ORDER

ORDER (n.)

ORDE (nld.) · ORDENTELIJKHEID (nld.) · ORDINE (ita.) · ORDNUNG (deu.) · ORDRE (fra.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
MÉTHODE (fra.) · OPMAECKINGE (nld.) · ORDE (nld.) · ORDONNANTIE (nld.) · ORDRE (fra.) · STELLING (nld.)

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

1 sources
2 quotations

Quotation

Traveller.
            Invention
is the Manner of Expressing that Fable and Story which the Painter has chosen for the Subject of his Piece ; and may principally be divided into Order and Decorum. By the first, the Painter places the parts of his Subject properly, so as the Spectator may imagine that the thing did not happen otherwise than as it is there Represented ; and so as the whole Content of the Story, though it imbrace never so many Figures, make but one BODY, Agreeing with its self in all its Parts.
For Example : Suppose a Painter to Represent the Story of the Jews gathering Manna in the Desart ; he must so order it, that the Persons employed in the Piece do all do the same thing, though in different Aptitudes ; and there must appear in their Countenances the same Joy and Desire of this Heavenly Food ; and besides, he must Represent a Countrey proper, and give his Figures their Draperies according to the Customs and Manners of the Nation he Represents : all this Raphael has done in this very Story : and indeed, that part of Invention was so great in him, that he seldom Designed a Story in his first SCHIZZOS, that he did not do it four or five several ways, to choose at last the best. But to do this, a Painter, besides a Fanciful, Flourisihing Genius of his own, must help himself by reading both History and Fable, and Conversing with Poets and Men of Learning ; but above all, the Painter must have a care that he pitch not upon such an Invention as is beyond his Forces to perform.
Some Observations there are about the Number of Figures fit to be employed in an Historical Piece. Hannibal Carrache was of Opinion, that a Piece that contained above twelve Figures, could never be free from Confusion ; and the Reason that he used to give, was ; first, That he thought that no Piece could be well with more than three great Gruppos, or Knots of Figures : And Secondly, That that Silence and Majesty which is necessary in Painting, is lost in that Multitude and Croud of Figures. But if your Subject be such as constrains you to a Multitude, such as the Representation of a Battle, or of the Last Day of Judgement, then you are likewise dispensed from that great Care of Finishing ; but must chiefly study Union, and the disposing of your Lights and Shadows. The Painter must also take Care, that his Scene be known by his Piece at first view, by some Ingenious Invention to express the Countrey :

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → groupe
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

Traveller.
            Invention
is the Manner of Expressing that Fable and Story which the Painter has chosen for the Subject of his Piece ; and may principally be divided into Order and Decorum. By the first, the Painter places the parts of his Subject properly, so as the Spectator may imagine that the thing did not happen otherwise than as it is there Represented ; and so as the whole Content of the Story, though it imbrace never so many Figures, make but one BODY, Agreeing with its self in all its Parts.
For Example : Suppose a Painter to Represent the Story of the Jews gathering Manna in the Desart ; he must so order it, that the Persons employed in the Piece do all do the same thing, though in different Aptitudes ; and there must appear in their Countenances the same Joy and Desire of this Heavenly Food ; and besides, he must Represent a Countrey proper, and give his Figures their Draperies according to the Customs and Manners of the Nation he Represents : all this Raphael has done in this very Story : and indeed, that part of Invention was so great in him, that he seldom Designed a Story in his first SCHIZZOS, that he did not do it four or five several ways, to choose at last the best. But to do this, a Painter, besides a Fanciful, Flourisihing Genius of his own, must help himself by reading both History and Fable, and Conversing with Poets and Men of Learning ; but above all, the Painter must have a care that he pitch not upon such an Invention as is beyond his Forces to perform.
Some Observations there are about the Number of Figures fit to be employed in an Historical Piece. Hannibal Carrache was of Opinion, that a Piece that contained above twelve Figures, could never be free from Confusion ; and the Reason that he used to give, was ; first, That he thought that no Piece could be well with more than three great Gruppos, or Knots of Figures : And Secondly, That that Silence and Majesty which is necessary in Painting, is lost in that Multitude and Croud of Figures. But if your Subject be such as constrains you to a Multitude, such as the Representation of a Battle, or of the Last Day of Judgement, then you are likewise dispensed from that great Care of Finishing ; but must chiefly study Union, and the disposing of your Lights and Shadows. The Painter must also take Care, that his Scene be known by his Piece at first view, by some Ingenious Invention to express the Countrey : Such was that of Nealces a Greek Painter, who having Drawn a Sea-Fight between the Ægyptians and the Persians ; to express, that the Action happened at the Mouth of the Nile, made an Ass drinking by the side of the River, and a Crocodile ready to devour him ; that being the proper Animal of that River.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance