parts of the Story are disposed, so as to produce one effect according to the Design of the Painter ; and that is the first Effect which a good Piece of History is to produce in the Spectator ; that is, if it be a Picture of a joyful Event, that all that is in it be Gay and Smiling, to the very Landskips, Houses, Heavens, Cloaths, &c. And that all the Aptitudes tend to Mirth. The same, if the Story be Sad, or Solemn ; and so for the rest. And a Piece that does not do this at first sight, is most certainly faulty though it never so well Designed, or never so well Coloured ; nay, though there be Learning and Invention in it ; for as a Play that is designed to make me Laugh, is most certainly an ill one if it makes me Cry. So an Historical Piece that doth not produce the Effect it is designed for, cannot pretend to an Excellency, though it be never so finely Painted.



Other conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

2 quotations

Quotation

{V. Fidélité du sujet} 
*Que vos compositions soient conformes au texte des anciens Autheurs, aux coûtumes & aux temps.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

J'ai observé ailleurs que la fidelité de l'Histoire n'étoit pas de l'essence de la Peinture ; mais une convenance indispensable à cet Art. Et quoique le Peintre ne soit Historien que par accident, c'est toujours une grande faute que de sortir mal de ce que l'on entreprend. J'entens par la fidelité de l'Histoire, l'étroite imitation des choses vraies ou fabuleuses telles qu'elles nous sont connues par les Auteurs, ou par la Tradition. Il est sans doute que cette Imitation donne d'autant plus de force à l'Invention, & releve d'autant plus le prix du Tableau, qu'elle conserve de fidelité.
Mais si le Peintre a l'industrie de mêler dans son sujet quelque marque d'érudition qui réveille l'attention du Spectateur sans détruire la vérité de l'Histoire, s'il peut introduire quelque trait de Poësie dans les faits Historiques qui pourront le souffrir; en un mot, s'il traite ses sujets selon la licence moderée qui est permise aux Peintres & aux Poëtes, il rendra ses Inventions élevées, & s'attirera une grande distinction. La Fidélité est donc la premiere qualité de l'Histoire



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → génie, esprit, imagination
L’ARTISTE → qualités
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

2 quotations

Quotation

Tant il est vray que l’œil aime la varieté & le Contraste dans cét Art, & que le feu & la grace ne sont qu’un certain assaisonnement qui releve le naturel. En éfet ce que l’on apelle la bonne grace consiste principalement en un certain agreément, une certaine Noblesse qu’on trouve dans les yeux, dans les visages, dans l’Atitude, & dans les Contours d’une figure, lorsque la Forme, l’Action, les Draperies, sont decentes & convenables à l’âge, au sexe, & à la personne qu’on veut representer, d’où resulte la beauté et la grace. Enfin cette beauté & cette grace toujours mélées ensemble font la belle composition des figures et le comble de la perfection dans la Peinture.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition

Quotation

Il y a une proportion generale fondée sur les mesures les plus convenables pour faire une belle figure. On peut consulter & examiner ceux qui ont écrit des Proportions, & qui ont donné des mesures generales pour les figures humaines, supposé qu'ils ayent eux-mêmes consulté à fond & la Nature & la Sculpture des Anciens.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → groupe
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → antique

1 quotations

Quotation

But wheras in History the Figures have dependency on each other, a Figure by the Life (one Figure usually making the Picture) be only agreeable to it self,
            We must Consider (by divers Tryals) what
Position of Body, Action and Light best becoms the Person, and when any thing seems forcd or affected, we must Endeavour to divert them by Discours, &c.
[...].



Other conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait

1 quotations

Quotation

Celui qui représente la continence de Scipion semble un peu mieux colorié ; mais pour le coup, M. Restout me permettra de lui dire que ce sujet ne lui convenait en rien. Il s’agissoit d’y caractériser dans tout son éclat, une personne célebre par la beauté dont les charmes étoient si forts & si puissans qu’il étoit comme impossible d’y résister : On relevoit parlà adroitement, le mérite de Scipion qui eut le courage prodigieux d’en triompher ? Point du tout ; on se contente de nous croquer ici séchement une matrone de la plus mauvaise grâce du monde ; & qui n’est remarquable uniquement que par sa laideur. Ce n’est point là ce qu’il falloit encore une fois, mais M. Restout ne pouvoit pas mieux faire dans ce genre. Cet Auteur devroit bien s’étudier à mieux connoitre ce qui lui est propre. Comment pouvoit-il nous donner quelque idée de la beauté, lui qui n’a pu, encore atteindre à nous représenter des caracteres simples & ordinaires ? Je n’en veux pour exemple que ses Tableaux de Dévotion, qui sont comme on sait le fort de cet Auteur. Cependant quelles attitudes dures & forcées n’y voit-on pas ? Quelles grimaces pour des expressions ? Quels airs de tête effrayans & bizarres !



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

1 quotations

Quotation

Der dritte Discours von der Mahlerey. Das III. Capitel. Worauf über dieses in HISTORIEN-Gemählden besonders zu sehen, p. 68 
 [Ist ferner nöthig auf folgende Stücke mit Achtung zu geben]
3. Auf das Alter/ Geschlecht und Stand der Person. Daß ein Bauer keine Gestalt eines wohlgezogenen ansehnlichen Mannes ein König hingegen eine Bauer Gestalt bekomme Daher viel Mahler und unter andern der berühmte
le Brun gar die Physiognomie studierte, damit sie die Personen nach solchen Reguln desto besser distinguiren können.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

1 quotations

Quotation

{12. Prudence avoir en la distribution du mouvement.}
N’est-ce pas ce tromper de faire violent
Le geste d’un craintif, lors qu’il doit estre lent :
N’est-ce pas s’égarer et peindre à l’aventure,
De croire d’exceller en la rare Peinture,
En donnant de la force à tous genres de corps.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Das 11. Capitel. Von allerley Kleidern.
In den Gewand-mahlen ist zu vörderst dieser Unterschied zu beobachten, weil deren Form, Farben und Falten nach Alter, Stand und Stellungen der Personen nach dem Mann- und Weiblichen Geschlechte, auch nach alten und neuen Gebrauch und Mode ganz ungleich sind. 



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

2 quotations

Quotation

{27. Des Prelats & des autres personnes serieuses.}
[ndr : Le P.] On ne doit jamais peindre une action bizarre
Sous l’hermine Royale et moins sous la Tyarre.
Sans cette bien-seance un excez de chaleur
Sous le bandeau Royal feroient [sic] un basteleur ;
[…]
Prens donc garde mon fils, ce que je dis,
Et fuy, si tu les peins, les gestes estourdis.
Voy comme la posture affable et temperée
Accompagne un Prelat dans sous sa chappe dorée.
[…]
Leur maintien [ndr : du pape et et du roi] grave et doux doit par nostre artifice
Paroistre magnanime et non plein de caprice.
La plus part du beau monde a dans ses fonctions
De la grace en son geste et dans ses actions.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

[…] Il faut de plus, qu'elle [ndr : l’attitude] ait un tour, qui sans sortir de la vraisemblance, ni du caractere de la personne, jette de l’agrément dans l'action.
En effet, il n’y a rien dans l’imitation où l’on ne puisse faire entrer de la grace, ou par le choix, ou par la maniere d’imiter. Il y a de la grace dans l’expression des vices comme dans celle des vertus. […] En un mot la connoissance du caractere qui est attaché à chaque objet, & qui regarde principalement les sexes, les âges, & les conditions, est le fondement du bon choix, & la source où l’on puise les graces convenables à chaque figure.

agrément



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

1 quotations

Quotation

Men moet de Schilder-Konst niet vergeten aan te merken datter driederley Proportien in agt te nemen zijn, die hoeveelse van malkander mogten verschillen, nochtans alle binnen de Palen der mogelijkheyd moeten gehouden werden. Daar is onses agtens een Natuurlijke en Maatredige Proportie; tot welke de Proportie des Welstaans, en de Bevalligheyd moet bygevoegd werden. En soo langh de Mensch beelden na een van dese dry Geslagten, of na alle dry te gelijk verstandelijk geleeft werden, sullense buyten Berisping zijn. De twee eerste staan altijd vast; en tot de laatste neemtmen alleen sijn toevlugt, wanneer de Natuurlijke Wet-maat ophoud, of ons dregd te verlaten, dat is, wanneerse in sekere Verkiesing soodanigen gratie noch verscheyde aardige Verkrampingen niet kan toelaten, als de noodsaak en welstand, van een sonderlinge Actie ons afvorderd; In welke gevallen men sich dikmaal belemmerd en bedrayt vind; {Wanneer en hoe de dryderley Proportien geoeffend werden.} Om genoeg te laten blijken datmen de Maatredige Proportie den Bons verlaat, moetmen ’t gebrek van dien so veel sien te bedekken datmen ten minsten d’ontbeering niet ligt ontwaar werd: of soo een verstandig Oog dat ontdekken kan; soo moet de Welgeschiktheyd en Welbedagte Actie soo Deugdsaam zijn, datse den Beschouwer geheel kan innemen, en verpligten die eer te prijsen dan te veragten. Want een verstandig Mensch kan seer ligt afsien, waar en in welke geval of noodsaak, men de Schilderkundige Vryheyd, heeft weten tot sijn voordeel aan te grijpen of waar het verstand heeft stil gestaan.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] One should not neglect to mention regarding the Art of Painting that there are three types of Proportion to take into account, which – no matter how much they may differ from eachother – nevertheless must all be considered to fall within the possibility. We believe there is a Natural and Mathematical Proportion; to which the Proportion of Harmony and the Gracefulness should be added. And as long as the Human Figures occur judiciously according to one of these three Types or to all three simultaneously, they will be without Reprimand. The first two are fixed; and one may only resort to the latter, when the Natural Law of Mesure seizes to exist or threatens to leave us, that is, when she cannot allow such grace nor different nice Contortions in a certain Decision, if the necessity and harmony of a special Action demands from us; In which cases one often finds himself impeded and obstructed; {When and how the three sorts of Proportion should be practiced.} To show sufficiently that one leaves the Mathematical Proportion, one should attempt to hide the flaws of it as much as possible so that at least the deprivation is not easily recognized: or so that a wise Eye can discover it; as such the well-composed and well-invented Action are so virtuous, that they can conquer the Spectator completely, and oblige him to praise it rather than to despise it. Since a sensible Man can easily understand, where and in which case or necessity one has managed to use the painterly Freedom to his advantage or where the mind did not function.

bevalligheid



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion

2 quotations

Quotation

Pareillement dans la disposition des habits on observa trois choses ; premierement la qualité des personnes que le Peintre [ndr : Nicolas Poussin dans le tableau Les Israélites recueillant la manne dans le désert] a voulu rendre reconnoisables par la majesté & la grandeur des habillemens, dont les draperies quoi que tres-amples forment des plis si bien rangez qu’ils marquent precisement la jointure des membres, & ne forment que de grandes parties. Secondement en donnant à ces figures non des morceaux d’étoffes jettés au hazard, qui ne paroitroient que des lambeaux, si les figures changeoient d’action ou d’aspect, mais un veritable habit quoi que de differante façon suivant la licence que les Peintres prennent de découvrir quelqu’un des membres pour la varieté des objets, & pour faire connoître leur capacité & leur étude. En troisiéme lieu, le menagement de la pudeur du sexe, par la distinction du vêtement des femmes d’avec celui des hommes, donnant aux uns des habillements plus amples & plus longs, & aux autres des draperies plus troussées & plus serrées.

habit · vêtement · drapperie



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

Are. J’ai parlé de l’homme nud, je traitterai a present de l’homme vétu, mais en peu de mots ; parceque eu égard aux convenances, il faut, come j’ai dit, conformer l’habillement à l’usage des Nations & des conditions. Si le peintre represente un Apôtre, il ne le fera pas en habit court ; & s’il veut peindre un Capitaine, il ne lui mettra pas sur le corps une robbe, pour ainsi dire à manches pendantes. Quant aux etoffes, le peintre doit avoir egard à leur qualité ; parceque le velours fait d’autres plis, que ne fait l’ormessin ; & le lin bien delié, ne fait pas les mêmes plis qu’un gros drap : Il faut de même ranger les plis à leur place, en sorte qu’ils laissent voir le dessous, & qu’ils tournent adroittement du coté qu’ils doivent aller, mais non pas de manier qu’ils coupent, ou que le drap paroisse attaché à la peau. Et comme une trop grande secheresse rend la figure pauvre, & ne la rend pas gracieuse, de même trop de plis causent de la confusion, & ne plaisent pas. Il faut donc emploier ici ce milieu si estimé en toutes choses.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

1 quotations

Quotation

(maximes générales et essentielles)
I. Que dans la Composition d’une Histoire, la Vérité soit premierement fort exacte et pure.
II. Qu’on ait une grande considération du Lieu oû elle sera représentée.
III. Qu’on prenne bien garde à ne pas descouvrir jamais les parties qui ne se peuvent monstrer honnestement. Cette maxime a toûjours esté parmi eux une telle recommendation, que mesme ils souffroient plutost que l’Histoire demeurast defectueuse en quelque chose, que de passer au delà des bornes de la modestie.
IIII. Et enfin, pour le quatriesme degré de perfection,
Qu’on trouve moyen de représenter les choses noblement, ingenieusement, et d’une manière grande et magnifique.
Voilà les quatre Parties principales, qui sont le concert, et pour ainsi dire l’harmonie de la Peinture, par la juste relation qu’elles ont entre elles ; Ce que nos Critiques rechercheront rigoureusement dans l'Ouvrage qu'on leur présente ; où j'ai bien peur qu'ils ne trouvent pas assez leur conte pour le sucés de la pretention de nostre Moderne.



Other conceptual field(s)

3 quotations

Quotation

De schoonheyd van ’t lichaem bestaet in een sekere Symmetrie die de ghedeelten der lichaems met malckander en met het gheheele hebben, seght Stobeaus Ecolog. Ethic. Cap.5. Een lichaem, het welcke in alle sijne gedeelten schoon is, wordt voor veele schoonder ghehouden, dan de bysondere schoone leden die ’t geheele lichaem door een ordentelicke schickelickheyd opmaecken, seght St Augustinus Lib. III. Dulciloqu. Cap. 26. Want indien ’t eene of ’t andere onser lede-maeten van de rest afghesneden sijnde, alleen by sich selven besichtight wordt, seght Dionys. Longinus {De sublimi orat. 35.}, het en sal gantsch gheene aensienlickheyd hebben; vermids de rechte volmaecktheyd maer alleen in d’over-een-kominge van alle de leden bestaet; wanneerse naemelick door haere onderlinghe ghemeynschap een lichaem gheworden sijnde, met eenen oock daer in door den hand der Harmonie aen alle kanten worden opghesloten.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] The beauty of the body exists in a certain Symmetry that the parts of the body have with each other and with the whole, says Stobeaus Ecolog. Ethic. Cap. 5. A body, which is beautiful in all its parts, is thought to be much more beautiful, than the separate beautiful parts that form the body by means of an orderly compliancy, says St Augustinus Lib. III. Dulciloqu. Cap. 26. Because if the one or the other of our bodyparts, being cut off from the rest, are looked at on their own, says Dionys. Longinus {…}, it will not have any importance; as the true perfection only exists in the correspondence of all the parts; namely, once they have become a body by means of their mutual resemblance, they are immediately from all sides captured in it by the hand of Harmony.

Junius connects the esthetical concept of beauty (schoonheid) to that of symmetry (symmetrie). He refers to the human body, in which all the different parts should be in harmony (harmonie) with each other. Junius does not refer directly to art in this extract. The citation from St Augustine, where this term occurs, is missing in the English edition. [MO]


Quotation

[…] is best zich in eenzaamheid te begeeven, voorzien van papier, pen en int of kreon, en wanneer het bestek der ordinantie, het zy in de hoogten of lengte, vast gesteld is, dan het planum of de grond aangewezen, en het oogpunt gezet, […]Dit gedaan zynde, zo vergaderd uwe zinnen by één om het voorgenomene te onderzoeken, en gevoegelykst het zelve te vertoonen, benevens welke perzonaadien, […] Is 'er noch een andere party die minder te zeggen heeft, en echter tot de volmaaking vereist word, dat de schikking of ordinantie betreft; wyst zulks met stippen op zyn plaats aan, zonder u te verwarren, want als het voornaamste wel geplaatst is, volgd het overige van zelf. Dus verre het gebracht hebbende, zo is het genoeg om wanneer, het u behaagd de zaak te hervatten en uit te pluyzen, weder-om met de voornaamste perzoonen beginnende; overweeg dan door welke hertstogten zy bewoogen zyn […] hoe zy Contrasteeren […]Teeken dit alles op een tweede stuk papier […] Vald dan met nieuwe lust, nu en dan, daar weder aan, overleggende wat naakt of gekleed, schoon of gemeen moet wezen, benevens de schakeering der koleuren, hare harmonie en reddering, dus werd het voltooid; en dit is myns oordeels het heilzaamste middel, om u geheugen te ontlasten en te hulp te komen.

[D'après DE LAIRESSE 1787, p. 108-110:] Le meilleur moyen pour prévenir ce désagrément, c’est de se retirer dans un lieu tranquille, muni de papier & de crayons ; & après qu’on aura arrêté la grandeur du champ que doit remplir la composition qu’on se propose de mettre sur la toile, on commencera par en indiquer les plans & par fixer le point de vue […] Ensuite on recueillera ses esprits pour examiner le sujet qu’on projette d’exécuter, ainsi que la manière la plus convenable de le disposer, de même que de grouper les principaux personnages […] Quant aux accessoires, on ne fera que les indiquer par des points jusqu’à ce qu’on mette ensemble la composition ; car lorsque les principaux objets sont bien placés, les autres suivent d’eux-mêmes la disposition générale. Ce travail étant fini, on le reprendra pour examiner avec soin ce qu’on aura fait, en commençant de nouveau par les principales figures, & en considérant quelle est la passion qui doit les faire agir […] de quelle manière elles doivent contraster entr’elles […] On tracera tout cela sur un autre morceau de papier […] examiner quelles figures doivent rester nues, quelles autres ont besoin d’être drapées ; ce qui demande un caractère noble ou commun ; pour passer ensuite à la disposition générale des couleurs locales & à leur harmonie : de cette manière, on parviendra à terminer l’ouvrage avec une grande facilité sans se fatiguer la mémoire


Quotation

Drie zaaken worden in een bekwaam Tafereelschryver vereischt: namentlyk, een naauwkeurige kennis van de Geschiedenissen, nevens die van der zelver beste Schryvers: ten tweeden, een goede ondervindinge of kennisse der Oudheid: ten derden, een aangenaame en nette Poësy [...] De bevalligheid der Poësy word vereischt, {Hoe verre de Dichtkonst daar in te pas komt.} om dat zy is in een geschilderd Tafereel de harmonie of welvoegelykheid der koleuren: maar als alle die schoone hoedaanigheden wel waargenomen zyn, kan het noch geen volmaakt Tafereel te voorschyn brengen, indien 'er de Schilderkonst niet by gevoegd is, zonder dewelke het onmogelyk een goed Tafereel kan weezen […]

[D'après DE LAIRESSE 1787, p. 212:] Un peintre d’histoire, pour parvenir à la perfection, doit d’abord avoir une connaissance bien approfondie des meilleurs historiens & poëtes, ainsi que de l’antiquité. Il faut de plus qu’il soit doué d’un esprit poétique […]NDR : la grâce de] L’esprit poétique est nécessaire pour mettre de l’harmonie dans le coloris du tableau. Cependant ces qualités ne suffisent pas pour produire un bon ouvrage, si l’invention & la composition ne concourent pas à en former un bon ensemble […]



Other conceptual field(s)

4 quotations

Quotation

[...] le Peintre devoit tellement assujettir toutes les parties qui entrent en la composition de son Tableau, qu'elles concourrent ensemble à former une juste idée du sujet, en sorte qu'elles puissent inspirer dans l'esprit des regardans des émotions convenables à cette idée, & que si il se rencontroit dans la narration de l'Histoire même, quelque circonstance qui y fut contraire, on la devoit supprimer ou si fort negliger quelle n'y pût faire aucune interruption, qu'on peut neanmoins prendre une discrette liberté de choisir des incidens favorables, ou quelque allegorie qui convienne au sujet pour la varieté du Contraste, mais que l'on doit éviter de faire paroître ensemble des choses incompatibles ; par exemple la verité des choses Saintes avec les Prophanes, ou paroître ensemble des personnes qui n'ont été qu'en des tems fort éloignés l'un de l'autre. [...] quelqu'un objecta qu'il seroit dangereux d'établir la suppression des circonstances, parce qu'elle porteroit les jeunes Peintres à négliger celles qui doivent accompagner les Histoires [...]. [...] Que les Histoires Saintes sont d'écrites pour exciter en nous des pensées & des émotions de pieté, par les bons exemples quelles nous proposent, & que ce doit aussi être l'effet de la Peinture, ce qui seroit detourné par des circonstances qui porteroient des caracteres differens ou opposez à l'idée du sujet.

Par ailleurs, une partie de ce passage de Testelin est repris par Florent Le Comte dans son Cabinet des singularitez (...), plus précisément aux pages 41-42 de son édition de 1699-1700 (Paris, Etienne Picart & Nicolas Le Clerc, tome I, vol. I).

sujet



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

J'ai observé ailleurs que la fidelité de l'Histoire n'étoit pas de l'essence de la Peinture ; mais une convenance indispensable à cet Art. Et quoique le Peintre ne soit Historien que par accident, c'est toujours une grande faute que de sortir mal de ce que l'on entreprend. J'entens par la fidelité de l'Histoire, l'étroite imitation des choses vraies ou fabuleuses telles qu'elles nous sont connues par les Auteurs, ou par la Tradition. Il est sans doute que cette Imitation donne d'autant plus de force à l'Invention, & releve d'autant plus le prix du Tableau, qu'elle conserve de fidelité.
Mais si le Peintre a l'industrie de mêler dans son sujet quelque marque d'érudition qui réveille l'attention du Spectateur sans détruire la vérité de l'Histoire, s'il peut introduire quelque trait de Poësie dans les faits Historiques qui pourront le souffrir; en un mot, s'il traite ses sujets selon la licence moderée qui est permise aux Peintres & aux Poëtes, il rendra ses Inventions élevées, & s'attirera une grande distinction. La Fidélité est donc la premiere qualité de l'Histoire



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → génie, esprit, imagination
L’ARTISTE → qualités
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

Are. A mon avis cela enseigne, que dans tout le contenu d’une histoire qui embrasse plusieurs figures, on doit faire un tout ensemble qui soit bien d’accord. Si par exemple je voulois peindre la manne qui tomba dans le desert ; je devrois faire en sorte que tous les Hebreux representés dans cette occasion, ramassassent ce pain celeste avec differentes attitudes, qui montrassent toutes un tres grand desir, une joye excessive, & qui fissent voir qu’aucun d’eux n’etoit negligent : come il paroit dans le tableau de Rafael, qui outre cela a imaginé un veritable desert avec des edifices de bois convenables au tems, & au lieu ; & à donné à Moyse un air grave, l’habit long jusqu’à terre, la taille grande & venerable; & à donné pareillement aux femmes juifves des habits brodés, comme elles avoient coutume d’en porter.



Other conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → groupe
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude

Quotation

Art. […] Je dois dire aussi, car il ne faut pas taire la verité, que celui qui a travaillé dans la salle qu’on appelle d’en haut, aupres du tableau de la bataille peinte par Titien, s’est trompé dans l’histoire de l’excommunication lancée par Alexandre III. contre Frederic Barberousse. Aiant representé Rome dans sa composition, il me paroit qu’il a lourdement peché contre la convenance en y mettant un si grand nombre de Senateurs Venitiens, qui hors de propos sont spectateurs ; parcequ’il n’est pas vraisemblable qu’ils s’y trouvassent tous en meme tems, & ils n’ont rien à faire avec l’histoire. Au contraire Titien observa à merveille, & en perfection la convenance dans le tableau ou Frederic se baisse, & s’humilie devant le Pape, lui baisant les pieds : il y a peint judicieusement le Bembe, le Navager, & le Sannazare, qui regardent la fonction. Quoique le fait soit arrivé long tems auparavant ; il n’est pas extraordinaire qu’il ait imaginé les deux premiers dans Venise leur patrie ; & il n’est pas hors de toute vraisemblance que le troisieme s’y soit trouvé. Outre cela il n’y a pas un grand inconvenient qu’un des premiers peintres du monde conservât dans ses ouvrages la memoire, & les portraits des trois premiers poetes, & savans de notre tems, dont deux etoient nobles Venitiens ; & le troisieme avoit tant d’amour pour cette illustre ville de Venise, que dans une des ses Epigrammes, il la prefere à Rome.



Other conceptual field(s)

2 quotations

Quotation

Traveller.
           
I must then repeat to you what I told you at our first Meeting [ndr : Dialogue I, « Explaining the Art of Painting »] ; which is, That the Art of Painting has three Parts ; which are, Design, Colouring, and Invention ; and under this third, is that which we call Disposition ; which is properly the Order in which all the Parts of the Story are disposed, so as to produce one effect according to the Design of the Painter ; and that is the first Effect which a good Piece of History is to produce in the Spectator ; that is, if it be a Picture of a joyful Event, that all that is in it be Gay and Smiling, to the very Landskips, Houses, Heavens, Cloaths, &c. And that all the Aptitudes tend to Mirth. The same, if the Story be Sad, or Solemn ; and so for the rest. And a Piece that does not do this at first sight, is most certainly faulty though it never so well Designed, or never so well Coloured ; nay, though there be Learning and Invention in it ; for as a Play that is designed to make me Laugh, is most certainly an ill one if it makes me Cry. So an Historical Piece that doth not produce the Effect it is designed for, cannot pretend to an Excellency, though it be never so finely Painted.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire

Quotation

But these Liberties [ndr : prises envers la vérité historique et naturelle] must be taken with great Caution and Judgment ; for in the main, Historical, and Natural Truth must be observed, the Story may be embellish’d, or something of it par’d away, but still So as it may be immediately known ; nor must any thing be contrary to Nature but upon great Necessity, and apparent Reason. History must not be corrupted, and turn’d into Fable or Romance : Every Person, and Thing must be made to sustain its proper Character ; and not only the Story, but the Circumstances must be observ’d, the Scene of Action, the Countrey, or Place, the Habits, Arms, Manners, Proportions, and the like, must correspond. This is call’d the observing the Costûme.

story



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

2 quotations

Quotation

Are. […] Venons à la convenance : Rafael ne s’en eloigna jamais. Mais il fit les petits* enfants tels qu’ils sont doüillets & tendres, les hommes robustes, & les femmes avec cette delicatesse qui leur convient.
Fab. Et quoi le grand Michel Ange n’a-t-il donc pas gardé aussi cette convenance ?
Are. Si j’avois envie de vous plaire, & à ses partisans, je dirois qu’oüi : mais si je dois dire la verité, je dirai que non. Quoique vous voiez bien dans les tableaux de Michel Ange la distinction en general des âges, & des sexes (ce que tout le monde sait faire) vous ne la trouverez pourtant pas dans l’arrangement des muscles. Je ne veux pas me mettre à critiquer ses ouvrages, tant par le respect que j’ai pour lui, & que merite un si grand homme, que parcequ’il n’est pas necessaire. Mais que direz vous de l’honneteté ? croiez vous qu’il soit à propos pour faire voir les difficultés de l’art, de decouvrir toujours sans respect les parties nûes des figures, que la modestie, & la pudeur tiennent cachées, sans avoir egard ni a la sainteté des personnes qu’on represente, ni au lieu ou elles sont representées ?
[…]
 
* Dans son tems Titien pour la tendresse le surpassoit beaucoup, & depuis François du Quenoi dit le Flamand.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

Quotation

Are. Je ne sçais si vous avez vû chez notre ami Dolce le dessein de la Roxane de la main de Rafael, qui a deja êté gravé sur cuivre.
Fab. Je ne m’en souviens pas.
Are. C’est un dessein de Rafael lavé & rehaussé de blanc, representant le couronnement de Roxane, qui etoit une tres belle Dame qu’Alexandre le grand aima eperdûement ; on le voit vis a vis d’elle lui presentant la couronne : Roxane est assise auprés d’un lit dans une attitude respectueuse & timide ; elle est toute nûe, excepté pour regarder la pudeur, un linge fin & delicat lui couvre ce qu’on doit cacher. […] Ils ont tous des airs, & des attitudes differentes, & sont tres beaux. Dans cette composition Rafael s’est tenu à l’histoire, à la convenance, & à l’honnéteté.

Dans cette citation, l'honnêteté, associée à l'histoire et à la convenance, est implicitement présentée comme une "partie" de la peinture.


1 quotations

Quotation

HIer is geen twyffel aan, dat men veel voordeel ontmoet, in het opschilderen van een welgedoodverwd stuk, in welk een goede houding, koleur en welstand is waargenomen. Wy behoeven onze gedachten niet meer daar mede te bezwaaren, maar kunnen met een dubb'le ernst die elders op aanleggen, zo om byzondere gedeeltens zuyver en zindelyk aan te leggen, die op te maaken, en op de voorige welstand verder te arbeiden.

[D'après DE LAIRESSE 1738, p. 7:] If a Piece be well dead-coloured, and have a good Harmony and Decorum, we certainly render the second Colouring the more easy ; for then we can unbend our first general Thoughts, and apply them solely to lay neatly and finish particular Parts, and so to work on the former good Ground.



Other conceptual field(s)

2 quotations

Quotation

Je trouve trois sortes de Vrai dans la Peinture.
Le Vrai Simple,
Le Vrai Ideal,
Et le Vrai Composé, ou le Vrai Parfait.
Le Vrai Simple que j’appelle le premier Vrai, est une imitation simple & fidelle des mouvemens expressifs de la Nature, & des objets tels que le Peintre les a choisis pour modele, & qu’ils se presentent d’abord à nos yeux, en sorte que les Carnations paroissent de veritables Chairs, […] que par l’intelligence du clair-obscur & de l’union des couleurs, les objets qui sont peints paroissent de relief, & le tout ensemble harmonieux.
Ce Vrai Simple trouve dans toutes sortes de naturels les moyens de conduire le Peintre à sa fin, qui est une sensible & vive imitation de la Nature […].
Le Vrai Ideal est un choix de diverses perfections qui ne se trouvent jamais dans un seul modele ; mais qui se tirent de plusieurs & ordinairement de l’Antique.
Ce Vrai Ideal comprend l’abondance des pensées, la richesse des inventions, la convenance des attitudes, l’élégance des contours, le choix des belles expressions, le beau jet des draperies, enfin tout ce qui peut sans alterer le premier Vrai le rendre plus piquant & plus convenable. Mais toutes ces perfections ne pouvant subsister que dans l’idée par raport à la Peinture, ont besoin d’un sujet légitime qui les conserve & qui les fasse paroître avec avantage ; & ce sujet légitime est le Vrai Simple : […] c’est-à-dire, un sujet bien disposé pour les recevoir & les faire subsister, […]. Il paroît donc que ces deux Vrais, le Vrai Simple & le Vrai Ideal font un composé parfait, dans lequel ils se prêtent un mutuel secours, avec cette particularité, que le premier Vrai perce & se fait sentir au travers de toutes les perfections qui lui sont jointes.
Le troisiéme Vrai qui est composé du Vrai Simple & du Vrai Ideal fait par cette jonction le dernier achevement de l’Art, & la parfaite imitation de la belle Nature. C’est ce beau Vraisemblable qui paroît souvent plus vrai que la verité-même, parce que dans cette jonction le premier Vrai saisit le Spectateur, sauve plusieurs négligences, & se fait sentir le premier sans qu’on y pense. […]
Ce troisiéme Vrai, est un but où personne n’a encore frappé ; on peut dire seulement que ceux qui en ont le plus approché sont les plus habiles. Le Vrai Simple & le Vrai Ideal ont été partagés selon le génie & l’éducation des Peintres, qui les ont possedés. Georgion, Titien, Pordenon, le vieux Palme, les Bassans, & toute l’Ecole Venitienne n’ont point eu d’autre merite que d’avoir possedé le premier Vrai. Et Leonard de Vinci, Raphaël, Jules Romain, Polidore de Caravage, le Poussin, & quelques autres de l’Ecole Romaine, ont établi leur plus grande reputation par le Vrai Ideal ; mais sur-tout Raphaël, qui outre les beautés du Vrai Ideal a possedé une partie considerable du Vrai Simple, & par ce moyen a plus approché du Vrai parfait qu’aucun de sa Nation.



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → génie, esprit, imagination

Quotation

J'ai observé ailleurs que la fidelité de l'Histoire n'étoit pas de l'essence de la Peinture ; mais une convenance indispensable à cet Art. Et quoique le Peintre ne soit Historien que par accident, c'est toujours une grande faute que de sortir mal de ce que l'on entreprend. J'entens par la fidelité de l'Histoire, l'étroite imitation des choses vraies ou fabuleuses telles qu'elles nous sont connues par les Auteurs, ou par la Tradition. Il est sans doute que cette Imitation donne d'autant plus de force à l'Invention, & releve d'autant plus le prix du Tableau, qu'elle conserve de fidelité.
Mais si le Peintre a l'industrie de mêler dans son sujet quelque marque d'érudition qui réveille l'attention du Spectateur sans détruire la vérité de l'Histoire, s'il peut introduire quelque trait de Poësie dans les faits Historiques qui pourront le souffrir; en un mot, s'il traite ses sujets selon la licence moderée qui est permise aux Peintres & aux Poëtes, il rendra ses Inventions élevées, & s'attirera une grande distinction. La Fidélité est donc la premiere qualité de l'Histoire



Other conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → génie, esprit, imagination
L’ARTISTE → qualités
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

2 quotations

Quotation

The Robes, and other Habits of the Figures ; their Attendants, and Ensigns of Authority, or Dignity, as Crowns, Maces, &c. help to express their Distinct Characters ; and commonly even their Place in the Composition. The Principal Persons, and Actors must not be put in a Corner, or towards the Extremities of the Picture, unless the Necessity of the Subject requires it. A Christ, or an Apostle must not be dress’d like an Artificer, or a Fisherman ; a Man of Quality must be distinguish’d from one of the Lower Orders of Men, as a Well-bred Man always is in Life from a Peasant. And so of the rest.
Every body knows the common, or ordinary Distinctions by Dress ; but there is one Instance of a particular kind which I will mention, as being likely to give useful Hints to this purpose, and moreover very curious. In the Carton of Giving the Keys to S.
Peter, Our Saviour is wrapt only in on large piece of white Drapery, his Left Arm, and Breast, are part of his Legs naked ; which undoubtedly was done to denote him Now to appear in his Resurrection-Body, and not as before his Crucifixion, when This Dress would have been altogether improper. And this is the more remarkable, as having been done upon second Thoughts, and after the Picture was perhaps finish’d, which I know by having a Drawing of this Carton, very old, and probably made in Rafaëlle’s time, tho’ not of his hand, where the Christ is fully Clad ; he has the very same large Drapery, but one under it that covers his Breast, Arm, and Legs down to the Feet. Every thing else is pretty near the same with the Carton.



Other conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis