DISPOSITION (n.)

ABTEILUNG (deu.) · AGENCEMENT (fra.) · AUSTEILUNG (deu.) · DISPOSITIE (nld.) · DISPOSITION (fra.) · DISPOSITION (deu.) · DISPOSIZIONE (ita.) · EINRICHTUNG (deu.) · EINTEILUNG (deu.) · GHESCHIKTHEYD (nld.) · MITTEILUNG (deu.) · PLAATSING (nld.) · SAMENVOEGING (nld.) · SCHICKINGH-KONST (nld.) · SCHIKKING (nld.) · SCHIKUNG (deu.) · STELLING (nld.) · VERTEILUNG (deu.) · ZUNEIGUNG (deu.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
ACCORD (fra.) · BIJEENVOEGING (nld.) · DISPOSITIE (nld.) · DISPOSITION (fra.) · DISTRIBUTION (fra.) · ORDONNANTIE (nld.) · SAMENVOEGING (nld.) · SCHICKINGH-KONST (nld.) · SCHIKKING (nld.) · TALENT (fra.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
DISPOSITION (fra.)
PUTTFARKEN, Thomas, The Discovery of Pictorial Composition: Theories of Visual Order in Painting 1400-1800, New Haven - London, Yale University Press, 2000.
TAYLOR, Paul et QUIVIGER, François (éd.), Pictorial Composition From Medieval to Modern Art, Actes du colloque de Londres, London - Torino, Warburg Institute - N. Aragno, 2000.

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LINKED QUOTATIONS

4 sources
5 quotations

Quotation

Of the Parts of a Piece
{Five Principa parts in a Picture.} In a
PICTURE from Nature, there are five Principall parts..
 
1.
Invention or Historicall Argument.
2.
Proportion, Symmetry.
3.
Colour, with Light or Darknesse.
4.
Motion, or Life, and their Action and Passion.
5.
Disposition, or œconomicall placing, or disposing, or ordering the work.
The
four first, are observed in all sorts of Pieces.
 
Disposition only in those Pictures, that have many figures ; not to appear mingle-mangle ; but, in all and every part of the Piece, to observe a decent comlinesse, or grace, in a mutuall accord, of all five.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition

Quotation

Of the disposition of the Parts.
{5. Of Disposition.} A Picture of many
figures, must needs express some Historicall part in it ; Every figure ought to represent therein, by a speechless discourse, the connexion in them. Assigne therefore the principall place, to the principall figures, next to hand ; Other figures, farther off. Finish the Principal figures, whilst your Spirits are fresh. {In order to perfection,} Frame not your Historicall Piece, rude, loose, and scattered, but rather, in an equitable roundness of composition ; to be perceived by each observer ; to be liked of the most, but to be judged, only, by the learned. Neglects in disposition, are soon discovered.
{Soon discovered.} Pourtray in your excellent
Pieces, not only the dainty Lineaments of Beauty, but shadow round about, rude thickers, rocks ; and so it yields more grace to the Picture, and sets it out : this discord (as in musicke) makes a comely concordance ; a disorderly order of counterfeit rudeness, pleaseth : so much grace, doe mean and ordinary things, receive from a good and orderly connexion.
{But altogether excellent.} All these together, make that perspicuous
disposiiton in a Piece of History ; and is the effectuall expression in Posture and Action ; the very Passion of each Figure ; the Soul of the PICTURE ; the Grace and Ayr of the Piece ; or the sweet Consent of all manner of perfections heaped together, in one Picture.
{By example in brief}
And so have we done with an Example of all in One : For
 
                       Invention
allures the mind.
                       Proportion, attracts the Eyes.
                       Colour ;
delights the Fancie.
                      
Lively Motion, stirs up our Soul.
                      
Orderly Disposition, charmes our Senses.
 
{Conclude a rare Picture.} These produce gracefull
Comliness, which makes one fairer then fair ; […].
This Grace is the close of all, effected by a familiar facility in a free and quick spirit of a bold and resolute Artificer ; not to be done by too much double
diligence, or over doing ; a careless shew, hath much of Art.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition

Quotation

Traveller.
           
I must then repeat to you what I told you at our first Meeting [ndr : Dialogue I, « Explaining the Art of Painting »] ; which is, That the Art of Painting has three Parts ; which are, Design, Colouring, and Invention ; and under this third, is that which we call Disposition ; which is properly the Order in which all the Parts of the Story are disposed, so as to produce one effect according to the Design of the Painter ; and that is the first Effect which a good Piece of History is to produce in the Spectator ; that is, if it be a Picture of a joyful Event, that all that is in it be Gay and Smiling, to the very Landskips, Houses, Heavens, Cloaths, &c. And that all the Aptitudes tend to Mirth. The same, if the Story be Sad, or Solemn ; and so for the rest. And a Piece that does not do this at first sight, is most certainly faulty though it never so well Designed, or never so well Coloured ; nay, though there be Learning and Invention in it ; for as a Play that is designed to make me Laugh, is most certainly an ill one if it makes me Cry. So an Historical Piece that doth not produce the Effect it is designed for, cannot pretend to an Excellency, though it be never so finely Painted.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → génie, esprit, imagination

Quotation

I will give a Specimen of what I have been proposing [ndr : dans sa manière de juger une peinture], and the Subject shall be a Portrait of V. Dyck which I have, ‘tis a Half-length of a Countess Dowager of Exeter, as I learn from the Print made of it by Faithorn, and that is almost all one can learn from That concerning the Picture besides the General Attitude, and Disposition of it.
The Dress is Black Velvet, and That appearing almost one large Spot, the Lights not being so managed as to connect it, with the other parts of the Picture ;
The Face, and Linnen at the Neck, and the two Hands, and broad Cuffs at the Wrists being by this means three several Spots of Light, and that near of an equal degree ; and forming almost an Equilateral Triangle, the Base of which is parallel to that of the Picture, the Composition is Defective ; and this occasion’d chiefly from the want of those Lights upon the Black.

term translated by DISPOSITION in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 30-31.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition

Quotation

Apelles himself was so ingenuous to own so great a Proficiency therein, as might seem to add Confirmation, while in the Disposition, or Ordinance, he modestly yielded to Amphion ; in the Measures, or Proportions, he subscribed to Aschepiodorus ; and of Protogenes was wont to say, in all Points he was equal to him, if not above him ; but after all, there was yet one Thing wanting in them all, which was instar omnium, or, however, the Beauty and Life of all, which he only ascribed, and was proud in being the sole Master of himself, viz. his Venus by the Greeks, named ΧΑΡΙΣ a certain peculiar Grace, sometimes called the Air of the Picture, resulting from a due Observation and Concurrence of all the essential Points and Rules requisite in a compleat Picture, accompany’d with an unconstrained and unaffected Facility and Freedom of the Pencil, which together produced such a ravishing Harmony, that made their Works seem to be performed by some divine and unspeakable Way of ART ; and which (as Fr. Junius expresseth it) is not a Perfection of ART, proceeding meerly from ART, but rather a Perfection proceeding from a consummate ART.
HENCE it was that
Apelles admiring the wonderful Pains and Curiosity in each Point in a Picture of Protogenes’s Painting, yet took Occasion from thence to reprehend him for it as a Fault quod nescivit manum tollere de tabula, implying, that a heavy and painful Diligence and Affectation, are destructive of that Comeliness, Beauty and admired Grace, which only a prompt and prosperous Facility proceeding from a found Judgment of ART, can offord unto us.

ordinance

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition