DRAPERY

DRAPERY (n.)

DRAPERIE (nld.) · DRAPERIE (fra.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
DRAPERIE (fra.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
DRAPERIE (fra.)
CAYUELA, Élodie, « DRAPERIE », dans HECK, Michèle-Caroline (éd.), LexArt. Les mots de la peinture (France, Allemagne, Angleterre, Pays-Bas, 1600-1750) [édition anglaise, 2018], Montpellier, Presses Universitaires de la Méditerranée, 2018, p. 173-179.
GORDENKER, Emilie E. S., « The Rhetoric of Dress in Seventeenth-Century Dutch and Flemish Portraiture », The Journal of the Walters Art Gallery, 57, 1999, p. 87-104 [En ligne : http://www.jstor.org/stable/20169144 consulté le 09/04/2018].
HECK, Michèle-Caroline, Théorie et pratique de la peinture : Sandrart et la “Teutsche Academie”, Paris, Éd. de la Maison des sciences de l’homme, 2006.
LINGO, Estelle, « Drapery », dans REINEKE, Anika, RÔHL, Anne, KAPUSTKA, Mateusz et WEDDIGEN, Tristan (éd.), Textile Terms: A Glossary, Berlin, Édition Imorde, 2017, p. 81-84.
MICHEL, Christian et LICHTENSTEIN, Jacqueline (éd.), Conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. Les conférences au temps de Guillet de Saint-Georges, 1682-1699, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 2008, 6 tomes, tome II, 2 vol.
MICHEL, Christian, LICHTENSTEIN, Jacqueline et CASTEX, Jean-Gérald (éd.), Conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. Les conférences, 1712-1746, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 2010, 6 tomes, tome IV, 2 vol.
MICHEL, Christian, LICHTENSTEIN, Jacqueline, CASTEX, Jean-Gérald, CASTOR, Markus A. et GADY, Bénédicte (éd.), Conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. Les conférences au temps de Jules Hardouin-Mansart, 1699-1711, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 2009, 6 tomes, tome III.
MICHEL, Christian, LICHTENSTEIN, Jacqueline, CASTOR, Markus A., MARTIN, Marie-Pauline, PERRIN KHELISSA, Anne et LAZ, Laurens (éd.), Conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. Les conférences, 1752-1792, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 2015, 6 tomes, tome VI, 3 vol.
MICHEL, Christian, LICHTENSTEIN, Jacqueline, COUSSEAU, Henry-Claude et GAEHTGENS, Thomas W. (éd.), Conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. Les conférences au temps d’Henry Testelin, 1648-1681, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 2006, 6 tomes, tome I, 2 vol.
MICHEL, Christian, LICHTENSTEIN, Jacqueline, HAOUADEG, Karim, MARTIN, Marie-Pauline et PERRIN KHELISSA, Anne (éd.), Conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. Les conférences au temps de Charles-Antoine Coypel, 1747-1752, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 2012, 6 tomes, tome V, 2 vol.
REINEKE, Anika, RÔHL, Anne, KAPUSTKA, Mateusz et WEDDIGEN, Tristan, Textile Terms: A Glossary, Berlin, Gebr. Mann Verlag, 2017.
SÉNÉCHAL, Philippe, « Truth in the Fold. Notes on Drapery in the Ancient Style, 1750-1850 », dans SCHWARTZ, Emmanuel (éd.), The Legacy of Homer. Four Centuries of Art from the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, Paris, New Haven, Yale University Press, 2005, p. 43-58.

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

11 sources
26 quotations

Quotation

Drapery (so called of the French word Drap, which is cloath) principally consisteth in the true making and folding your garment, giving to every fold his proper naturall doubling and shadow ; which is great skill, and scarce attained unto by any of our countrey and ordinary Painters : insomuch that if I would make triall of a good workeman ; I would finde him quickly by the folding of a garment, or the shadowing of a gowne, sheete, or such like.
{What Method is to bee observed in drapery}. The method now to be observed in Drapery, is to draw first the outmost or extreme lines of your garment, as you will, full of narrow, and leave wide and spare places, where you thinke you shall have need of folds ; draw your greater folds alwayes first, not letting any line touch, or directly crosse another, for then shall you bring an irrecoverable confusion into your worke : […]. I would herein above all other have you to imitate
Albert Durer, if you can get his peeces, if not Goltzius or some other.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

{5. Of Drapery.} The fifth [ndr : erreur fréquemment commise par le peintre] is of Drapery or attire, in not observing a decorum in garments proper to every severall condition and calling, as not giving to a King his Robes of estate, with their proper furres and linings : to religious persons an habite fitting with humility and contempt of the world ; a notable example of this kind I found in a Gentlemans hall, which was King Salomon sitting in his throne with a deepe lac’d Gentlewomans Ruffe, and a Rebatoe about his necke, upon his head a blacke Velvet cap with a white feather ; the Queene of Sheba kneeling before him in a loose bodied gowne, and a Frenchhood. […].

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

{Drapery what ?} Drapery-garments ; of severall Stuffs, coorse or fine, Silke, Wollen, or Linnen, have their different and naturall folds ; So as in the Lines, of greater, or softer shadows, (well done by an Artist) you may (though in black and white) easily discerne the meaning of the draught ; to be of such a Stuffe, or Cloathing.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

Of Drapery in Limning
{Drapery two waies.} For
Drapery, I find but two waies in Limning ; the one by Italians and French, to work-in their Aparrel, in manner of washing ; […].
The better way is, to lay a good, flat, and full ground, all over, whose
Drapery you mean to make ; […].

École française
École italienne
OLIVER, Isaac

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

Then learn all manner of Drapery, that is, to give garments, and all manner of stuffes, cloth, silk, and linnen their naturall and proper folds; which at the first will seem strange and difficult unto you, but by imitating the choisest prints and pieces of the most judicious Masters, with your own observance, you will very easily attain the skill.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
L’ARTISTE → apprentissage

Quotation

VIII. The fifth praxis is in Drapery, imitating Cloathing, and Artificially setting off the outward Coverings, Habit & Ornaments of the Body, as Cloath, Stuff, Silk and Linnen, their natural and proper folds ; which although it may seem something hard to do, yet by much exercise and imitation of the choisest Prints will become facile and easie.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
L’ARTISTE → apprentissage

Quotation

CHAP. XI. Of Drapery.
I. Draw the out-lines of the Garment lightly, and herein be careful, for the whole grace of the picture lyes there ; then draw the greatest folds first, and stroak those into lesser, and be sure they cross one another.
            II. Suit your garments to the body, and make them bend with the body, according as it stands in or out, streight or crooked, or turns one way or another : the closer the garment fits to the body, the narrower and smaller must the folds be.
            III. All your folds must consist of two lines and no more, which you may turn with the garment at pleasure, shadowing the innermost deeper, the outermost more light ; and if the folds be never so curiously contrived, spare not to shadow them (if they fall inward from the light) with a double or treble shadow, as the occasion requires.
[…]. 

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

CHAP. XX. Of Colours for Drapery.
I.
For Yellow garmets. Take Masticot deepned with brown Oker and red Lead.
II.
For Scarlet. Take vermilion deepned with Sinaper lake, and heightned with touches of Masticot.

[...].

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

CHAP. XXVI. Of Limning Drapery.
            I. A Full and substantial ground being laid all over where you intend the drapery ; as if blew, with Bice smoothly laid, deepen it with Lake and Indico ; [...].

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la peinture

Quotation

Of the Motions of all sorts of Cloth.


The
Motions of Cloth, that as the Folds or Plaits ought to runne out every way like boughs from the Stemme and Body of the Tree : and must be so made that one Plait rise from another, as one bough, or one stream of Water issueth out from another, in such wise, that there be no part of the Cloth wherein there appear not some of these motions ; now these motions would be moderate, gentle and free, without any interruptions, more to be admired for their grace and facility, then for affected pains and industry, and because all sorts of Cloth have their motions, as well as Bodies, it must needs be that they differ between themselves, according to the differences of the clothes themselves.
Wherefore, they must be more light in fine
Cloth, as Sarcenet, Linnen, Cypress, &c. in which the Plaits are small, raised up, trembling, […] ; gross and dul shadows are found in stiff cloths, where the Plaits are few and gross, so that they are capable but of flow motion, […].
Temperate
motions, which are neither too gross, nor too slight, are such as appear in the folds of stuff and other cloths of Fine wool, […]. And hence have Raphael, Michael Angelo, Leonard, Gaudentius, Albertus Durcrus, and other Famous Masters in Drapery, taken the method and way of giving the true motions unto garments, as from the most perfect pattern for their general use in making the mantells of the Saints, Pavilions or Tents, which are made with this kind of Drapery, besides these, there are also other kinds of motions called turnings and crossings, which are proper unto Damasks, Taffataes, Sattins, Cloth of gold &c : in which appeare folds crossing and breaking each other, by the divers Vertue of the Drapery.
Whence the
Venetians have taken their manner of Drapery, who make their folds much different from the said motions of Raphael and the rest, which indeed ought not to be used any where save in counterfeits by the life, where it seems they are not onlye tolerable, but also very requisite ;

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → lumière

Quotation

Of Drapery, or drawing Apparel.


As for
Apparel and Clothing of Personages, you ought to be extreme careful not onely in the Habiting every thing properly belonging to the Degrees and Functions of the Persons represented, but also in giving them their right and proper Colours. As for Example, the Blessed Virgin is universally and by commont consent represented in Purple and Azure ; […]. As for the manner of Drawing of Drapery, I find but two ways in Miniture.

The first way or manner of Working the Drapery.


The first way is that which the
Italian and French do use, working it with the point of a Pencil, and Hatching it ; and other places stipled all over alike, yet so as when it is finished, you may perceive the Parchment appear in several places quite through the Work, which in my Opinion is too slight a way. That manner I do approve of better, for Washing or Drawing any Design with Indian Ink, and indeed ought not to be called Limning but Washing.


The second way or manner of Working a Drapery.


The second way is that which I shall recommend to you as the best and most proper way. First, lay a good full flat Ground all over where you design your
Drapery, of what Colour you would have it. This Groud-colour being laid, you will find it much the easier to work on, upon which you both heighten and deepen, according as your Genius or as the Life shall direct you. […] ; and this was Isaac Olivar’s Way.

apparel

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

Drapery.
Is a General Word for all sorts of Cloathing, with which Figures are Adorned : So we say, Such a Painter disposes well the Foldings of his Drapery.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

Traveller,
            ’
Tis very true, tis one of the most difficult parts of Painting [ndr : le traitement de la draperie]; and the best Rule is, that your Drapery be in large Foldings, Noble and Simple, not repeated too often, but following the Order of the Parts ; and let them be of Stuffs and Silks that are commonly worn, of beautiful Colours, but sweet, and such as do not trench upon the Naked too harshly, and by that means they will be of great Use for the Union of the Whole ; either by reflecting the Light, or giving such a Fund as is wanting for the other Colours to appear better. They serve also to fill up any empty place in the Picture.
            There is also a Judicious Choice to be made of Draperies, according to the Quality of the Persons : Magistrates and Grave People must have Ample and Long Robes ; Countrey People and Souldiers must have Close, Short Draperies ; Young Maids and Women must have them Light, Thin, and Tender. They that follow the Drapery of the Antients in Statues, will always be Stiff, as Raphael was at first, because that they used little Foldings, often repeated ; which do best in Marble or Brass. But Painters who have the Command of Colours, Lights and Shadows, may extend their Draperies, and let them fly as they please. Titian, Paul Veronese, Tintoret, Rubens, and Vandike, have painted Drapery admirably ; and indeed the Lombard School have excell’d in that and Colouring, as the Roman and Florentine
in Design and Nudity.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

Chap. VII, Of Drapery, and Rules to be observed therein.
As in Naked figures you draw the Out-lines first, the like you must do in
Drapery, leaving room within for your greater and lesser folds ; then draw first your greater folds, and then break your greater folds into lesser contained within them : The closer the Garment fits to the body, the smaller and narrower must the folds be. Shadow your folds according to the directions of the last Chapter ; the innermost harder, and the outer more softer. As in Shadowing, so in Drapery, good Copies of Prints instruct best ; yet take these general Rules following.
RULE I.
Continue your great folds throughout your Garment, and break off your shorter at pleasure.
RULE II.
The finer your
Drapery is, the fuller and sharper must your folds be, and the shadows the stronger, but yet sweet.
RULE III.
That part of any Garment the fits close to the body, as the Doublet of a Man, the Breasts of a Woman, and the like, you must not fold at all ; but rather with your sweet shadow represent the part of the body that lies under the Garment, as a Womans Breast, with a sweet round shadow,
&c.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → lumière

Quotation

SECT. I. Of Drapery in Limning.
Having laid a good, fat, and full Ground all over the Drapery you intend to make ; if Blew, then all over with Bise smoothly laid : the deepning must be Lake and Indico, the lightning White, very fine, faint, and fair, and in the extreme light places. What hath been said of this
Blew Drapery, the like is to be understood of all other Colours.
It is rare to see Drapery expressed by lightning of it with fine shell-Gold, with which it must be hatched and washed, what a lustre it gives to well-coloured Drapery, either Crimson, Green, or Blew, but much more if with the Ground it self you mix Gold when you lay it on.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

Chap. VI, Of Garments of several colours, and of their proper Colouring.
The next thing I shall speak of, shall be of
Drapery or Garments, and the true and proper manner of Colouring of them.
And
1. For a Red Garment.
For a light-red Garment, first dead-colour it with Vermilion, and when you would finish it, glaze it over with Lake, and heighten it with White.
For a Scarlet.
[…]
For a Crimson Velvet.
[…]
For a sad Red.
[…]
2.
For Green Garments.
The best Green for holding, is Bise and Pink, heighten it with Masticote, and deepen it with Indico and Pink.
For Green Velvet.
[…].
3.
For Blew Garments.
Take Indico and White, first lay the White in its due places, and then your mean colour, namely Indico and White mixed in their due places, then deepen it with Indico only, […].
4. For
Yellow Garments.
For a Yellow Garment, Masticote, yellow Oker, and Umber ; lay the dead colour of Masticote and White in the lightest places, Oker and White in the mean places, and Umber in the darkest places ; when it is dry glaze it with Pink. […].
5.
For Black Garments.
Let the dead colour be Lamp-black, and some Verdigrease ; when that is dry, go over it with Ivory-black and Verdigrease ; before you go over it the second time, heighten it with White.
6.
For Purple Garments.
Oyl Smalt, tempered with Lake and White-Lead, heighten it with White Lead.
7.
Orange Colour.
Red-Lead and Lake, lay the lightest parts of all with Red-Lead and White, the mean parts with Red-Lead alone, the deeper parts with Lake, if need require heighten it with White.
8.
Hair Colour.
Umber and White for the ground, Umber and Black for the deeper shadows, Umber and
English Oker for mean shadows, for heightning White with a little English Oker.

Garment

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

17. How to Shadow every colour in Garments, or Drapery.
Take this Rule, that every Colour is made to shadow it self, or if you mingle it with White for the light, and so shadow it with the same colour unmingled with White, else take off the thinnest of the colour for the light, and so shadow it with the thickest bottom of the colour ; if you will have your shadow of a darker colour, then the colour it self is to shadow the deepest places. 

Garment

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

In Drapery it must be observ’d that those Folds which come nearest to the Bones, as the Joynts of the Fingers, the Shoulders, the Knees and other Eminences, must be more strongly Touch’d then the other Parts, and by that means the Flesh will appear the more soft and sweet.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
MANIÈRE ET STYLE → le faire et la main

Quotation

What Colour soever we put in Drapery, &c. and there be a Colour by of a near kind we must bring a different one in between, which may loosen the Drapery, otherwise they will Loose themselves in each other.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

Cap. XXIX, The way of Painting a Face.
For a Clear and Beautiful Complection, lay on your Pallat and Temper them by themselves (cleaning your Pallat well after each Colour) these following Colours. [...].
            As for Colour in
Draperys, though some have (absurdly) layd down Certain rules for all Colours, it is a thing impossible to do, by reason the same Colours from divers dispositions of Lights and Reflections, have various Tinktures : nor need the Practisioner be concern’d about it, for when he can once apprehend all the Colours in the Face, he may with great Facility mix all Colours for the more difficult Drapery, even from Nature it self.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait

Quotation

We must adjust the Drapery so on Figures, that they may appear real Vestments, and therefore we must cloath the Lay-man, before we put it in the Action we design.
            The
Folds must be dispos’d in such manner, that they may make the great parts, in which the Nudity may appear, Free ; the little Folds being plac’d about the Joynts ; and taking great care that upon the Relief and Surface of Members, we do not strain or hurt them, but that the motions may seem disingag’d. We must also raise up the stuff, letting it fall lightly, that the Air sustaining the Folds, may make them fall more neat and soft.
            We must take care to distinguish
Draperys ; Taffatys and thin Silks must be full of Breaks and Flickerings ; [...].

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

The Habits are not those of the Age in which the Scene of the Fable is laid, These must have been Gothick, and Disagreeable, it being at the latter end of the 11th, or the beginning of the 12th Century [ndr : il s’agit ici du Tancrède et Herminie, réalisé par Poussin]. Erminia is clad in Blue, admirably folded, and in a great Style, something like that of Giulio, but more upon the Antique, or, Raffaelle ; one of her feet is seen which is very Gentile, and Artfully dispos’d ; her Sandal is very particular, for ‘tis a little rais’d under the Heel as our Children’s Shoes. Vafrino has a Helmet on with a large, bent Plate of Gold instead, and something with the turn of a Feather. We don’t remember any thing like it in the Antique ; There is no such thing in the Column of Trajan, nor that of Antonine (as ‘tis usually call’d tho’ ‘tis now known to be of M. Aurelius) nor (I believe) in the Works of Raffaelle, Guilio, or Polydore when they have imitated the Ancients, tho’ These, especially the two former have taken like Liberties, and departing from the Simplicity of their Great Masters have in these Instances given a little into the Gothick tast : This is probably Poussin’s own Invention, and has such an effect that I cannot imagine any thing else could possibly have been so well. The Figure is in Armour, not with Labells, but Scarlet Drapery where those usually are which also is Antique.

habit

term translated by DRAPERIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., P. 45-46.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

The Robes, and other Habits of the Figures ; their Attendants, and Ensigns of Authority, or Dignity, as Crowns, Maces, &c. help to express their Distinct Characters ; and commonly even their Place in the Composition. The Principal Persons, and Actors must not be put in a Corner, or towards the Extremities of the Picture, unless the Necessity of the Subject requires it. A Christ, or an Apostle must not be dress’d like an Artificer, or a Fisherman ; a Man of Quality must be distinguish’d from one of the Lower Orders of Men, as a Well-bred Man always is in Life from a Peasant. And so of the rest.
Every body knows the common, or ordinary Distinctions by Dress ; but there is one Instance of a particular kind which I will mention, as being likely to give useful Hints to this purpose, and moreover very curious. In the Carton of Giving the Keys to S.
Peter, Our Saviour is wrapt only in on large piece of white Drapery, his Left Arm, and Breast, are part of his Legs naked ; which undoubtedly was done to denote him Now to appear in his Resurrection-Body, and not as before his Crucifixion, when This Dress would have been altogether improper. And this is the more remarkable, as having been done upon second Thoughts, and after the Picture was perhaps finish’d, which I know by having a Drawing of this Carton, very old, and probably made in Rafaëlle’s time, tho’ not of his hand, where the Christ is fully Clad ; he has the very same large Drapery, but one under it that covers his Breast, Arm, and Legs down to the Feet. Every thing else is pretty near the same with the Carton.

dress · robe · habit

term translated by DRAPERIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 72-73.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

This important piece of Drapery preserves the Mass of Light upon that Figure [ndr : il s’agit de la draperie de saint Paul dans le carton de Saint Paul prêchant à Athènes par Raphaël], but varies it, and gives it an agreeable Form, whereas without it the whole Figure would have been Heavy, and Disagreeable ; but there was no danger of that in Rafaëlle. There is another piece of Drapery in the Carton of Giving the Keys, which is very Judiciously flung in ; The three outmost Figures at the End of the Picture, (the contrary to that where our Lord is) made a Mass of Light of a Shape not very pleasing, till that knowing Painter struck in a part of the Garment of the last Apostle in the Group as folded under his Arm, this breaks the streight Line, and gives a more grateful Form to the whole Mass ;

term translated by DRAPERIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 109-110.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

The Draperies must have broad Masses of Light, and Shadow, and noble large Folds to give a Greatness ; and These artfully subdivised, add Grace. As in that Admirable Figure of S. Paul Preaching, of which I have already spoken, the Drapery would have had a Greatness if that whole Broad Light had been kept, and that part which is flung over his Shoulder, and hangs down his Back had been omitted ; but That adds also a Grace.

term translated by DRAPERIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 155-156.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → grandeur et noblesse

Quotation

He [ndr : Cimon de Cleonen] was the First bold and daring Man that took Courage to adventure into the Ocean of this ART [ndr : la peinture], that made many remarkable Discoveries of the incognita thereof, and left the Way open and fairly obvious to all his Followers ; for he enriched it with such a Variety of Embellishments, that in him first it began to have some Form of itself, and arrive to a competent Perfection ; what in their Paintings was Dead and Stiff, he gave Motion and Life to by his Skill, that he attained to in the Art of Fore-shortenings, turning the Faces of his Figures several Ways, either looking Upward, Backward, or Downward ; and by his Kowledge in the various Motions of the Limbs and Joints, and Muscling of the whole Body, which he was the first that attained and taught, what before either they knew nothing at all of Drapery, or, however, but some very unpleasant, flat and startch’d Way, he rectify’d, and, as Pliny tells us, taught a true and natural sort of Drapery, and the proper Plaiting and Foldings of all sorts of Garments.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai