EVELYN, John, Sculptura: Or, The History, And Art of Chalcography And Engraving in Copper. With an ample enumeration of the most renowned Masters, and their Works. To which is annexed A new manner of Engraving, or Mezzo Tinto, communicated by his Highness Prince Rupert, to the Authour of this Treatise, London, G. Beedle, 1662.

Library of Congress Washington NE1760.E9 1662 Frontispice Images hors-texte 81 quotations 54 terms
Cet ouvrage se présente comme une histoire de la gravure. Remontant jusqu’aux origines supposées de ce medium, John Evelyn puise notamment ici dans l’histoire biblique et antique. Cette manière de penser l’estampe en lui cherchant des racines pluriséculaires situe techniquement l’image imprimée en continuité de la sculpture (chapitre 1).
Dans le chapitre cinq, le plus consistant du point de vue de la théorie de l’art, Evelyn aborde la question des rapports entre gravure et dessin (« drawing » ou « design »). Lecteur d’Abraham Bosse, il y reprend par ailleurs plusieurs passages de ses traités, en particulier de son Moyen universel de pratiquer la perspective sur les tableaux ou surfaces irrégulières au sujet du traitement des effets reliefs au moyen de hachures [Il s’agit de la reprise d’un passage de BOSSE Abraham, Moyen universel de pratiquer la perspective sur les tableaux ou surfaces irrégulières, Paris, A. Bosse, 1653. Voir en particulier p. 35-38 et p.75 ; avec une planche d’illustration qui est une copie en contrepartie d’après la planche 31 de ce même traité d’Abraham Bosse], ou encore de ses Sentiments sur la distinction des diverses manières de peinture, dessin et gravure, et des originaux d’avec leurs copies avec un passage qui aborde la question des copies gravées [Il s’agit de la reprise d’un passage de BOSSE Abraham, Sentiments sur la distinction des diverses manières de peinture, dessin et gravure, et des originaux d’avec leurs copies, Paris, Abraham Bosse, 1649, CHAP. VII. SUR LA DISTINCTION des Diverses manieres des Stampes ou Tailles-Douces, tant des Originales que des Copies, p. 81-82]. Pour terminer, ce chapitre aborde également le rôle didactique des estampes.
Le bref chapitre qui clôt ce traité évoque la gravure en manière noire (chapitre 6). La description de cette nouvelle technique de gravure est ici délibérément imprécise et allusive. Elle y est présentée comme une invention du prince Rupert et est assimilée à la peinture.
John Evelyn comptait semble-t-il initialement joindre à ce texte une traduction en anglais du Traité des manières de graver (éd. 1645) d’Abraham Bosse ; il aurait toutefois abandonné cette idée, la traduction de William Faithorne ayant paru la même année (éd. 1662) [Voir An advertisement (avertissement concernant le Traité des manieres de graver en taille douce sur l'airain d’Abraham Bosse), n. p].

Flora Herbert
in-8 english

Dedication
Robert Boyle

Structure
Table of the titles, of the Chapters and Contents at n.p.
Authors and Books at n. p.
Dédicace(s) at n.p.
Account at n.p.
Advertissement at n.p.

EVELYN, John, Sculptura; Or, The History and Art of Chalcography, And Engraving in Copper : with An ample Enumeration of the most renowned Masters and their Works. To which is annexed, A New Manner of Engraving, or Mezzotinto, Communicated by His Highness Prince Rupert to the Author of this Treatise, John Evelyn, Esq; The Second Edition. Containing some Corrections and Additions taken from the Margin of the Author'S printed Copy ; an Etching of his Head, by Mr. Worlidge ; an exact Copy of the Mezzotinto done by Prince Rupert, by Mr. Houston ; a Translation of all the Greek and Latin Passages ; and Memoirs of the Author's Life, London, J. Payne, 1755.

EVELYN, John, Sculptura; Or, the History and Art of Chalcography, and Engraving in Copper : With An ample Enumeration of the most renowned Masters and their Works. To which is annexed, A New Manner of Engraving, or Mezzotinto, Communicated by His Highness Prince Rupert to the Author of this Treatise, John Evelyn, Esq; The Third Edition. Containing some Corrections and Additions taken from the Margin of the Author'S printed Copy ; an Etching of his Head, by Mr. Worlidge ; an exact Copy of the Mezzotinto, done by Prince Rupert, by Mr. Houston ; a Translation of all the Greek and Latin Passages ; and Memoirs of the Author's Life, London, T. Jefferys, 1759.

EVELYN, John, Sculptura; Or, the History and Art of Chalcography, And Engraving in Copper : with An ample Enumeration of the most renowned Masters and their Works. To which is annexed, A New Manner of Engraving, or Mezzotinto, Communicated by His Highness Prince Rupert to the Author of this Treatise, John Evelyn, Esq; The Second Edition. Containing some Corrections and Additions taken from the Margin of the Author'S printed Copy ; an Etching of his Head, by Mr. Worlidge ; an exact Copy of the Mezzotinto, done by Prince Rupert, by Mr. Houston ; a Translation of all the Greek and Latin Passages ; and Memoirs of the Author's Life, London, J. Murray, 1769.

EVELYN, John, Evelyn's Sculptura. With the unpublished Second Part, BELL, Charles Francis (éd.), Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1906.

GRIFFITHS, Antony, « John Evelyn and the Print », dans HARRIS, Frances et HUNTER, Michael (éd.), John Evelyn and his Milieu, London, The British Library, 2003, p. 95-113.

FILTERS

QUOTATIONS

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

Those who have most refined, and criticiz’d upon Technical notions, seem to distinguish what we commonly name Sculpture into three several Arts ; and, to attribute specifical differences to them all ; For there is, besides Sculptura (as it relates to Chalcography) Scalptura (so Diomedes) and Cælatura ; both which, according to Quintilian, differ from the first ratione materiæ.

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure

(...) in the time of Raphael Urbine flourished the renouned Marco Antonio, who graved after those incomparable pieces of that famous Painter, to whom he was so dear, that the honour he has done him to posterity will appear, so long as that School of Raphael remains in the Popes Chamber at the Vatican, or any memorial of it lasts ; though to speak truth, even of this rare Graver, the Pieces which he hath published seem to be more estimable yet for the choice and imitation, then for any perfection of the Burine ; as forming most of his figures and touches of too equal force, and by no means well observing the distances, according to the rules of Perspective, that tendernesse, and as the Italians terme it, Morbidezza, in the hatching, which is absolutely requisite to render a piece accomplish’d and without reproch.

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

Ugo de Carpi did things in stamp, which appear’d as tender as any Drawings, and in a new way of Charo Scuro, or Mezzo Tinto by the help of two plates, exactly conter-calked ; one serving for the shadow ; the other for the heightning ; (...)

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

As the Rules of Mesure and Proportion have an universal influence upon all the Action of our lives ; it was a memorable, and noble saying of a great Person of our Nation, discoursing to us once concerning the dignity of Painting, and the arts which attend it : That one who could not Designe a little, would never make an honest man {Thomas Earl of Arundel L. Marsh. of England} : How that observation succeeds in the general, we have not made it much our observation ; but this we are bold to pronounce. That he shall never attain to the excellency of a good Chalcographer, who is not more then ordinarily skill’d in the faculty and art of Drawing ; a thing so highly necessary, that Donatellus was wont to tell his Disciples (discoursing sometimes concerning the accomplishment of this Art) that to deliver it in a single word, he would say, DESIGNE ; because it was the very Basis and Foundation, not only of this, but even of all those free and noble Sciences of Fortification, Architecture, Perspective, and whatsoever also pretended to any affinity with the Mathematicks, as really leading the Van, and perfective of them all.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure

But to treat Methodically of this, or as we have already enlarged in the History and Progresse of Chalcography, and the surviving labours of the most renowned Masters, would require no lesse time and pains : It were indeed a noble, curious, and useful work, but almost impossible to accomplish ; because the Original Drawings of the great Masters, being dispersed amongst the hands of the greatest Princes, and men of Science only, are preserved with jealousie, and esteem’d, as so many Jewels of greater value, then those of Pearles and Diamonds : For some of them being the very last workes, though but imperfect draughts of so Excellent Artists ; they have for the most part been in greater esteem, then even those of larger bulke and more finished ; as Pliny instances in the Iris of Aristides, the Medea of Timomachus, and some others ; because (as he there speaks) such touches did even expresse the very thoughts and prime conception of the Workman, as well as the Lineaments which he presents us ; and that there is a certain compassion in our Natures, which indears them to us, so as we cannot but love, and desire the hands which perished in the midst of such famous pieces  […]

Conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → jugement
L’ARTISTE → qualités

Conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → jugement
L’ARTISTE → qualités

These difficulties therefore consider’d, it will not be required of us in this Chapter, which pretend to celebrate and promote the Art of Drawing, and Design, only as it has relation, and is an absolute requisite to that of Chalcography, and to prescribe some directions and encouragements, which may prepare and fit the hand with a competent address therein.
Whether
Design, and Drawing, were the production of Chance or Excogitation, we determine not ; certain it is that practise and experience was its Nurse and perficient ; by some thus defin’d to be A visible expression of the Hand resembling the conception of the mind : By which Definition there are who distinguish it from Drawing both as its Original, and Formality ; For Design (say they) is of things not yet appearing ; being but the pictures of Ideas only ; whereas Drawing, relates more to Copies, and things already extant 

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

The first and principal manner of Drawing is that with pen ; the next with Crayon, whither black, white, red or any of the intermedial colours, upon paper either white or colour’d : We will not say much concerning washing with the pencil, or rubbing in the shades with Pastills and dry Compositions ; because it is not till our Disciple be a consummat Artist, that he can be edified with designes of this nature, and, after which, they are excellent use and effect. [...]

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

The pen is therefore both the first, and best instructive, and has then (as all the other kinds) attain’d its desired end, when it so deceives the eye by the Magic, and innocent Witch-craft of lights and shades, that elevated, and solid bodies in Nature, may seem swelling, and to be embossed in Plano, by Art.
To arrive at this, you must first draw the exact lineaments, and proportion of the subject you would expresse in
profile, Contours and single lines only ; and afterwards, by more frequent, and tender hatches in the lighter places, strong, bold, or cross in the deeper.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la lumière
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

By Hatching is understood a continual Series, or sucession of many lines, shorter, or longer ; close, or more separate ; oblique, or direct, according as the work requires, to render it more, or lesse inlightned ; and is attain’d by practise with a swift, even and dextrous hand ; though sometimes also, by the help of the rule and compass ;

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure

After these, let our Learner design the several members of bodies a part, and then united, with intire Figures and Stories, till he be able to compose something of his own, which may support the examination of qualified Judges. But the προχαραγμα or first draughts of these ; would not be with too great curiosity, and the several minutiae that appear in many Coppies ; but with a certain free and judicious negligence, rather aiming at the Original, than painting of your self with overmuch exactnesse : for nocere saepe nimiam diligentiam, was an old observation ; and therefore the antient Painters (sayes Philostratus) more esteem’d a certain true and liberal Draught, than the neatness of the Figure, as he expresses it in Amphiaraus’s Horse, sweating after the conflict ; since Drawings and Designes are not to be like Polycletus’s Canon, which took its several parts, from as many perfect bodies, by a studied, and most accurate Symmetrie : it shall suffice that the prime conceptions of our Artist be perform’d with less contraint ; 

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

…] a coal or pencil of black-lead will serve the turn, reserving the stronger, and deeper touches for a second pass of the hand over your work ; and last of all, penning the Contours, and out lines with a more even and acute touch, neatly finishing the hatches with a resolute, constant and slowing hand ; especially, as it approaches to the fainter shadowes, terminating them in lost and misty extreams, and thwarted (if you will counter-hatch) at equal, and uniform intervals (but not till the first be dry) or, if with single stroaks (which to us renders the most natural, and agreeable effects) with full, deep hatches, and their due diminishings.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

But it would haply be objected, that these accurate Designes of the pen, were never esteemed among the nobler parts of Drawing, as for the most part appearing to finnicall, stiff and contrain’d : To this, we reply ; that the remark is not impertinent, as commonly we find by experience : But it has not proceeded from the least defect in the Instrument, but from that of the Artist, whose aptitude is not yet arriv’d to that perfection which is requisite, and does infaillibly confirme, and dispose the hand to whatever it addresses ; affording so great a delight and satisfaction to some excellent Workmen, as that they never derir’d to advance further, then this Triumph of the pen, which has celebrated their names, and equaliz’d their renown with that of the most famous Painters  (...)

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Neither shall it then be requisite to continue that exactness, since all Drawing is but as an Hand-maid and Attendant to what you would either Grave or paint.
But by this perfection and dexterity at first, did even those renouned Masters,
Julio, Parmegian, and sometimes Polydor, himself (not to insist on Rubens and Vandyke) proceed, whose Drawings in this kind, when first they made their studies in Italy, were exceedingly curious, and finished ; though in all their more recent, and matured Designes, rather judicious then exact, because of that time which such minute finishing did usually take up ; and, that when all is done, it is still but a Drawing, which indeed conduces to the making of profitable things, but is it self none.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
L’ARTISTE → qualités
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Yet so highly necessary is this of Drawing to all who pretend to these noble, and refined Arts ; that for the securing of this Foundation, and the promotion and encouragement of it, the greatest Princes of Europe, have erected Academies, furnished with all conveniencies, for the exercice, and improvement of the Virtuosi : Such illustrious and noble Genius’s were Cosimo di Medices, Francis the First, Carlo Borromeo, and others, who built, or appointed for them, Stately Appartiments even in their own Palaces, and under the same Roofe : procuring Models, and endowing them with Charters, Enfranchisements, and ample Honoraries ; by which they attracted to their Courts, and Countries most of the refin’d, and extraordinary spirits in all the Arts and Sciences that were then celebrated throughout the World.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → apprentissage

And here we should have put a period to this Essay, and the present chapter, as having abundantly vindicated the necessity and worthiness of Designe and Drawing, as it is praevious, and introductory to the Art of Chalcography ; had not one curiosity more prevented us ; which because it so much concernes the conducting of Hatches and stroaks, whether with pen, point, or Graver ; pretending (at least very ingeniously hinting) to a method, how by a constant, and regular certitude, one may express to the eye, the Sensation of the Relievo, or extancie of objects, be it by one, or more hatches, cross and counter, we think not impertinent here to recite, as briefly as the demonstration will permit.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

The principal end of a Graver that would coppy a Design, or a piece compos’d of one, or more Objects, is, to render it correct both in relation to the Draught, Contours and other particularities, as to the Lights and shades on the Front, flying or turning, in bold, or faint touches ; so as may best express the Reliefe ; in which Gravers have hitherto, for the most part, rather imitated one another, then improved, or refined upon Nature ; some with more, some withe fewer stroaks : having never yet found out a certain and uniforme guide to follow in this work ; so as to carry their stroaks with assurance, as knowing where they are to determine, without manifestly offending the due rules of perspective.

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
L’ARTISTE → qualités

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
L’ARTISTE → qualités

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
L’ARTISTE → qualités
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

If in truth Naked, and other polite Bodies were so formed, as that we might detect the course, and inclination of the Threads, Fibers, and Grain, so as we perceive it in Stuffs, Cloth, Linnen and other Draperies ; nothing would appear more facile ; for let them assume what ply they will, it does not all concern the tissue, Tenor or range of the Threads and Wales (as they call them) which is easily imitated, both as to their inclinations, and distances from the point of sight.
But since we are much at a loss, and can perceive no such direction or clue in Nudities, and other smooth surfaces, it were haply worth the while, to find out some expedient which should assist the imagination in this affair, and that might encounter the difficulty upon other
terse and even objects, by forming such stroaks, and directors upon them in our Imagination ; observing, that there are some parts in them commonly to be distinguished from the Mass in gross ; for example, the hairs in men, eyes, teeth, nails, &c. that as one would conceive such lines, or hatches on those Masses, others may likewise be as well fanci’d upon those lesser, and more delicate members 

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

From these instances now, it will not be difficult how to apply the same upon all the sorts of bodies representable by Graving, and to comprehend in one’s imagination, the particles, as we may so call them ; Only there is this particular to be observed, that the projecture of the threads will not appear alike perspicuous in the deep, and shady parts of Relievos, as upon the illuminated, being lost in the dark : But this is easily supplyed by the imagination, or by holding a loose thread parallel to the shaded, neer to the body of the Figure ; by which the course of the rest may be well conceived. And this may serve to give great light to him that shall either grave in Copper, or draw with the pen, for the Symmetrically conducting hatches, determinatively, and with certitude, by thus imagining them to be Geometrically marked upon the Relievo, or embossement of the Natural, whereever he encounter it, and after his Plate, or Draught in perspective.
And indeed, that which is chiefly considerable and ingenious in this, is,
that of their Perspective ; since the shades of the lines (in the foremention’d example which were upon the parts more, or lesse turn’d, appear to our eye accordingly, with more or less force, which renders clear a different effect, as to the swelling and extancies of the parts, then we find it in works where this method has not been observed ; so as truly, this may seem to be the most certain expedient of expressing by hatches, the Relievo of objects, whether with the Pen, or Burine. And this is the sence of a much larger discourse, which Monsieur du Bosse has proposed, treating of the practise of Perspective upon irregular Surfaces, and we have thought fit to insert into this Chapter ; not only because it is new and pretty ; but, for that (to us) it appears to be of good use, and as may be seen in some of the late heads graven by the incomparable Nanteuille, who had been the sole occasion of this ingenious consideration, about the time of our last being at Paris.

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique du dessin

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique du dessin

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

But if this (like the diligence of Mechopanes, which Pliny affirmes, none was able to understand but an Artist only) seem to be a disquisition more refin’d then useful ; for that few of our Gravers work off from the Round, upon which alone the observation is practicable ; yet shall it be necessary to admonish, that shadowes over dark, too deep and suddain, are not commendable in these works, as seldom so appearing in the life ; and therefore hatchings expres’d by single stroaks, are ever the most graceful and natural ; though of greater difficulty to execute ; especialy, being any wayes oblique ; because they will require to be made broader, and fuller in the middle, then either at their entrance, or exit ; an addresse much more easie with the Burin, and the Pen, then with the point, Though Monsieur Bosse’s invention of the Eschoppe, does render the making of this Sulcus, much more facile :

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

But to attain this Masterly, and with assurance of hand, our Workmen may do well to imitate the Gravings of the Sadelers, Villamena, Sauanneburg, Gaultier ; but especially Claudis Mellan, Natalis, Poisly, Nanteuill, Cornelius Blomart, H. Goultzius : And for the Etchers in Aqua Fortis, Callot, and Du Bosse in some of their last cuts, especially ;

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → apprentissage
L’ARTISTE → qualités

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → apprentissage
L’ARTISTE → qualités

Thus Aglaphontes us’d but one Colour, no more did Nitia the Athenian Painter ; and it was this Relievo also for which the famous Zeuxis became so renound’d : not to insist on Heredices the Corinthian, and Thelophanes the Sicyonian, who were both of them but Monochromists ; and, ‘till Cleophanes came amongst them, no dissemblers, as owning no other Colours but those eminent Contraries ; that is, the lights and the shades, in the true managing whereof, so many wonders are to be produc’d by this Art, and even a certain splendor, and beauty in the touches of the Burin, so as the very Union and colouring it self may be conceiv’d without any force upon the imagination, as we have before observed in these excellent Gravings of Natalis, Rouslet, and Poisly, after Bourdon ; and in what Greuter, Blomart, and some others have done after Monsieur Poussin, Guido Rhene, Cortoon, &c.

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure

But here by the way, let no man think we mean by this Coloree (as they term it) in Drawing and Graving, such a position of the Hatches as the Chevalier Wolson has invented, and Pietro Santo the Jesuite {Theatre d’honeur. Tessera Gentil.} has follow’d, to distinguish their Blazons by : But a certain admirable effect, emerging from the former union of Lights, and shadowes ; such as the Antient would expresse by Tonus, or the Pythagoreans in their Proportions, and imitated in this Art, where the shades of the Hatches intend, and remit to the best resemblance of painting, the Commissures of the light and dark parts, imperceptably united, or at least so sweetly conducted, as tat the alteration could no more certainly be defin’d, then the Semitons, or Harmoge in musick ; which though indeed differing ; yet it is so gentle, and so agreeable, as even ravishes our senses, by a secret kind of charme not to be expressed in words, or discerned by the ignorant. 

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → comparaison entre les arts

And this it is, which has rendred it so difficult to coppy after Designes and Painting ; and to give the true heightnings, where there are no hatchings to express them ; unless he, that Copies, Design perfectly himself, and possess more then the ordinary talent and judgement of Gravers, or can himself manage the Pencil. But to return to Prints again, we are to understand, that what the Artists do many times call excellent, does not alwayes signifie to the advantage of the Graver ; but more frequently, the Design, consisting in the lineaments, proportion and ordonnance, if these be well, and masterly perform’d, and for which we have so recommended the practise of this Art to our English Painters in chap. IV. Though, to speak of an accomplish’d piece indeed, it is the result of integrall causes only, and where they universally encounter.

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → comparaison entre les arts
L’ARTISTE → qualités

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → comparaison entre les arts

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la gravure
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → comparaison entre les arts
L’ARTISTE → qualités

We do farher add, that for this reason, copies are in Prints much more easily detected, then in paintings ; and by consequence, more facile also to imitate, as using all one kind of Instrument, and fewer ways of expression : But if there be a difficulty in it, thosewhich are Etched in A. F. [n.d.r. : Aqua Forti ] make it most conspicuous ; both because the nature of the plates, and quality of the Waters, and their operations, may sometimes fall out to be so very unlike : But, to discern an Original print from a Copy print (not to speak of such plates as have been retouch’d, and therefore of little value) is a knack very easily attain’d ; because’tis almost impossible to imitate every hatch, and to make the stroaks of exact and equal dimensions, where every the least defect, or flaw in the Copper it self, is sufficient to detect and betray the Imposture, as in that little Descent from the cross of Hanibal Carraccio (already mention’d) is perspicuous, and which it were absolutely impossible to conterfeit. In the mean time, such as are profound, and well knowing, do establish their Judgments upon other particulars of the Art, and the very handling it self. 

CARRACHE, Annibale, Descente de croix (gravure d'après)

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → statut de l'oeuvre : copie, original...

CARRACHE, Annibale, Descente de croix (gravure d'après)

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → statut de l'oeuvre : copie, original...
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure

CARRACHE, Annibale, Descente de croix (gravure d'après)

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la gravure
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → statut de l'oeuvre : copie, original...

Lastly, that A.F. [n.d.r. : Aqua Forti ] gives a tenderness to Landskips, Trees and Buildings superiour to that of the Burine (though that exceed infinitely in Figures) may be seen in that of Israels view of the Louvre before recited, and in some other works where there is an industrious and studied mixture ; as in that second manner of Vosterman’s which did so much please Rubens and Vandycke, even in the Portraicts which that excellent Graver published after those great mens paintings.

SILVESTRE, Israël, Vue du Louvre