DESIGN

DESIGN (n.)

BEWERP (nld.) · DESSIN (fra.) · DISEGNO (ita.) · LINE (eng.) · LINE (eng.) · ONTWERP (nld.) · TEKENING (nld.) · VOOR-BEWORP (nld.) · ZEICHENKUNST (deu.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
CONTOUR (fra.) · DESSIN (fra.) · DESSINER (fra.) · INTENTION (fra.) · TEKENING (nld.) · TRAIT (fra.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
DESSIN (fra.)
BAXANDALL, Michael, « English Disegno », dans CHANEY, Edward et MACK, Peter (éd.), England and the Continental Renaissance. Essays in Honour of J. B. Trapp, Woodbridge - Rochester, The Boydell Press, 1990, p. 203-214.
BERMINGHAM, Ann, Learning to Draw: Studies in the Cultural History of a Polite and Useful Art, New Haven - London, Yale University Press, 2000.
BOUBLI, Lizzie, « DESSIN », dans HECK, Michèle-Caroline (éd.), LexArt. Les mots de la peinture (France, Allemagne, Angleterre, Pays-Bas, 1600-1750) [édition anglaise, 2018], Montpellier, Presses Universitaires de la Méditerranée, 2018, p. 167-172.
DICKEL, Hans, Deutsche Zeichenbücher des Barock: eine Studie zur Geschichte der Künstlerausbildung, Hildesheim - Zürich - New York, G. Olms Verl, 1987.
GIBSON-WOOD, Carol, Jonathan Richardson: Art Theorist of the English Enlightenment, New Haven - London, Yale University Press, 2000.
GIBSON-WOOD, Carol, « “A Judiciously Disposed Collection”: Jonathan Richardson Senior's Cabinet of Drawings », dans BAKER, Christopher, ELAM, Caroline et WARWICK, Genevieve (éd.), Collecting Prints and Drawings in Europe (c. 1500-1750), Aldershot, Ashgate, 2003, p. 155-171.
GOOD, Caroline Anne, “Lovers of Art”. Early English Literature on the Connoisseurship of Pictures, Thesis, University of York, 2013 [En ligne : http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/5694/1/Caroline%20Good%20'Lovers%20of%20Art'%20PhD%20Thesis.pdf consulté le 11/07/2016].
HANSON, Craig A., The English Virtuoso: Art, Medicine, and Antiquarianism in the Age of Empiricism, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2009.
HEILMANN, Maria, NANOBASHVILI, Nino et PFISTERER, Ulrich (éd.), Punkt, Punkt, Komma, Strich. Zeichenbücher in Europa ca. 1525-1925, cat. exp., München, Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte - Hildesheim, Universitätsbibliothek, 2014-2016, Dietmar Klinger Verlag, 2014.
HEILMANN, Maria, NANOBASHVILI, Nino, TEUTENBERG, Tobias et PFISTERER, Ulrich (éd.), Lernt Zeichnen ! Techniken zwischen Kunst und Wissenschaft, 1525-1925, cat. exp., Heidelberg, Universitätsbibliothek, 2015-2016, Dietmar Klinger Verlag, 2015.
LEVY, F. J., « Henry Peacham and the Art of Drawing », Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, 37, 1974, p. 174-190 [En ligne : http://www.jstor.org/stable/750839 consulté le 30/03/2018].
OCCHIPINTI, Carmelo, Il disegno in Francia nella letteratura artistica del Cinquecento, Firenze, Studio per edizioni scelte, 2003.
PETRIOLI TOFANI, Annamaria, PROSPERI VALENTI RODINÒ, Simonetta et SCIOLLA, Gianni Carlo, Il Disegno. Forme, tecniche, significati, Milano, Silvava editoriale, 1991.
PRAT, Louis-Antoine, Le dessin français au XVIIIe siècle, Paris, Somogy, 2017.
PRAT, Louis-Antoine, Le dessin français au XVIIe siècle, Paris, Somogy, 2013.
ROUGÉ, Bertrand (éd.), Ratures et repentirs, Actes du colloque de Pau, Pau, Publications de l'Université de Pau, 1996.
TORDELLA, Piera Giovanna, Il disegno nell’Europa del Settecento. Regioni teoriche, ragioni critiche, Firenze, Olschki, 2012.

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

4 sources
9 quotations

Quotation

After some practice with the Pen (which follows the use of the Cole) proceed to shadow, with black and white Chalks, in stroakes, or sweetning (as in Painting).
For better directions herein, get some Designes or draughts, done in
Chalke, Red-oaker, dry Colours, Croyons, or Pastills, for your patterns.

draught

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique du dessin

Quotation

Design.
Has two Significations : First, As a part of Painting, it signifies the just Measures, Proportions, and Outvvard Forms that a Body, imitated from Nature, ought to havt. Secondly, It signifies the whole Composition of a piece of Painting ; as when we say, There is great Design in such a Piece.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Quotation

Design.
Has two Significations : First, As a part of Painting, it signifies the just Measures, Proportions, and Outvvard Forms that a Body, imitated from Nature, ought to havt. Secondly, It signifies the whole Composition of a piece of Painting ; as when we say, There is great Design in such a Piece.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

Traveller,
           
Design is the Expressing with a Pen, or Pencil, or other Instrument, the Likeness of any Object by its out Lines, or Contours ; and he that Understands and Mannages well these first Lines, working after Nature still, and using extream Diligence, and skill may with Practice and Judgment, arrive to an Excellency in the Art.
                        Friend,
            Me thinks that should be no difficult Matter, for we see many whose Inclination carys them to Draw any thing they see, and they perform it with ease.
                       
Traveller,
            I grant you, Inclination goes a great way in disposing the Hand, but a strong Imagination only, will not carry a Painter through ; For when he compares his Work to
Nature, he will soon find, that great Judgment is requisite, as well as a Lively Fancy ; and particularly when he comes to place many Objects together in one Piece or Story, which are all to have a just relation to one another. There he will find that not only the habit of the Hand but the strength of the Mind is requisite ; therefore all the Eminent Painters that ever were, spent more time in Designing after the Life, and after the Statues of the Antients, then ever did in learning how to colour their Works ; that so they might be Masters of Design, and be able to place readily every Object in its true situation.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Quotation

Traveller.
           
I must then repeat to you what I told you at our first Meeting [ndr : Dialogue I, « Explaining the Art of Painting »] ; which is, That the Art of Painting has three Parts ; which are, Design, Colouring, and Invention ; and under this third, is that which we call Disposition ; which is properly the Order in which all the Parts of the Story are disposed, so as to produce one effect according to the Design of the Painter ; and that is the first Effect which a good Piece of History is to produce in the Spectator ; that is, if it be a Picture of a joyful Event, that all that is in it be Gay and Smiling, to the very Landskips, Houses, Heavens, Cloaths, &c. And that all the Aptitudes tend to Mirth. The same, if the Story be Sad, or Solemn ; and so for the rest. And a Piece that does not do this at first sight, is most certainly faulty though it never so well Designed, or never so well Coloured ; nay, though there be Learning and Invention in it ; for as a Play that is designed to make me Laugh, is most certainly an ill one if it makes me Cry. So an Historical Piece that doth not produce the Effect it is designed for, cannot pretend to an Excellency, though it be never so finely Painted.

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la peinture
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

Traveller.
           
I must then repeat to you what I told you at our first Meeting [ndr : Dialogue I, « Explaining the Art of Painting »] ; which is, That the Art of Painting has three Parts ; which are, Design, Colouring, and Invention ; and under this third, is that which we call Disposition ; which is properly the Order in which all the Parts of the Story are disposed, so as to produce one effect according to the Design of the Painter ; and that is the first Effect which a good Piece of History is to produce in the Spectator ; that is, if it be a Picture of a joyful Event, that all that is in it be Gay and Smiling, to the very Landskips, Houses, Heavens, Cloaths, &c. And that all the Aptitudes tend to Mirth. The same, if the Story be Sad, or Solemn ; and so for the rest. And a Piece that does not do this at first sight, is most certainly faulty though it never so well Designed, or never so well Coloured ; nay, though there be Learning and Invention in it ; for as a Play that is designed to make me Laugh, is most certainly an ill one if it makes me Cry. So an Historical Piece that doth not produce the Effect it is designed for, cannot pretend to an Excellency, though it be never so finely Painted.

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la peinture
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

DESIGN or DRAWING
By these Terms is sometimes understood the expressing our Thoughts upon Paper, or whatever other flat Superficies ; and that by Resemblances form’d by a Pen, Crayon, Chalk, or the like. But more commonly, The giving the Just Form, and Dimension of Visible Objects, according as they appear to the Eye ; if they are pretended to be describ’d in their Natural Dimensions ; If Not, but Bigger, or Lesser, then Drawing, or Designing signifies only the giving those Things their true Form, which implies an exact proportionable Magnifying, or Diminishing in every part alike
And this comprehends also giving the true Shapes, Places, and even Degrees of Lights, Shadows, and Reflections ; because if these are not right, if the thing has not its due Force, or Relief, the true Form of what is pretended to be drawn cannot be given : These shew the Out-Line all round, and in every part, as well as where the Object is terminated on its Back-Ground.

In a Composition of several Figures, or whatever other Bodies, if the Perspective is not just the Drawing of that Composition is false. This therefore is also imply’d by this Term. That the Perspective must be observ’d in the Drawing of a Single Figure cannot be doubted.
I know
Drawing is not commonly understood to comprehend the Clair-obscure, Relief, and Perspective, but it does not follow however that what I advance is not right.
But if the Out-Lines are only mark’d, this also is Drawing ; ‘tis giving the true Form of what is pretended to, that is, the Out-Line.
The Drawing in the latter, and most common Sense ;
besides that it must be Just, must be pronounced Boldly, Clearly, and without Ambiguity : Consequently, neither the Out-Lines, nor the Forms of the Lights, and Shadows must be Confus’d, and Uncertain, or Wooly (as Painters call it) upon pretence of Softness ; nor on the other hand may they be Sharp, Hard, or Dry ; for either of these are Extreams ; Nature lies between them.

drawing · designing

term translated by DESSIN in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 114-116.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Quotation

DESIGN or DRAWING
By these Terms is sometimes understood the expressing our Thoughts upon Paper, or whatever other flat Superficies ; and that by Resemblances form’d by a Pen, Crayon, Chalk, or the like. But more commonly, The giving the Just Form, and Dimension of Visible Objects, according as they appear to the Eye ; if they are pretended to be describ’d in their Natural Dimensions ; If Not, but Bigger, or Lesser, then Drawing, or Designing signifies only the giving those Things their true Form, which implies an exact proportionable Magnifying, or Diminishing in every part alike
And this comprehends also giving the true Shapes, Places, and even Degrees of Lights, Shadows, and Reflections ; because if these are not right, if the thing has not its due Force, or Relief, the true Form of what is pretended to be drawn cannot be given : These shew the Out-Line all round, and in every part, as well as where the Object is terminated on its Back-Ground.

In a Composition of several Figures, or whatever other Bodies, if the Perspective is not just the Drawing of that Composition is false. This therefore is also imply’d by this Term. That the Perspective must be observ’d in the Drawing of a Single Figure cannot be doubted.
I know
Drawing is not commonly understood to comprehend the Clair-obscure, Relief, and Perspective, but it does not follow however that what I advance is not right.
But if the Out-Lines are only mark’d, this also is Drawing ; ‘tis giving the true Form of what is pretended to, that is, the Out-Line.
The Drawing in the latter, and most common Sense ;
besides that it must be Just, must be pronounced Boldly, Clearly, and without Ambiguity : Consequently, neither the Out-Lines, nor the Forms of the Lights, and Shadows must be Confus’d, and Uncertain, or Wooly (as Painters call it) upon pretence of Softness ; nor on the other hand may they be Sharp, Hard, or Dry ; for either of these are Extreams ; Nature lies between them.

drawing · designing

term translated by DESSIN in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 114-116.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Quotation

WE have been more particular in the Relation of this famous Piece [ndr : Bell fait ici référence au tableau commencé par Apelle et Protogènes sur lequel ces deux artistes ont successivement tracé des lignes – événement précédent de peu leur rencontre], because a large Dispute hangs upon it {Pliny, Lib. 35. Ch. 10.} : and the late Commentator upon our Author, Ludov. Demontiosius, seems very much offended at the generally received Acceptation of the Story of this noble Contention ; and would not by any Means admits that this Tryal of Skill was about the Subtilty of Lines ; for, as he says, with a good Share of Truth in the main, in a coloured Picture, or Painting, there is so little Use of Lines, that the very Appearance of any is justly reproveable ; for the Extremities should be lost and confounded in the Shadows, and ought to go off without any Thing of the least Stiffness, or Sharpness of a Line.
NEITHER will he admit it in Drawings, or Designs, with the Coal, or Pen, for that in those the true ARTIST never regarded so much the Fineness, or Courseness of his Touches ; but only how and where they served best to express the proper Shadowing and Raising of his Draught according to the Life ; and brings in for Instance many Drawings of the celebrated Masters of his Time, which he had seen of
Mich. Angela Bonoroti, Raphael de Urbin, Salviati, Polydore, and the Great Titian’s, where his Observation does not take Notice that any have in the least affected the Nicety of curious Lines.

drawing

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique du dessin
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin