LINE

LINE (n.)

DESIGN (eng.) · LIGNE (fra.) · LIJN (nld.) · LINEA (ita.) · LINIE (deu.) · STRICHLEIN (deu.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
LIGNE (fra.) · LIJN (nld.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
LIGNE (fra.)
LE RIDER, Jacqueline, « Ligne et couleur  : histoire d’un différent », Revue germanique internationale, 10, 1998, p. 173-184 [En ligne : http://rgi.revues.org/694 consulté le 28/04/2015].

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CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

8 sources
10 quotations

Quotation

So also in Art ; to paint the line or meeting of a Centaur in his two Natures, which must seem to unite and joyn insensibly, as not to distinguish where they meet ; deceiving the Eye with a stealth of change ; a pleasant confusion of differing Colours. It is hard to be expressed, and difficult to be done, the very excellencie of an Artist ; when the extream or utmost lines, the unrestrained extent of the figure, lightly and smoothly coosin the Eye, as if something were behind the figure, more to be then the Eye sees, when the Lineaments, that do circumscribe, or include the figure, are so thin, as to varnish by little and little ; {Of Spirits and Souls Painted} the highest subtility of a piece, like spirits and souls painted.
{A Geometricall Line.} You may call it a
Geomettricall Line ; which is, without breadth : Observe the parting of the Sun-shadow, upon the Wall, the line parting the light, and that is thus

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Quotation

{Proportion.} All which representations are after declared in that part of the Definition [ndr : la définition de la peinture p. 24], where it is said, that Painting, with proportionable lines maketh, &c. where we must Note that the Painter in his descriptions, doth not draw lines at randome, without Rule, Proportion, or Art, (as some vainly have imagined) since the Arrantest Bunglers that are, proceed with some little Method, and although Horace in his book de Arte Poetica saith : that


The Poet and the Painter, hath like Patent to invent,
A Story and dispose the same as shall him best content.


Yet that is thus to be understood, that it is lawfull for him to express a
Figure, […] ; this only excepted the Painter is bound to proceed in all his Works according to proportion and art. Wherefore before you begin to Stell, delineate or trick out the proportion of a Man, you ought to know his true Quantity and Stature for it were a gross absurdity to make a Man of the length of Eight Faces, which is of Nine or Ten, besides this, we ought to know what proportion the Fore-head hath with the Nose, […], and in a Word to learn the true proportions of all things natural and artificial.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion
L’ARTISTE → qualités
L’ARTISTE → règles et préceptes

Quotation

Friend,
            When a Painter has acquired any Excellency in
Desinging, readily and strongly ; What has he to do next ?
                        Traveller,
            That is not half his Work, for then he must begin to mannage his
Colours, it being particularly by them, that he is to express the greatness of his Art. ’Tis they that give, as it were, Life and Soul to all that he does ; without them, his Lines will be but Lines that are flat, and without a Body, but the addition of Colours makes that appear round ; and as it were out of the Picture, which else would be plain and dull. ’Tis they that must deceive the Eye, to the degree, to make Flesh appear warm and soft, and to give an Air of Life, so as his Picture may seem almost to Breath and Move.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

Chap. VI, Of Shadowing, and Rules to be observed therein.
The out-lines of any Draught or Picture give the Symmetry or Proportion, which is enough to a good judgment : So the Figures before in this Book have only the out-lines, and those are best to practice first by : I say, the Out-lines shew the Proportion to a good judgment ; but the Lines and Shadows give the lively likeness. In Shadowing therefore of any Picture you must observe these Rules following.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

Draught is a Physical Line, or Lineal Demonstration ; and hath always some Dimentions, if it be never so slender : and serves to represent Bodys according to their Forms, Aspects and Scituation ; Limiting and Determining the surface of an Object ; and Making out the Several Parts, which are contain’d therein. For no Superficies can Exist, without being Terminated by Lines, Streight, Circular or Mixt.
            The
Extent of Draught is Immense ; for it is not only concern’d in all the Visible Things in Nature, but in all Things which the Fancy or Imagination can form any Idea of, that can be compris’d under the Figure of Body : nay, so vast is its extent, that it adventures to Dive into the very Soul, and express its Thoughts ; for though Colour is accessary to Expression, yet nothing can be Terminated without Lines.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Quotation

The Face is admirably well Drawn [ndr : du portrait de la comtesse Dowager of Exeter, par Van Dyck]; the Features are pronounc’d Clean, and Firmly, so as ‘tis evident he that did That conceiv’d strong, and Distinct Ideas, and saw wherein the Lines that form’d Those differ’d from all others ; there appears nothing of the Antique, or Raffaelle-Tast of Designing, but Nature, well understood, well chosen, and well manag’d ;

term translated by LIGNE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 32-33.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Quotation

He [ndr : un peintre] must not only have a nice Judgment to distinguish betwixt things nearly Resembling one another, but not the same […], but he must moreover have the same Delicacy in his Eyes to judge of the Tincts of Colours which are of infinite Variety ; and to distinguish whether a Line be streight, or curv’d a little ; whether This is exactly parallel to That, or oblique, and in what degree ; how This curv’d Line differs from That, if it differs at all, of which he must also judge ; whether what he has drawn is of the same Magnitude with what he pretends to imitate, and the like ; and must have a Hand exact enough to form these in his Work, answerable to the Ideas he has taken of them.

term translated by LIGNE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 19-20.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Quotation

The Contours must be Large, Square, and Boldly pronounc’d to produce Greatness ; and Delicate, and finely Waved, and Contrasted to be Gracious. There is a Beauty in a Line. in the Shape of a Finger, or Toe, even in that of a Reed, or Leaf, or the most inconsiderable things in Nature : I have Drawings of Guilio Romano of something of this Kind ; his Insects, and Vegetables are Natural, but as much above those of other Painters as his Men are : There is that in these things which Common Eyes see not, but which the Great Masters know how to give, and They Only.

term translated by LIGNE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 154-155.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Quotation

WE have been more particular in the Relation of this famous Piece [ndr : Bell fait ici référence au tableau commencé par Apelle et Protogènes sur lequel ces deux artistes ont successivement tracé des lignes – événement précédent de peu leur rencontre], because a large Dispute hangs upon it {Pliny, Lib. 35. Ch. 10.} : and the late Commentator upon our Author, Ludov. Demontiosius, seems very much offended at the generally received Acceptation of the Story of this noble Contention ; and would not by any Means admits that this Tryal of Skill was about the Subtilty of Lines ; for, as he says, with a good Share of Truth in the main, in a coloured Picture, or Painting, there is so little Use of Lines, that the very Appearance of any is justly reproveable ; for the Extremities should be lost and confounded in the Shadows, and ought to go off without any Thing of the least Stiffness, or Sharpness of a Line.
NEITHER will he admit it in Drawings, or Designs, with the Coal, or Pen, for that in those the true ARTIST never regarded so much the Fineness, or Courseness of his Touches ; but only how and where they served best to express the proper Shadowing and Raising of his Draught according to the Life ; and brings in for Instance many Drawings of the celebrated Masters of his Time, which he had seen of
Mich. Angela Bonoroti, Raphael de Urbin, Salviati, Polydore, and the Great Titian’s, where his Observation does not take Notice that any have in the least affected the Nicety of curious Lines.

Conceptual field(s)

MANIÈRE ET STYLE → le faire et la main
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique du dessin

Quotation

THIS seeming strain’d Opinion, Claudius Salmatius controverts again, […] ; and further, he would establish and set up the Agreeableness and Congruity of the Use of Lines in the best of Paintings, from that sort of Picture peculiarly call’d Linearis Pictura ; which not only express’d the Proflles and Circumscriptions of the Figure, but their Practice was also, intus lineas spargere, from the Phrasings and constant Use of several Terms of ART ; for what else can be employ’d by Lineamenta, the Lineaments of a Face, or Figure, by Apelle’s Nulla dies sine linea, which became Proverbial, and as the Poet varies it,
           
Nulla dies abeat quin linea ducta supersit.  
                                                                                  Hor.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin