GOLTZIUS, Hendrick ( 1558-1617 )

GOLTZIUS, Hendrick ( 1558-1617 )

ISNI:0000000080985671 Getty:500023327

Quotation

Een goede wetenschap hier van te hebben, gheeft ons dit voordeel, dat wy de muskelen te recht leeren kennen, waer sy beginnen, en waer sy eyndigen; hoe sy haer bewegen, ende in 't beroeren haer veranderen; hoe sy in-wicken, en waer sy wederom uyt-puylen, hoe een lichaem om een schoon proportie te hebben, dient verdeelt te wesen; sy wijst ons 'tonderscheyt tusschen Mans ende Vrouwen beelden, het verschillende de proportie van Kinderen, en volwassene. […] Leert sy ons, hoe in de ghestalte van een Mensche, altijdt een rechte perpendiculaer of loot-linie uyt te vinden is: oock een ghelijck-beenighe, en ghelijck-zijdighe dry-hoeck, een rechte vierkant, met een volkomen ronte, ende veel nutticheden meer. […] Niet te min […], wijs ick u tot de Anatomie van Meester Heynderick, en Meester Cornelis van Haerlem, welcke u gevilde pleyster-beelden, by gebreck van andere, na-gelaten hebben, waer door ghy eeniger mate tot kennisse van naecte komen sult, het gene ons ten hoochsten dienstich is, in welcke P.F. de Grebber, wel ervaren, en boven vele andere seer uytsteeckende is, door de menichfuldighe ondersoeckinge, en wonder naeuwe waerneminge, dien hy hier in gebruyct heeft, lettende op alle hoedanigheden, die hy in alle gestalte seer scherp waer neemt, hoe de selve door de beweginge veranderen, waer door hy met veel arbeydts toe geraect is; ende eenighe van sijn voornaemste jaren mede door gebracht, daer hy lichtelick door 't Anatomiseren toe geraect soude hebben, en die tijdt tot andere saecken gebruyckt hebben tot dienst van de Konst.

Quotation

Des différentes manieres de Graver.
Il y en a qui montrent une grande facilité de Burin, les autres ont une maniere fatiguée ; on en voit qui affectent de croiser leurs tailles fort en lozange, & d’autres les font toutes quarrées. Ces manieres faciles dont j’entends parler, sont celles de Goltzius, Muller, Lucas Kilian, Mellan, & quelques autres, qui semblent en plusieurs recontres ne s’être attachés qu’à faire voir par un tournoyement de tailles, qu’ils étoient maîtres de leur Burin, sans se mettre en peine de la justesse des contours, des expressions, ni de l’effet de clair-obscur qui se trouve dans les desseins & les Tableaux que l’on veut représenter.
Celles que je trouve fatiguées le sont par une infinité de traits et de points confondus les uns dans les autres & sans aucun ordre, qui ressemblent plutôt à un dessein qu’à de la gravûre.
Il ne faut jamais croiser les tailles trop lozanges particulierement dans les chairs, parce qu’elles forment des angles aigus, qui font une piece de treillis tabizé fort désagréable, ce qui ôte à la vûe le repros qu’elle souhaite sur toute sorte d’ouvrages.
On ne doit croiser les tailles si fort en lozange que dans quelques nuages, dans des tempêtes, pour représenter les vagues de la mer, dans les peaux des animaux velus, & cela fait aussi fort bien dans les feuilles des arbres.
La maniere entre quarré & lozange est me semble plus utile & plus agréable aux yeux : aussi est-elle plus difficile à cause que l’inégalité des traits [p. 107 160] s’en remarque davantage, & quand je dis de faire entre les deux, je ne dis point de faire tout à fait quarré, parce que cela tient trop de la pierre.

Quotation

Of Colouring and Shadowing of History in Limning, and also other Necessary Observations.


The differences between Limning Pictures to the Life, or History, are Infinite ; notwithstanding the same Colours that are used for one do also for the other. And to particularise but part of what may be well said upon this Subject, would be too tedeous, if not endless. The most Remarkable is most certainly in the Variety of Colouring of things according to their several Sexes and Ages ; and also of Invention of ordering and well Stelling. All things which are to be represented, are many times according to the Humour, Judgement, and Discretion of the Master. We see generally in the Practice of the best and most Famous Painters, that they that do follow the Life, do tie themselves strictly and precisely to follow what they see in the Life, to immitate it as near as possible ; yet in their Inventions they assume to themselves such a Gentile Liberty and Licence, both in Colouring and Ordering ; but not so far as to run into those Extremes as
Bartholomæus Spranger, Henry Goltzius, Abraham Blomart, and Outeawale, and several other Dutch Painters, run into about the Year 1588 ; for their Inventions at that time and Actions were so extravagantly strain’d and stretch to that degree beyond Nature, that made their Works seem to the Judicious Eye very Ridiculous, and contrary to Nature ; and at that time it was grown to such an Imposture or Mode, that he was counted no Master that could not strain his Actions in that extravagant manner. Which Mode was afterwards laid aside, and the Works that those Masters afterwards made were incomparably Good, by their Embracing more the Ancient Italian way of DESIGNING, which was more Modest, Gentile, and Graceful. So far they abused the Modest Licence, that so Graced the Admirable Works of Titian, Michael Angelo, and most of the Eminent Italians of that Age. And others have been as Extravagant in their Colouring. Which two Extremes may be both avoided by imitating that Divine Titian for Colouring, who was of all others esteemed the best.

Quotation

Drapery (so called of the French word Drap, which is cloath) principally consisteth in the true making and folding your garment, giving to every fold his proper naturall doubling and shadow ; which is great skill, and scarce attained unto by any of our countrey and ordinary Painters : insomuch that if I would make triall of a good workeman ; I would finde him quickly by the folding of a garment, or the shadowing of a gowne, sheete, or such like.
{What Method is to bee observed in drapery}. The method now to be observed in Drapery, is to draw first the outmost or extreme lines of your garment, as you will, full of narrow, and leave wide and spare places, where you thinke you shall have need of folds ; draw your greater folds alwayes first, not letting any line touch, or directly crosse another, for then shall you bring an irrecoverable confusion into your worke : […]. I would herein above all other have you to imitate
Albert Durer, if you can get his peeces, if not Goltzius or some other.

Quotation

The Art of Etching.
The Grounds and Rules of Etching.


Before that you begin to
Etch upon copper, it is very necessary to practise the Art of Drawing, till you be able if need require to draw any head after the life, or to draw a design, for it you intend to practice the Art of Etching, you will find it very profitable to draw after good prints, which are well designed, and graved, and when you have practised so long that you are able to coppy any print, or drawing very exactly ; then draw after good Heads of plaister or figures, according to your own fancy, which will learn you to shadow according to Art, if well observed, therefore be sure when you draw after plaister, to observe very exactly to take the true outlines or circumferences, and then take notice how the shadow falls, then shadow it very faint and soft, where need requires. The prints which I recommend unto you as absolutely the best to learn to Etch or Grave after, be the prints of Henry Goldshis and Hermon Muller, therefore it is very convenient to leaan to hatch with the Pen exactly after  either of the aforesaid prints of Goldshis or Muller, and when you have brought it to that perfection ; and can draw very well after plaister, you may practise to draw after the life ; but before you draw after the life, you must be very exact and true in your outlines or circumferences.

Quotation

The Art of Etching.
The Grounds and Rules of Etching.


Before that you begin to
Etch upon copper, it is very necessary to practise the Art of Drawing, till you be able if need require to draw any head after the life, or to draw a design, for it you intend to practice the Art of Etching, you will find it very profitable to draw after good prints, which are well designed, and graved, and when you have practised so long that you are able to coppy any print, or drawing very exactly ; then draw after good Heads of plaister or figures, according to your own fancy, which will learn you to shadow according to Art, if well observed, therefore be sure when you draw after plaister, to observe very exactly to take the true outlines or circumferences, and then take notice how the shadow falls, then shadow it very faint and soft, where need requires. The prints which I recommend unto you as absolutely the best to learn to Etch or Grave after, be the prints of Henry Goldshis and Hermon Muller, therefore it is very convenient to leaan to hatch with the Pen exactly after  either of the aforesaid prints of Goldshis or Muller, and when you have brought it to that perfection ; and can draw very well after plaister, you may practise to draw after the life ; but before you draw after the life, you must be very exact and true in your outlines or circumferences.

Quotation

The Art of Etching.
The Grounds and Rules of Etching.


Before that you begin to
Etch upon copper, it is very necessary to practise the Art of Drawing, till you be able if need require to draw any head after the life, or to draw a design, for it you intend to practice the Art of Etching, you will find it very profitable to draw after good prints, which are well designed, and graved, and when you have practised so long that you are able to coppy any print, or drawing very exactly ; then draw after good Heads of plaister or figures, according to your own fancy, which will learn you to shadow according to Art, if well observed, therefore be sure when you draw after plaister, to observe very exactly to take the true outlines or circumferences, and then take notice how the shadow falls, then shadow it very faint and soft, where need requires. The prints which I recommend unto you as absolutely the best to learn to Etch or Grave after, be the prints of Henry Goldshis and Hermon Muller, therefore it is very convenient to leaan to hatch with the Pen exactly after  either of the aforesaid prints of Goldshis or Muller, and when you have brought it to that perfection ; and can draw very well after plaister, you may practise to draw after the life ; but before you draw after the life, you must be very exact and true in your outlines or circumferences.

Quotation

Et qu’appelez-vous bien graver, reprit Damon ? Est-ce couper le cuivre hardiment comme Goltius, ou poliment comme Bloëmart & Natalis ?
Ce n’est pas cela précisément, repliqua Pamphile, la premiere façon que vous attribuez à Goltius n’y est pas mesme fort propre ; puisque pour bien graver, il ne faut pas, s’il est possible, que le Graveur se fasse reconnoistre dans son Ouvrage : il doit simplement faire en sorte que l’Estampe gravée fasse le mesme effet (à la Couleur prés) que le Tableau qu’on se propose d’imiter.
Tous les Graveurs, dit Damon, ne font-ils pas cela ?
Non vrayement, repartit Pamphile, & il y en a peu qui le sachent faire, lors principalement qu’ils ont à graver un Tableau bien Colorié & bien entendu de Lumieres & d’Ombres. Ils en imitent les figures comme si elles estoient de Sculpture, & comme d'une même Couleur. Cependant les oppositions qui se trouvent dans les Tableaux par les differens tons de Couleurs, contribuant extrêmement à leur donner de la force, il n'est pas étonnant que leurs Estampes paroissent fades, & si bien loin de donner de l’estime pour les Originaux, elles ne servent qu'à les deshonorer. Ce n'est pas qu'il soit toûjours necessaire d'imiter les corps des Couleurs par les degrez du clair-obscur ; mais il se trouve souvent des occasions où il le faut faire indispensablement. Pour les manieres polies que vous attribuez à Bloëmart & à Natalis, elles sont sans contredit les plus agréables, quand les choses, dont je viens de vous parler, s'y rencontrent. Mais parmy toutes les Estampes où l’on voit ce bel artifice du clair-obscur, celles qui ont été gravées d’aprés les œuvres de Rubens, me semblent d’une beauté incomparable.

Quotation

Of Colouring and Shadowing of History in Limning, and also other Necessary Observations.


The differences between Limning Pictures to the Life, or History, are Infinite ; notwithstanding the same Colours that are used for one do also for the other. And to particularise but part of what may be well said upon this Subject, would be too tedeous, if not endless. The most Remarkable is most certainly in the Variety of Colouring of things according to their several Sexes and Ages ; and also of Invention of ordering and well Stelling. All things which are to be represented, are many times according to the Humour, Judgement, and Discretion of the Master. We see generally in the Practice of the best and most Famous Painters, that they that do follow the Life, do tie themselves strictly and precisely to follow what they see in the Life, to immitate it as near as possible ; yet in their Inventions they assume to themselves such a Gentile Liberty and Licence, both in Colouring and Ordering ; but not so far as to run into those Extremes as
Bartholomæus Spranger, Henry Goltzius, Abraham Blomart, and Outeawale, and several other Dutch Painters, run into about the Year 1588 ; for their Inventions at that time and Actions were so extravagantly strain’d and stretch to that degree beyond Nature, that made their Works seem to the Judicious Eye very Ridiculous, and contrary to Nature ; and at that time it was grown to such an Imposture or Mode, that he was counted no Master that could not strain his Actions in that extravagant manner. Which Mode was afterwards laid aside, and the Works that those Masters afterwards made were incomparably Good, by their Embracing more the Ancient Italian way of DESIGNING, which was more Modest, Gentile, and Graceful. So far they abused the Modest Licence, that so Graced the Admirable Works of Titian, Michael Angelo, and most of the Eminent Italians of that Age. And others have been as Extravagant in their Colouring. Which two Extremes may be both avoided by imitating that Divine Titian for Colouring, who was of all others esteemed the best.

Quotation

Of Colouring and Shadowing of History in Limning, and also other Necessary Observations.


The differences between Limning Pictures to the Life, or History, are Infinite ; notwithstanding the same Colours that are used for one do also for the other. And to particularise but part of what may be well said upon this Subject, would be too tedeous, if not endless. The most Remarkable is most certainly in the Variety of Colouring of things according to their several Sexes and Ages ; and also of Invention of ordering and well Stelling. All things which are to be represented, are many times according to the Humour, Judgement, and Discretion of the Master. We see generally in the Practice of the best and most Famous Painters, that they that do follow the Life, do tie themselves strictly and precisely to follow what they see in the Life, to immitate it as near as possible ; yet in their Inventions they assume to themselves such a Gentile Liberty and Licence, both in Colouring and Ordering ; but not so far as to run into those Extremes as
Bartholomæus Spranger, Henry Goltzius, Abraham Blomart, and Outeawale, and several other Dutch Painters, run into about the Year 1588 ; for their Inventions at that time and Actions were so extravagantly strain’d and stretch to that degree beyond Nature, that made their Works seem to the Judicious Eye very Ridiculous, and contrary to Nature ; and at that time it was grown to such an Imposture or Mode, that he was counted no Master that could not strain his Actions in that extravagant manner. Which Mode was afterwards laid aside, and the Works that those Masters afterwards made were incomparably Good, by their Embracing more the Ancient Italian way of DESIGNING, which was more Modest, Gentile, and Graceful. So far they abused the Modest Licence, that so Graced the Admirable Works of Titian, Michael Angelo, and most of the Eminent Italians of that Age. And others have been as Extravagant in their Colouring. Which two Extremes may be both avoided by imitating that Divine Titian for Colouring, who was of all others esteemed the best.

Quotation

19. [ndr: Regel] Wann du willens bist/ etwas nach dem Leben zu zeichnen/ so stehe zwey- auch wol dreymal so weit von deme/ was du nachzeichnen wilst/ als dessen Größe ist/ und habe vor dir etliche gleiche Linien in der imagination, damit besichtige/ was du zeichnest: alsdann werden dir/ solche Vorbildungs-Linien/ dessen rechte Erkäntnis geben. Dieses ist in allem Vornehmen/ auch in nachzeichnung der Antich-Studien/ zu observiren. Hierbey aber ist zu merken/ weil die berühmteste Antichen in der Vollkommenheit all-hoch gestiegen/ daß man denen just nachfolge/ und weder davon/ noch darzu thue: dann sonst irret man sehr weit/ wie vielen Franzosen/ auch Niederländern/ oft wiederfahren/ die ihre Sachen/ mit der von ihren Lehrmeistern angenommenen eignen bösen Manier/ nach den Antichen/ gemacht; daher solche/ wann sie auf dem Papier gestanden/ des guten wenig gehabt/ sondern mehr ihrem Callot oder Perier, auch des Sprangers/ Golzius oder Rubens Manier gefolget/ oder wenigst das ansehen gehabt/ daß sie ihnen gefolget. Ist derowegen den gerechten guten Antichen/ sowol als den raresten Gemählen/ ohne änderung/ geraden Wegs nachzufolgen: weil selbige/ gleichwie die heilige Schrift/ weder Castrirung noch Zusatz leiden.

Quotation

Des différentes manieres de Graver.
Il y en a qui montrent une grande facilité de Burin, les autres ont une maniere fatiguée ; on en voit qui affectent de croiser leurs tailles fort en lozange, & d’autres les font toutes quarrées. Ces manieres faciles dont j’entends parler, sont celles de Goltzius, Muller, Lucas Kilian, Mellan, & quelques autres, qui semblent en plusieurs recontres ne s’être attachés qu’à faire voir par un tournoyement de tailles, qu’ils étoient maîtres de leur Burin, sans se mettre en peine de la justesse des contours, des expressions, ni de l’effet de clair-obscur qui se trouve dans les desseins & les Tableaux que l’on veut représenter.
Celles que je trouve fatiguées le sont par une infinité de traits et de points confondus les uns dans les autres & sans aucun ordre, qui ressemblent plutôt à un dessein qu’à de la gravûre.
Il ne faut jamais croiser les tailles trop lozanges particulierement dans les chairs, parce qu’elles forment des angles aigus, qui font une piece de treillis tabizé fort désagréable, ce qui ôte à la vûe le repros qu’elle souhaite sur toute sorte d’ouvrages.
On ne doit croiser les tailles si fort en lozange que dans quelques nuages, dans des tempêtes, pour représenter les vagues de la mer, dans les peaux des animaux velus, & cela fait aussi fort bien dans les feuilles des arbres.
La maniere entre quarré & lozange est me semble plus utile & plus agréable aux yeux : aussi est-elle plus difficile à cause que l’inégalité des traits [p. 107 160] s’en remarque davantage, & quand je dis de faire entre les deux, je ne dis point de faire tout à fait quarré, parce que cela tient trop de la pierre.

Quotation

Et qu’appelez-vous bien graver, reprit Damon ? Est-ce couper le cuivre hardiment comme Goltius, ou poliment comme Bloëmart & Natalis ?
Ce n’est pas cela précisément, repliqua Pamphile, la premiere façon que vous attribuez à Goltius n’y est pas mesme fort propre ; puisque pour bien graver, il ne faut pas, s’il est possible, que le Graveur se fasse reconnoistre dans son Ouvrage : il doit simplement faire en sorte que l’Estampe gravée fasse le mesme effet (à la Couleur prés) que le Tableau qu’on se propose d’imiter.
Tous les Graveurs, dit Damon, ne font-ils pas cela ?
Non vrayement, repartit Pamphile, & il y en a peu qui le sachent faire, lors principalement qu’ils ont à graver un Tableau bien Colorié & bien entendu de Lumieres & d’Ombres. Ils en imitent les figures comme si elles estoient de Sculpture, & comme d'une même Couleur. Cependant les oppositions qui se trouvent dans les Tableaux par les differens tons de Couleurs, contribuant extrêmement à leur donner de la force, il n'est pas étonnant que leurs Estampes paroissent fades, & si bien loin de donner de l’estime pour les Originaux, elles ne servent qu'à les deshonorer. Ce n'est pas qu'il soit toûjours necessaire d'imiter les corps des Couleurs par les degrez du clair-obscur ; mais il se trouve souvent des occasions où il le faut faire indispensablement. Pour les manieres polies que vous attribuez à Bloëmart & à Natalis, elles sont sans contredit les plus agréables, quand les choses, dont je viens de vous parler, s'y rencontrent. Mais parmy toutes les Estampes où l’on voit ce bel artifice du clair-obscur, celles qui ont été gravées d’aprés les œuvres de Rubens, me semblent d’une beauté incomparable.

Quotation

Tot de Schilderkonst moetmen weten dat de Muskelen en Spieren, van de Grootste tot de Kleynste niet alle op het nauwkeurigst en moeten ondersogt werden, om die altijd in de naakten te vertoonen, want men valt er te ligt door in berisping, en schijnen soodanige Beelden (om dat het leven veel kleyne en twijffelagtige Muskelen heeft) ook meer Anatomische of Gevilde dan Leven Menschen of schoone naakten te zijn: Ook vertoonen haar de Muskelen in d’eene Mensch duydelijker dan inden anderen, ja in sommige zijn eenige kleyne Muskelen, heel verborgen, die wederom in andere sterk gesien werden. Dit moet der Schilder in Tafereelen van veel Beelden wel in agt nemen, om de rijkheyd zijner gedagten en inventie te vertoonen. Ook en moeten de Menschbeelden geen uytgedroogde Stokvissen gelijken, noch door de geswollentheyd der Muskelen soo Knobbelig niet zijn als een sak met knollen. Om dat Goltzius hem hier in aan sijnen Grooten Hercules vergrepen had, is sijn Print, van dien tijd aan datse uytquam tot op heden, den Appel-Sak van Goltzius genoemd. {Den Appelzak van Goltzius.}

Quotation

Tot de Schilderkonst moetmen weten dat de Muskelen en Spieren, van de Grootste tot de Kleynste niet alle op het nauwkeurigst en moeten ondersogt werden, om die altijd in de naakten te vertoonen, want men valt er te ligt door in berisping, en schijnen soodanige Beelden (om dat het leven veel kleyne en twijffelagtige Muskelen heeft) ook meer Anatomische of Gevilde dan Leven Menschen of schoone naakten te zijn: Ook vertoonen haar de Muskelen in d’eene Mensch duydelijker dan inden anderen, ja in sommige zijn eenige kleyne Muskelen, heel verborgen, die wederom in andere sterk gesien werden. Dit moet der Schilder in Tafereelen van veel Beelden wel in agt nemen, om de rijkheyd zijner gedagten en inventie te vertoonen. Ook en moeten de Menschbeelden geen uytgedroogde Stokvissen gelijken, noch door de geswollentheyd der Muskelen soo Knobbelig niet zijn als een sak met knollen. Om dat Goltzius hem hier in aan sijnen Grooten Hercules vergrepen had, is sijn Print, van dien tijd aan datse uytquam tot op heden, den Appel-Sak van Goltzius genoemd. {Den Appelzak van Goltzius.}

Quotation

19. [ndr: Regel] Wann du willens bist/ etwas nach dem Leben zu zeichnen/ so stehe zwey- auch wol dreymal so weit von deme/ was du nachzeichnen wilst/ als dessen Größe ist/ und habe vor dir etliche gleiche Linien in der imagination, damit besichtige/ was du zeichnest: alsdann werden dir/ solche Vorbildungs-Linien/ dessen rechte Erkäntnis geben. Dieses ist in allem Vornehmen/ auch in nachzeichnung der Antich-Studien/ zu observiren. Hierbey aber ist zu merken/ weil die berühmteste Antichen in der Vollkommenheit all-hoch gestiegen/ daß man denen just nachfolge/ und weder davon/ noch darzu thue: dann sonst irret man sehr weit/ wie vielen Franzosen/ auch Niederländern/ oft wiederfahren/ die ihre Sachen/ mit der von ihren Lehrmeistern angenommenen eignen bösen Manier/ nach den Antichen/ gemacht; daher solche/ wann sie auf dem Papier gestanden/ des guten wenig gehabt/ sondern mehr ihrem Callot oder Perier, auch des Sprangers/ Golzius oder Rubens Manier gefolget/ oder wenigst das ansehen gehabt/ daß sie ihnen gefolget. Ist derowegen den gerechten guten Antichen/ sowol als den raresten Gemählen/ ohne änderung/ geraden Wegs nachzufolgen: weil selbige/ gleichwie die heilige Schrift/ weder Castrirung noch Zusatz leiden.

Quotation

Of Colouring and Shadowing of History in Limning, and also other Necessary Observations.


The differences between Limning Pictures to the Life, or History, are Infinite ; notwithstanding the same Colours that are used for one do also for the other. And to particularise but part of what may be well said upon this Subject, would be too tedeous, if not endless. The most Remarkable is most certainly in the Variety of Colouring of things according to their several Sexes and Ages ; and also of Invention of ordering and well Stelling. All things which are to be represented, are many times according to the Humour, Judgement, and Discretion of the Master. We see generally in the Practice of the best and most Famous Painters, that they that do follow the Life, do tie themselves strictly and precisely to follow what they see in the Life, to immitate it as near as possible ; yet in their Inventions they assume to themselves such a Gentile Liberty and Licence, both in Colouring and Ordering ; but not so far as to run into those Extremes as
Bartholomæus Spranger, Henry Goltzius, Abraham Blomart, and Outeawale, and several other Dutch Painters, run into about the Year 1588 ; for their Inventions at that time and Actions were so extravagantly strain’d and stretch to that degree beyond Nature, that made their Works seem to the Judicious Eye very Ridiculous, and contrary to Nature ; and at that time it was grown to such an Imposture or Mode, that he was counted no Master that could not strain his Actions in that extravagant manner. Which Mode was afterwards laid aside, and the Works that those Masters afterwards made were incomparably Good, by their Embracing more the Ancient Italian way of DESIGNING, which was more Modest, Gentile, and Graceful. So far they abused the Modest Licence, that so Graced the Admirable Works of Titian, Michael Angelo, and most of the Eminent Italians of that Age. And others have been as Extravagant in their Colouring. Which two Extremes may be both avoided by imitating that Divine Titian for Colouring, who was of all others esteemed the best.

Quotation

Of Colouring and Shadowing of History in Limning, and also other Necessary Observations.


The differences between Limning Pictures to the Life, or History, are Infinite ; notwithstanding the same Colours that are used for one do also for the other. And to particularise but part of what may be well said upon this Subject, would be too tedeous, if not endless. The most Remarkable is most certainly in the Variety of Colouring of things according to their several Sexes and Ages ; and also of Invention of ordering and well Stelling. All things which are to be represented, are many times according to the Humour, Judgement, and Discretion of the Master. We see generally in the Practice of the best and most Famous Painters, that they that do follow the Life, do tie themselves strictly and precisely to follow what they see in the Life, to immitate it as near as possible ; yet in their Inventions they assume to themselves such a Gentile Liberty and Licence, both in Colouring and Ordering ; but not so far as to run into those Extremes as
Bartholomæus Spranger, Henry Goltzius, Abraham Blomart, and Outeawale, and several other Dutch Painters, run into about the Year 1588 ; for their Inventions at that time and Actions were so extravagantly strain’d and stretch to that degree beyond Nature, that made their Works seem to the Judicious Eye very Ridiculous, and contrary to Nature ; and at that time it was grown to such an Imposture or Mode, that he was counted no Master that could not strain his Actions in that extravagant manner. Which Mode was afterwards laid aside, and the Works that those Masters afterwards made were incomparably Good, by their Embracing more the Ancient Italian way of DESIGNING, which was more Modest, Gentile, and Graceful. So far they abused the Modest Licence, that so Graced the Admirable Works of Titian, Michael Angelo, and most of the Eminent Italians of that Age. And others have been as Extravagant in their Colouring. Which two Extremes may be both avoided by imitating that Divine Titian for Colouring, who was of all others esteemed the best.

Quotation

The foundation of Proportion consists in severall particular figures, by which I would have you enter your Drawings ; as the Circle, Ovall, Square, Trangle, Cilinder : Each of these have their effects. […].
{How to draw by Copyes.} Begin your Example, by a Copie
or Print, of those severall forms of figures ; as the Sun, full-Moon, […].
{Of severall members of the body.} Then, practise by severall members of the body ; in some
Print ; as the Eare, Eye, […].
{Head and shoulders.} The next is by a
Print, or Copy of a Head and shoulders of a Man or Woman, […]. [...] {The best Prints.} The best Prints, for true proportion ; take Raphael or other old Artizans well graven.
Coltius, (a Hollander of Harlem,) varies his postures, very much ; […].

Quotation

Tot de Schilderkonst moetmen weten dat de Muskelen en Spieren, van de Grootste tot de Kleynste niet alle op het nauwkeurigst en moeten ondersogt werden, om die altijd in de naakten te vertoonen, want men valt er te ligt door in berisping, en schijnen soodanige Beelden (om dat het leven veel kleyne en twijffelagtige Muskelen heeft) ook meer Anatomische of Gevilde dan Leven Menschen of schoone naakten te zijn: Ook vertoonen haar de Muskelen in d’eene Mensch duydelijker dan inden anderen, ja in sommige zijn eenige kleyne Muskelen, heel verborgen, die wederom in andere sterk gesien werden. Dit moet der Schilder in Tafereelen van veel Beelden wel in agt nemen, om de rijkheyd zijner gedagten en inventie te vertoonen. Ook en moeten de Menschbeelden geen uytgedroogde Stokvissen gelijken, noch door de geswollentheyd der Muskelen soo Knobbelig niet zijn als een sak met knollen. Om dat Goltzius hem hier in aan sijnen Grooten Hercules vergrepen had, is sijn Print, van dien tijd aan datse uytquam tot op heden, den Appel-Sak van Goltzius genoemd. {Den Appelzak van Goltzius.}

Quotation

Generall rules for shadowing.
You must alwayes cast your shadow one way, that is, on which side of the body you begin your shadow, you must continue it till your worke be done : as if I would draw a man, I begin to shadow his left cheeke, the left part of his necke, […] leaving the other to the light, except the light side be darkned by the opposition of another body, […].
2. All circular and round bodies that receive a concentration of the light, […] must be shadowed in circular manner as thus : [ndr: insertion d’un dessin explicatif dans le corps du texte].
3. All perfect lights doe receive no shadow at all, therefore hee did absurdly, that in the transfiguration of our Saviour in the Mount, gave not his garments a deepe shadow, but also thinking to shew great Art, hee gave the beames of the light it selfe a deeper, both which ought to have beene most glorious, and all meanes used for their lustre and brightnesse; which hath beene excellently well observed of
Stradane and Goltzius.
4. Where contrary shadowes concurre and strive […] let the neerest and most solide body be first served. […].
5. It will seeme a hard matter to shadow a gemme or well pointed Diamond, […] : but if you observe the rules of the light which I shall give you, you shall easily doe it without difficultie.
6. All shadowes participate in the
medium according to the greatnesse or weakenesse of the light.
7. No body betweene the light, and our sight can effect an absolute darkenesse, wherefore I said a shadow was but a diminution of the light, and it is a great question whether there be any darknesse in the world or not.

Quotation

Tot de Schilderkonst moetmen weten dat de Muskelen en Spieren, van de Grootste tot de Kleynste niet alle op het nauwkeurigst en moeten ondersogt werden, om die altijd in de naakten te vertoonen, want men valt er te ligt door in berisping, en schijnen soodanige Beelden (om dat het leven veel kleyne en twijffelagtige Muskelen heeft) ook meer Anatomische of Gevilde dan Leven Menschen of schoone naakten te zijn: Ook vertoonen haar de Muskelen in d’eene Mensch duydelijker dan inden anderen, ja in sommige zijn eenige kleyne Muskelen, heel verborgen, die wederom in andere sterk gesien werden. Dit moet der Schilder in Tafereelen van veel Beelden wel in agt nemen, om de rijkheyd zijner gedagten en inventie te vertoonen. Ook en moeten de Menschbeelden geen uytgedroogde Stokvissen gelijken, noch door de geswollentheyd der Muskelen soo Knobbelig niet zijn als een sak met knollen. Om dat Goltzius hem hier in aan sijnen Grooten Hercules vergrepen had, is sijn Print, van dien tijd aan datse uytquam tot op heden, den Appel-Sak van Goltzius genoemd. {Den Appelzak van Goltzius.}

Quotation

Des différentes manieres de Graver.
Il y en a qui montrent une grande facilité de Burin, les autres ont une maniere fatiguée ; on en voit qui affectent de croiser leurs tailles fort en lozange, & d’autres les font toutes quarrées. Ces manieres faciles dont j’entends parler, sont celles de Goltzius, Muller, Lucas Kilian, Mellan, & quelques autres, qui semblent en plusieurs recontres ne s’être attachés qu’à faire voir par un tournoyement de tailles, qu’ils étoient maîtres de leur Burin, sans se mettre en peine de la justesse des contours, des expressions, ni de l’effet de clair-obscur qui se trouve dans les desseins & les Tableaux que l’on veut représenter.
Celles que je trouve fatiguées le sont par une infinité de traits et de points confondus les uns dans les autres & sans aucun ordre, qui ressemblent plutôt à un dessein qu’à de la gravûre.
Il ne faut jamais croiser les tailles trop lozanges particulierement dans les chairs, parce qu’elles forment des angles aigus, qui font une piece de treillis tabizé fort désagréable, ce qui ôte à la vûe le repros qu’elle souhaite sur toute sorte d’ouvrages.
On ne doit croiser les tailles si fort en lozange que dans quelques nuages, dans des tempêtes, pour représenter les vagues de la mer, dans les peaux des animaux velus, & cela fait aussi fort bien dans les feuilles des arbres.
La maniere entre quarré & lozange est me semble plus utile & plus agréable aux yeux : aussi est-elle plus difficile à cause que l’inégalité des traits [p. 107 160] s’en remarque davantage, & quand je dis de faire entre les deux, je ne dis point de faire tout à fait quarré, parce que cela tient trop de la pierre.

Quotation

Well Designed.
           
[…] ; there must be truth in every part, and
Proportion of the figure, just and Naturall with the Life. Some artizans, strain Limbs into extreams. Albert Durar, Golties, Spranger, did so, in that which was ; and Michael Angelo, in that which should be ; and thereby in truth, loose the gracefulness.
{Of Factions.} But then, if an Artizan adventure on a
Fiction, it will appeare lesse pleasing, unless it be done boldly ; not only to exceed the worke, (but also the possibility) of Nature ; […].
{Difference of Naturall and feigned Figures.} The
Naturall figures indeed, shew property and decencie to delight common Judgement ; and the forced figures, may be the sign of the Novelty in expression, and pleasing the Excitation of the mind ; for Novelty causeth admiration, and admiration enforces curiosity, the delightfull appetite of the mind.
And certainely from an Artizan’s excellencies, proceed those extravagant varieties, or admirable Novelties, which are not the issues of an idle brain, or to be found within the compass of a narrow conception ; but please the Eyes, like new straines of Musick to the Eares, when common ayres become insipid.
{And with Grace.}
Grace, is the bold and free disposing of the hand in the whole draught of the designe. […].

Quotation

19. [ndr: Regel] Wann du willens bist/ etwas nach dem Leben zu zeichnen/ so stehe zwey- auch wol dreymal so weit von deme/ was du nachzeichnen wilst/ als dessen Größe ist/ und habe vor dir etliche gleiche Linien in der imagination, damit besichtige/ was du zeichnest: alsdann werden dir/ solche Vorbildungs-Linien/ dessen rechte Erkäntnis geben. Dieses ist in allem Vornehmen/ auch in nachzeichnung der Antich-Studien/ zu observiren. Hierbey aber ist zu merken/ weil die berühmteste Antichen in der Vollkommenheit all-hoch gestiegen/ daß man denen just nachfolge/ und weder davon/ noch darzu thue: dann sonst irret man sehr weit/ wie vielen Franzosen/ auch Niederländern/ oft wiederfahren/ die ihre Sachen/ mit der von ihren Lehrmeistern angenommenen eignen bösen Manier/ nach den Antichen/ gemacht; daher solche/ wann sie auf dem Papier gestanden/ des guten wenig gehabt/ sondern mehr ihrem Callot oder Perier, auch des Sprangers/ Golzius oder Rubens Manier gefolget/ oder wenigst das ansehen gehabt/ daß sie ihnen gefolget. Ist derowegen den gerechten guten Antichen/ sowol als den raresten Gemählen/ ohne änderung/ geraden Wegs nachzufolgen: weil selbige/ gleichwie die heilige Schrift/ weder Castrirung noch Zusatz leiden.

Quotation

Generall rules for shadowing.
You must alwayes cast your shadow one way, that is, on which side of the body you begin your shadow, you must continue it till your worke be done : as if I would draw a man, I begin to shadow his left cheeke, the left part of his necke, […] leaving the other to the light, except the light side be darkned by the opposition of another body, […].
2. All circular and round bodies that receive a concentration of the light, […] must be shadowed in circular manner as thus : [ndr: insertion d’un dessin explicatif dans le corps du texte].
3. All perfect lights doe receive no shadow at all, therefore hee did absurdly, that in the transfiguration of our Saviour in the Mount, gave not his garments a deepe shadow, but also thinking to shew great Art, hee gave the beames of the light it selfe a deeper, both which ought to have beene most glorious, and all meanes used for their lustre and brightnesse; which hath beene excellently well observed of
Stradane and Goltzius.
4. Where contrary shadowes concurre and strive […] let the neerest and most solide body be first served. […].
5. It will seeme a hard matter to shadow a gemme or well pointed Diamond, […] : but if you observe the rules of the light which I shall give you, you shall easily doe it without difficultie.
6. All shadowes participate in the
medium according to the greatnesse or weakenesse of the light.
7. No body betweene the light, and our sight can effect an absolute darkenesse, wherefore I said a shadow was but a diminution of the light, and it is a great question whether there be any darknesse in the world or not.

Quotation

Drapery (so called of the French word Drap, which is cloath) principally consisteth in the true making and folding your garment, giving to every fold his proper naturall doubling and shadow ; which is great skill, and scarce attained unto by any of our countrey and ordinary Painters : insomuch that if I would make triall of a good workeman ; I would finde him quickly by the folding of a garment, or the shadowing of a gowne, sheete, or such like.
{What Method is to bee observed in drapery}. The method now to be observed in Drapery, is to draw first the outmost or extreme lines of your garment, as you will, full of narrow, and leave wide and spare places, where you thinke you shall have need of folds ; draw your greater folds alwayes first, not letting any line touch, or directly crosse another, for then shall you bring an irrecoverable confusion into your worke : […]. I would herein above all other have you to imitate
Albert Durer, if you can get his peeces, if not Goltzius or some other.

Quotation

Een goede wetenschap hier van te hebben, gheeft ons dit voordeel, dat wy de muskelen te recht leeren kennen, waer sy beginnen, en waer sy eyndigen; hoe sy haer bewegen, ende in 't beroeren haer veranderen; hoe sy in-wicken, en waer sy wederom uyt-puylen, hoe een lichaem om een schoon proportie te hebben, dient verdeelt te wesen; sy wijst ons 'tonderscheyt tusschen Mans ende Vrouwen beelden, het verschillende de proportie van Kinderen, en volwassene. […] Leert sy ons, hoe in de ghestalte van een Mensche, altijdt een rechte perpendiculaer of loot-linie uyt te vinden is: oock een ghelijck-beenighe, en ghelijck-zijdighe dry-hoeck, een rechte vierkant, met een volkomen ronte, ende veel nutticheden meer. […] Niet te min […], wijs ick u tot de Anatomie van Meester Heynderick, en Meester Cornelis van Haerlem, welcke u gevilde pleyster-beelden, by gebreck van andere, na-gelaten hebben, waer door ghy eeniger mate tot kennisse van naecte komen sult, het gene ons ten hoochsten dienstich is, in welcke P.F. de Grebber, wel ervaren, en boven vele andere seer uytsteeckende is, door de menichfuldighe ondersoeckinge, en wonder naeuwe waerneminge, dien hy hier in gebruyct heeft, lettende op alle hoedanigheden, die hy in alle gestalte seer scherp waer neemt, hoe de selve door de beweginge veranderen, waer door hy met veel arbeydts toe geraect is; ende eenighe van sijn voornaemste jaren mede door gebracht, daer hy lichtelick door 't Anatomiseren toe geraect soude hebben, en die tijdt tot andere saecken gebruyckt hebben tot dienst van de Konst.

Quotation

Well Designed.
           
[…] ; there must be truth in every part, and
Proportion of the figure, just and Naturall with the Life. Some artizans, strain Limbs into extreams. Albert Durar, Golties, Spranger, did so, in that which was ; and Michael Angelo, in that which should be ; and thereby in truth, loose the gracefulness.
{Of Factions.} But then, if an Artizan adventure on a
Fiction, it will appeare lesse pleasing, unless it be done boldly ; not only to exceed the worke, (but also the possibility) of Nature ; […].
{Difference of Naturall and feigned Figures.} The
Naturall figures indeed, shew property and decencie to delight common Judgement ; and the forced figures, may be the sign of the Novelty in expression, and pleasing the Excitation of the mind ; for Novelty causeth admiration, and admiration enforces curiosity, the delightfull appetite of the mind.
And certainely from an Artizan’s excellencies, proceed those extravagant varieties, or admirable Novelties, which are not the issues of an idle brain, or to be found within the compass of a narrow conception ; but please the Eyes, like new straines of Musick to the Eares, when common ayres become insipid.
{And with Grace.}
Grace, is the bold and free disposing of the hand in the whole draught of the designe. […].

Quotation

The foundation of Proportion consists in severall particular figures, by which I would have you enter your Drawings ; as the Circle, Ovall, Square, Trangle, Cilinder : Each of these have their effects. […].
{How to draw by Copyes.} Begin your Example, by a Copie
or Print, of those severall forms of figures ; as the Sun, full-Moon, […].
{Of severall members of the body.} Then, practise by severall members of the body ; in some
Print ; as the Eare, Eye, […].
{Head and shoulders.} The next is by a
Print, or Copy of a Head and shoulders of a Man or Woman, […]. [...] {The best Prints.} The best Prints, for true proportion ; take Raphael or other old Artizans well graven.
Coltius, (a Hollander of Harlem,) varies his postures, very much ; […].

Quotation

The Art of Etching.
The Grounds and Rules of Etching.


Before that you begin to
Etch upon copper, it is very necessary to practise the Art of Drawing, till you be able if need require to draw any head after the life, or to draw a design, for it you intend to practice the Art of Etching, you will find it very profitable to draw after good prints, which are well designed, and graved, and when you have practised so long that you are able to coppy any print, or drawing very exactly ; then draw after good Heads of plaister or figures, according to your own fancy, which will learn you to shadow according to Art, if well observed, therefore be sure when you draw after plaister, to observe very exactly to take the true outlines or circumferences, and then take notice how the shadow falls, then shadow it very faint and soft, where need requires. The prints which I recommend unto you as absolutely the best to learn to Etch or Grave after, be the prints of Henry Goldshis and Hermon Muller, therefore it is very convenient to leaan to hatch with the Pen exactly after  either of the aforesaid prints of Goldshis or Muller, and when you have brought it to that perfection ; and can draw very well after plaister, you may practise to draw after the life ; but before you draw after the life, you must be very exact and true in your outlines or circumferences.

Quotation

Of Colouring and Shadowing of History in Limning, and also other Necessary Observations.


The differences between Limning Pictures to the Life, or History, are Infinite ; notwithstanding the same Colours that are used for one do also for the other. And to particularise but part of what may be well said upon this Subject, would be too tedeous, if not endless. The most Remarkable is most certainly in the Variety of Colouring of things according to their several Sexes and Ages ; and also of Invention of ordering and well Stelling. All things which are to be represented, are many times according to the Humour, Judgement, and Discretion of the Master. We see generally in the Practice of the best and most Famous Painters, that they that do follow the Life, do tie themselves strictly and precisely to follow what they see in the Life, to immitate it as near as possible ; yet in their Inventions they assume to themselves such a Gentile Liberty and Licence, both in Colouring and Ordering ; but not so far as to run into those Extremes as
Bartholomæus Spranger, Henry Goltzius, Abraham Blomart, and Outeawale, and several other Dutch Painters, run into about the Year 1588 ; for their Inventions at that time and Actions were so extravagantly strain’d and stretch to that degree beyond Nature, that made their Works seem to the Judicious Eye very Ridiculous, and contrary to Nature ; and at that time it was grown to such an Imposture or Mode, that he was counted no Master that could not strain his Actions in that extravagant manner. Which Mode was afterwards laid aside, and the Works that those Masters afterwards made were incomparably Good, by their Embracing more the Ancient Italian way of DESIGNING, which was more Modest, Gentile, and Graceful. So far they abused the Modest Licence, that so Graced the Admirable Works of Titian, Michael Angelo, and most of the Eminent Italians of that Age. And others have been as Extravagant in their Colouring. Which two Extremes may be both avoided by imitating that Divine Titian for Colouring, who was of all others esteemed the best.

Quotation

19. [ndr: Regel] Wann du willens bist/ etwas nach dem Leben zu zeichnen/ so stehe zwey- auch wol dreymal so weit von deme/ was du nachzeichnen wilst/ als dessen Größe ist/ und habe vor dir etliche gleiche Linien in der imagination, damit besichtige/ was du zeichnest: alsdann werden dir/ solche Vorbildungs-Linien/ dessen rechte Erkäntnis geben. Dieses ist in allem Vornehmen/ auch in nachzeichnung der Antich-Studien/ zu observiren. Hierbey aber ist zu merken/ weil die berühmteste Antichen in der Vollkommenheit all-hoch gestiegen/ daß man denen just nachfolge/ und weder davon/ noch darzu thue: dann sonst irret man sehr weit/ wie vielen Franzosen/ auch Niederländern/ oft wiederfahren/ die ihre Sachen/ mit der von ihren Lehrmeistern angenommenen eignen bösen Manier/ nach den Antichen/ gemacht; daher solche/ wann sie auf dem Papier gestanden/ des guten wenig gehabt/ sondern mehr ihrem Callot oder Perier, auch des Sprangers/ Golzius oder Rubens Manier gefolget/ oder wenigst das ansehen gehabt/ daß sie ihnen gefolget. Ist derowegen den gerechten guten Antichen/ sowol als den raresten Gemählen/ ohne änderung/ geraden Wegs nachzufolgen: weil selbige/ gleichwie die heilige Schrift/ weder Castrirung noch Zusatz leiden.

Quotation

Tot de Schilderkonst moetmen weten dat de Muskelen en Spieren, van de Grootste tot de Kleynste niet alle op het nauwkeurigst en moeten ondersogt werden, om die altijd in de naakten te vertoonen, want men valt er te ligt door in berisping, en schijnen soodanige Beelden (om dat het leven veel kleyne en twijffelagtige Muskelen heeft) ook meer Anatomische of Gevilde dan Leven Menschen of schoone naakten te zijn: Ook vertoonen haar de Muskelen in d’eene Mensch duydelijker dan inden anderen, ja in sommige zijn eenige kleyne Muskelen, heel verborgen, die wederom in andere sterk gesien werden. Dit moet der Schilder in Tafereelen van veel Beelden wel in agt nemen, om de rijkheyd zijner gedagten en inventie te vertoonen. Ook en moeten de Menschbeelden geen uytgedroogde Stokvissen gelijken, noch door de geswollentheyd der Muskelen soo Knobbelig niet zijn als een sak met knollen. Om dat Goltzius hem hier in aan sijnen Grooten Hercules vergrepen had, is sijn Print, van dien tijd aan datse uytquam tot op heden, den Appel-Sak van Goltzius genoemd. {Den Appelzak van Goltzius.}

Quotation

Et qu’appelez-vous bien graver, reprit Damon ? Est-ce couper le cuivre hardiment comme Goltius, ou poliment comme Bloëmart & Natalis ?
Ce n’est pas cela précisément, repliqua Pamphile, la premiere façon que vous attribuez à Goltius n’y est pas mesme fort propre ; puisque pour bien graver, il ne faut pas, s’il est possible, que le Graveur se fasse reconnoistre dans son Ouvrage : il doit simplement faire en sorte que l’Estampe gravée fasse le mesme effet (à la Couleur prés) que le Tableau qu’on se propose d’imiter.
Tous les Graveurs, dit Damon, ne font-ils pas cela ?
Non vrayement, repartit Pamphile, & il y en a peu qui le sachent faire, lors principalement qu’ils ont à graver un Tableau bien Colorié & bien entendu de Lumieres & d’Ombres. Ils en imitent les figures comme si elles estoient de Sculpture, & comme d'une même Couleur. Cependant les oppositions qui se trouvent dans les Tableaux par les differens tons de Couleurs, contribuant extrêmement à leur donner de la force, il n'est pas étonnant que leurs Estampes paroissent fades, & si bien loin de donner de l’estime pour les Originaux, elles ne servent qu'à les deshonorer. Ce n'est pas qu'il soit toûjours necessaire d'imiter les corps des Couleurs par les degrez du clair-obscur ; mais il se trouve souvent des occasions où il le faut faire indispensablement. Pour les manieres polies que vous attribuez à Bloëmart & à Natalis, elles sont sans contredit les plus agréables, quand les choses, dont je viens de vous parler, s'y rencontrent. Mais parmy toutes les Estampes où l’on voit ce bel artifice du clair-obscur, celles qui ont été gravées d’aprés les œuvres de Rubens, me semblent d’une beauté incomparable.

Quotation

Des différentes manieres de Graver.
Il y en a qui montrent une grande facilité de Burin, les autres ont une maniere fatiguée ; on en voit qui affectent de croiser leurs tailles fort en lozange, & d’autres les font toutes quarrées. Ces manieres faciles dont j’entends parler, sont celles de Goltzius, Muller, Lucas Kilian, Mellan, & quelques autres, qui semblent en plusieurs recontres ne s’être attachés qu’à faire voir par un tournoyement de tailles, qu’ils étoient maîtres de leur Burin, sans se mettre en peine de la justesse des contours, des expressions, ni de l’effet de clair-obscur qui se trouve dans les desseins & les Tableaux que l’on veut représenter.
Celles que je trouve fatiguées le sont par une infinité de traits et de points confondus les uns dans les autres & sans aucun ordre, qui ressemblent plutôt à un dessein qu’à de la gravûre.
Il ne faut jamais croiser les tailles trop lozanges particulierement dans les chairs, parce qu’elles forment des angles aigus, qui font une piece de treillis tabizé fort désagréable, ce qui ôte à la vûe le repros qu’elle souhaite sur toute sorte d’ouvrages.
On ne doit croiser les tailles si fort en lozange que dans quelques nuages, dans des tempêtes, pour représenter les vagues de la mer, dans les peaux des animaux velus, & cela fait aussi fort bien dans les feuilles des arbres.
La maniere entre quarré & lozange est me semble plus utile & plus agréable aux yeux : aussi est-elle plus difficile à cause que l’inégalité des traits [p. 107 160] s’en remarque davantage, & quand je dis de faire entre les deux, je ne dis point de faire tout à fait quarré, parce que cela tient trop de la pierre.

Quotation

Des différentes manieres de Graver.
Il y en a qui montrent une grande facilité de Burin, les autres ont une maniere fatiguée ; on en voit qui affectent de croiser leurs tailles fort en lozange, & d’autres les font toutes quarrées. Ces manieres faciles dont j’entends parler, sont celles de Goltzius, Muller, Lucas Kilian, Mellan, & quelques autres, qui semblent en plusieurs recontres ne s’être attachés qu’à faire voir par un tournoyement de tailles, qu’ils étoient maîtres de leur Burin, sans se mettre en peine de la justesse des contours, des expressions, ni de l’effet de clair-obscur qui se trouve dans les desseins & les Tableaux que l’on veut représenter.
Celles que je trouve fatiguées le sont par une infinité de traits et de points confondus les uns dans les autres & sans aucun ordre, qui ressemblent plutôt à un dessein qu’à de la gravûre.
Il ne faut jamais croiser les tailles trop lozanges particulierement dans les chairs, parce qu’elles forment des angles aigus, qui font une piece de treillis tabizé fort désagréable, ce qui ôte à la vûe le repros qu’elle souhaite sur toute sorte d’ouvrages.
On ne doit croiser les tailles si fort en lozange que dans quelques nuages, dans des tempêtes, pour représenter les vagues de la mer, dans les peaux des animaux velus, & cela fait aussi fort bien dans les feuilles des arbres.
La maniere entre quarré & lozange est me semble plus utile & plus agréable aux yeux : aussi est-elle plus difficile à cause que l’inégalité des traits [p. 107 160] s’en remarque davantage, & quand je dis de faire entre les deux, je ne dis point de faire tout à fait quarré, parce que cela tient trop de la pierre.

Quotation

Des différentes manieres de Graver.
Il y en a qui montrent une grande facilité de Burin, les autres ont une maniere fatiguée ; on en voit qui affectent de croiser leurs tailles fort en lozange, & d’autres les font toutes quarrées. Ces manieres faciles dont j’entends parler, sont celles de Goltzius, Muller, Lucas Kilian, Mellan, & quelques autres, qui semblent en plusieurs recontres ne s’être attachés qu’à faire voir par un tournoyement de tailles, qu’ils étoient maîtres de leur Burin, sans se mettre en peine de la justesse des contours, des expressions, ni de l’effet de clair-obscur qui se trouve dans les desseins & les Tableaux que l’on veut représenter.
Celles que je trouve fatiguées le sont par une infinité de traits et de points confondus les uns dans les autres & sans aucun ordre, qui ressemblent plutôt à un dessein qu’à de la gravûre.
Il ne faut jamais croiser les tailles trop lozanges particulierement dans les chairs, parce qu’elles forment des angles aigus, qui font une piece de treillis tabizé fort désagréable, ce qui ôte à la vûe le repros qu’elle souhaite sur toute sorte d’ouvrages.
On ne doit croiser les tailles si fort en lozange que dans quelques nuages, dans des tempêtes, pour représenter les vagues de la mer, dans les peaux des animaux velus, & cela fait aussi fort bien dans les feuilles des arbres.
La maniere entre quarré & lozange est me semble plus utile & plus agréable aux yeux : aussi est-elle plus difficile à cause que l’inégalité des traits [p. 107 160] s’en remarque davantage, & quand je dis de faire entre les deux, je ne dis point de faire tout à fait quarré, parce que cela tient trop de la pierre.