BEWERP (n. n.)

DESIGN (eng.) · DESSIN (fra.) · ENTWURF (deu.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
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3 quotations

Quotation

Ghelijck wy dan sien dat dieghene dewelcke de eerste hitte haeres werck-suchtighen ghemoedts sonder eenigh achterdenken op volghen, het werck soo verde plaghten te brenghen, dat het hun onmoghelick is het selvighe wel te verbeteren; soo vinden wy ’t in alle manieren geraedsaemer dat de Leerlinghen, ja selfs oock de volleerde het gantsche bewerp haeres wercks in ’t eerste maer alleen rouwelick souden afschetsen, om d’eerste schetse nae een redelijck verpoosinge wederom en wederom in de hand te nemen, eerse ’t gheheele werck bestaen op te maecken.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Just like we see that those who follow the first heat of their energetic mind without any consideration, tend to advance the work so much, that it becomes impossible for them to improve it well; as such we find it advisable in any way that the students, yes even the accomplished [artists, red.], would first only roughly sketch the entire design of their work, to then take the first sketch in their hands again and again, before they continue to lay out the entire work.

This section of the text is much more elaborate in the Dutch edition than in the Latin (1637) and English editions and the terms are not included there. [MO]

term translated by / in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 120 in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 207
term translated by / in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 120 in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 207

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Quotation

Noch openbaert sich d’ongheloofelicke kracht deser Symmetrie allermeest in de Teycken-konst ofte in d’eerste afschetsinghe der ghevondener dinghen. Dies plaghten oock allerley Konst-vroede Mannen het schierlicke wel gheproportioneerde bewerp van een ghenoeghsaemlick door-kaude Inventie voor het voornaemste grond-werck deser Konsten te houden; wanneer naemelick d’arbeydsaeme Konstenaers haere eerste invallen, sonder ’t behulp van eenigh vermaeckelicke Coleuren, in enckele proportionele linien soo gheestighlick voor ooghen stellen, datmen allenthalven de levendighe kracht der dinghen selver in d’eenvoudigheyd haerer omtrecks en de slechtigheyd haerer eenverwigher binne-wercken verneemt.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Yet the unbelievable power of this Symmetry reveals itself most in the Art of Drawing or in the first sketch of the found things. Various Art-loving Men tended to keep this well-proportioned design of a sufficiently conceived Invention for the main groundwork of these Arts; namely when the diligent Artists envision their first ideas in a few proportional lines, without the help of any entertaining colours, that one learns everything about the lively power of things itself in the simplicity of its contour and the mediocrity of its one-coloured interior.

This section in the Dutch edition is different from the English and Latin edition. [MO]

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin

Quotation

Het grootste behulp onser Ordinantie is daer in gheleghen, dat wy de voorghestelde materie grondighlick verstaen, dat wy ’t ghene ons d’Inventie voord-draeght onophoudelick overlegghen onse ghedachten door de ghestaedigheyd deser oeffeninghe allengskens daer toe ghewennende, datse sich de waere teghenwoordigheyd der dinghen selver door den aendacht van een mercksaeme verbeeldinghe souden voor-stellen; want ons ghemoed en kan t’historische vervolgh der voorvallender materie soo haest niet vatten, of daer sal ons daedelick een vaerdighe en gantsch sekere maniere van Ordinantie den sin schieten. Doch hier moeten wy, om goed werck te maecken, wel toesien, dat wy al met den eersten tot den springh-ader van de Historie selver soecken te ghenaecken; ten eynde dat wy ’t volle bescheyd der gantsch saecke inghedroncken hebbende, ons selven ’t gheheele bewerp der materie t’effens moghten voor ooghen stellen: Want indien wy de saecke maer alleen ten halven ende verwarrelick insien ende begrijpen, het en wil noyt wouteren, daer sal immermeer ’t een of ’t ander ontbreken, en onse Dispositie sal noodwendighlick lam ende onvolmaeckt sijn. Het eerste dan ’t welck ons in desen moeyelicken arbeyd der Ordinantie staet waer te nemen, is daer in voornaemelick gheleghen, dat wy ’t gantsche vervolgh van een beeldenrijcke materie in onse ghedachten volkomenlick omvangen: Volght daer op dat wy de bysondere figuren der selviger materie door de verbeeldenskracht soo bescheydenlick aenschouwen, datse door gheswindigheyt onses werckenden geests tot haere eygene plaetsen vaerdighlick schijnen toe te loopen:

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] The largest assistance to our Ordinance lies therein, that we thoroughly understand the proposed matter, that we insistently consider that which the Invention proposes to us, accustoming our thoughts gradually to it through the steadiness of this practice, that it would imagine the true circumstances of things itself through the attention of a remarkable imagination; because our mind almost cannot grasp the historical sequence of the occurring matter, or there will immediately appear an apt and rather certain manner of Ordinance. Yet here we must, in order to make a good work, pay attention, that we attempt to immediately come to the origine of the History itself; in order that we may – after we have drank in the full record of the whole situation – quickly imagine the whole design of the matter: Because if we only realize and understand the half of the situation or in a confused way, it will never happen, something or else will always be lacking, and our Disposition will necessarily be lame and imperfect. The first thing that we have to observe in this difficult task of Ordinance, is that we fully catch the whole sequence of an ornate matter in our thoughts: It then follows that we watch the separate figures of the same matter so intently through our imagination, that it will appear to proficiently walk towards its own place through the rapidity of our working mind.

This section does not occur in the Latin edition of 1637. In the English edition, this paragraph is more concise and formulated in a different manner. The part after 'Het eerste dan 't welck ons...' is not included in the English edition. [MO]

term translated by / in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 309-310

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin