EFFECT

EFFECT (n.)

EFFEKT (deu.) · EFFET (fra.) · EFFETO (ita.) · GENEHMHALTUNG (deu.) · SCHEIN (deu.) · WIRKUNG (deu.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
BEL-EFFET (fra.) · EFFET (fra.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
/ · EFFET (fra.)
HECK, Michèle-Caroline, « EFFET », dans HECK, Michèle-Caroline (éd.), LexArt. Les mots de la peinture (France, Allemagne, Angleterre, Pays-Bas, 1600-1750) [édition anglaise, 2018], Montpellier, Presses Universitaires de la Méditerranée, 2018, p. 189-195.
NATIVEL, Colette, « La théorie de la composition dans le “De Pictura Veterum” de Franciscus Junius  : une transition entre Alberti et l’Académie », dans TAYLOR, Paul et QUIVIGER, François (éd.), Pictorial Composition from Medieval to Modern Art, Actes du colloque de Londres, London, Warburg Institute, 2000, p. 117-130.
PUTTFARKEN, Thomas, Roger de Piles’ Theory of Art, New Haven - London, Yale University Press, 1985.
PUTTFARKEN, Thomas, The Discovery of Pictorial Composition: Theories of Visual Order in Painting 1400-1800, New Haven - London, Yale University Press, 2000.
PUTTFARKEN, Thomas, « Composition, Disposition and Ordonnance in French Seventeenth-Century Writings on Art », dans TAYLOR, Paul et QUIVIGER, François (éd.), Pictorial Composition from Medieval to Modern Art , Actes du colloque de Londres, Torino, Nino Aragno Editore, 2000, p. 131-145.
TAYLOR, Paul, « Composition in Seventeenth-Century Dutch Art Theory », dans TAYLOR, Paul et QUIVIGER, François (éd.), Pictorial Composition From Medieval to Modern Art, Actes du colloque de Londres, London - Torino, Warburg Institute - N. Aragno, 2000, p. 146-171.
VAN ECK, Caroline, Classical Rhetoric and the Visual Arts in Early Modern Europe, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2007.

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

5 sources
8 quotations

Quotation

Now the Painter expresseth two things with his colour : First the colour of the thing, whether it be artificial or natural, which he doth with the like colour, as the colour of a blew garment with artificial blew, or the green colour of a Tree with the like green : Secondly he expresseth the light of the Sun, or any other bright Body apt to lighten or manifest the colours, and because colour cannot be seen without light, being nothing else (as the Philosophers teach) but the extream Superficies of a dark untransparent Body lightned, I hold it expedient for him that will prove exquisite in the use thereof, to be most diligent in searching out the effects of light, when it enlightneth colour, which who so doth seriously consider, shall express all those effects with an admirable Grace ; […].
Now when the
Painter would imitate this blew thus lightned, he shall take his artificial blew colour, counterfeiting therewith the blew of the garment, but when he would express the light, wherewith the blew seems clearer, he must mix so much white with his blew, as he findeth light in that part of the garment, where the light striketh with greater force, considering afterwards the other part of the garment, where there is not so much light, and shall mingle less white with his blew proportionably, and so shall he proceed with the like discretion in all the other parts : and where the light falleth not so vehemently, but only by reflexion there he shall mix so much shadow with his blew, as shall seem sufficient to represent that light, loosing it self as it were by degrees, provided alwayes, that where the light is less darkned, there he place his shadow,
In which judicious expressing of the effects of light together with the
colours, Raphael Urbine, Leonard Vincent, Antonius de Coreggio and Titian were most admirable, handling them with so great discretion and judgement, that their Pictures seemed rather natural, then artificial ; the reason whereof the vulgar Eye cannot conceive, notwithstanding these excellent Masters expressed their chiefest art therein, considering with themselves that the light falling upon the flesh caused these and such like effects, in which kind Titan excelled the rest, who as well to shew his great Skill therein, as to merit commendation, used to cozen and deceive Mens Eyes, […].

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la lumière

Quotation

Traveller.
           
I must then repeat to you what I told you at our first Meeting [ndr : Dialogue I, « Explaining the Art of Painting »] ; which is, That the Art of Painting has three Parts ; which are, Design, Colouring, and Invention ; and under this third, is that which we call Disposition ; which is properly the Order in which all the Parts of the Story are disposed, so as to produce one effect according to the Design of the Painter ; and that is the first Effect which a good Piece of History is to produce in the Spectator ; that is, if it be a Picture of a joyful Event, that all that is in it be Gay and Smiling, to the very Landskips, Houses, Heavens, Cloaths, &c. And that all the Aptitudes tend to Mirth. The same, if the Story be Sad, or Solemn ; and so for the rest. And a Piece that does not do this at first sight, is most certainly faulty though it never so well Designed, or never so well Coloured ; nay, though there be Learning and Invention in it ; for as a Play that is designed to make me Laugh, is most certainly an ill one if it makes me Cry. So an Historical Piece that doth not produce the Effect it is designed for, cannot pretend to an Excellency, though it be never so finely Painted.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Quotation

Chap. XXI, The Effects of Light.

The Light falling on the Flesh of Young Women and Children causeth a Pleasant, Tender Shaddow without much Reflection ; but when on old hard and stiff Flesh, it remaineth more Harsh, the shaddows being harder : [...].
           
In Drapery it must be observ’d that those Folds which come nearest to the Bones, as the Joynts of the Fingers, the Shoulders, the Knees and other Eminences, must be more strongly Touch’d then the other Parts, and by that means the Flesh will appear the more soft and sweet.
            On
Diamonds and other Pretious Stones the Light falls more quick and strong according to the Condensation of their Bodys, next upon polisht Mettals as Silver, Armour, &c [...].

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la lumière

Quotation

So in Painting the Sublimity of the Thought, or Expression may be consistent with bad Colouring, or Drawing, and these may help to produce that fine effect ; If they do not, That will make Them Overlook’d, or even Prejudice us in their favour ; However ‘tis not those Defects, but what is Excellent that is Sublime.

term translated by / in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 17.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → merveilleux et sublime

Quotation

The Tout-ensemble of the Colouring [ndr : dans le portrait de la comtesse Dowager of Exeter, par Van Dyck] is Extreamly Beautiful ; ‘tis Solemn, but Warm, Mellow, Clean, and Natural ; the Flesh, which is exquisitely good, especially the Face, the Black Habit, the Linnen and Cushion, the Chair of the Crimson Velvet, and the Gold Flower’d Curtain mixt with a little Crimson have an Admirable effect, and would be Perfect were there a Middle Tinct amongst the Black.

term translated by EFFET in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 32.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

What is Beautiful, and Excellent is naturally adapted to Please ; but all Beauties, and Excellencies are not naturally Seen. Most Gentlemen see Pictures, and Drawings as the Generality of People see the Heavens in a Clear, Starry Night, they perceive a sort of Beauty there, but such a one as produces no great Pleasure in the Mind : But when one considers the Heavenly Bodies as other Worlds, and that there are an Infinite Number of these in the Empire of God, Immensity ; and Worlds which our Eyes assisted by the best Glasses can never reach, and so far removed from the most distant of what we see (which yet are so far removed from us that when we consider it our Minds are fill’d with Astonishment) that These Visible ones are as it were our Neighbours, as the Continent of France is to Great Britain ; When one considers farther, That as there Inhabitants on this Continent tho’ we see them not when we see That, ‘tis altogether unreasonable to Imagine that those Innumerable Words are Uninhabited, and Desart ; there must be Beings There, Some perhaps More, Others Less Noble, and Excellent than Men : When one Thus views this Vast Prospect, the Mind is Otherwise affected than Before, and feels a Delight which Common Notions never can administer. So those who at Present cannot comprehend there can be such Pleasure in a good Picture, or Drawing as Connoisseurs pretend to find, may Learn to see the same thing in Themselves, their Eyes being once open’d ‘tis like a New Sense, and New Pleasures flow in as often as the Objects of that Superinduc’d Sight present themselves, which (to People of Condition Especially) very frequently happens, or may be procur’d, whether Here at Home, or in their Travels Abroad. When a Gentleman has learn’d to see the Beauties and Excellencies that are really in good Pictures, and Drawings, and which may be learnt by conversing with Such, and applying himself to the consideration of them, he will look upon That with Joy which he Now passes over with very little Pleasure, if not with Indifference : Nay a Sketch, a Scrabble of the Hand of a Great Master will be capable of administering to him a Greater Degree of Pleasure than those who know it not by Experience will easily believe. Besides the Graceful, and Noble Attitudes, the Beauty of Colours, and forms, and the fine Effects of Light, and Shadow, which none sees as a Connoisseur does, Such a one enters farther than any other Can into the Beauties of the Invention, Expression, and other Parts of the Work he is considering : He sees Strokes of Art, Contrivances, Expedients, a Delicacy, and Spirit that others see not, or very Imperfectly.

term translated by EFFET in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 404-407.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → lumière

Quotation

A Painter is allow’d sometimes to depart even from Natural, and Historical Truth.
Thus in the Carton of the Draught of Fishes
Rafaëlle has made a Boat too little to hold the Figures he has plac’d in it ; and this is so visible, that Some are apt to Triumph over that great Man, […] ; but the Truth is, had he made the Boat large enough for those Figures his Picture would have been all Boat, which would have had a Disagreeable Effect ; […].

term translated by EFFET in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 38.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

The truth is, ‘tis a little choquing to see such a Mixture of Antique, and Modern Figures, of Christianity, and Heathenism in the same Pictures [ndr : Le cycle de Marie de Médicis par Rubens] ; but this is much owing to its Novelty. […] He had moreover Another very good Reason for what he did on this Occasion : The Stories he had to paint were Modern, and the Habits, and Ornaments must be so too, which would not have had a very agreeable effect in Painting : These Allegorical Additions make a wonderful Improvement ; they vary, enliven, and enrich the Work ; as any one may perceive that will imagine the Pictures as they must have been, had Rubens been terrified by the Objections which he certainly must have foreseen would be made afterwards, and so had left all these Heathen Gods, and Goddesses, and the rest of the Fictitious Figures out of the Composition.

term translated by EFFET in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 88-89.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la composition
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix