FOLD

FOLD (n.)

FALTE (deu.) · KREUKELING (nld.) · PLI (fra.) · PLOOI (nld.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
PLI (fra.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
PLI (fra.)
REINEKE, Anika, RÔHL, Anne, KAPUSTKA, Mateusz et WEDDIGEN, Tristan, Textile Terms: A Glossary, Berlin, Gebr. Mann Verlag, 2017.

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

4 sources
4 quotations

Quotation

Drapery (so called of the French word Drap, which is cloath) principally consisteth in the true making and folding your garment, giving to every fold his proper naturall doubling and shadow ; which is great skill, and scarce attained unto by any of our countrey and ordinary Painters : insomuch that if I would make triall of a good workeman ; I would finde him quickly by the folding of a garment, or the shadowing of a gowne, sheete, or such like.
{What Method is to bee observed in drapery}. The method now to be observed in Drapery, is to draw first the outmost or extreme lines of your garment, as you will, full of narrow, and leave wide and spare places, where you thinke you shall have need of folds ; draw your greater folds alwayes first, not letting any line touch, or directly crosse another, for then shall you bring an irrecoverable confusion into your worke : […]. I would herein above all other have you to imitate
Albert Durer, if you can get his peeces, if not Goltzius or some other.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

Then learn all manner of Drapery, that is, to give garments, and all manner of stuffes, cloth, silk, and linnen their naturall and proper folds; which at the first will seem strange and difficult unto you, but by imitating the choisest prints and pieces of the most judicious Masters, with your own observance, you will very easily attain the skill.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
L’ARTISTE → apprentissage

Quotation

Of the Motions of all sorts of Cloth.


The
Motions of Cloth, that as the Folds or Plaits ought to runne out every way like boughs from the Stemme and Body of the Tree : and must be so made that one Plait rise from another, as one bough, or one stream of Water issueth out from another, in such wise, that there be no part of the Cloth wherein there appear not some of these motions ; now these motions would be moderate, gentle and free, without any interruptions, more to be admired for their grace and facility, then for affected pains and industry, and because all sorts of Cloth have their motions, as well as Bodies, it must needs be that they differ between themselves, according to the differences of the clothes themselves.
Wherefore, they must be more light in fine
Cloth, as Sarcenet, Linnen, Cypress, &c. in which the Plaits are small, raised up, trembling, […] ; gross and dul shadows are found in stiff cloths, where the Plaits are few and gross, so that they are capable but of flow motion, […].
Temperate
motions, which are neither too gross, nor too slight, are such as appear in the folds of stuff and other cloths of Fine wool, […]. And hence have Raphael, Michael Angelo, Leonard, Gaudentius, Albertus Durcrus, and other Famous Masters in Drapery, taken the method and way of giving the true motions unto garments, as from the most perfect pattern for their general use in making the mantells of the Saints, Pavilions or Tents, which are made with this kind of Drapery, besides these, there are also other kinds of motions called turnings and crossings, which are proper unto Damasks, Taffataes, Sattins, Cloth of gold &c : in which appeare folds crossing and breaking each other, by the divers Vertue of the Drapery.
Whence the
Venetians have taken their manner of Drapery, who make their folds much different from the said motions of Raphael and the rest, which indeed ought not to be used any where save in counterfeits by the life, where it seems they are not onlye tolerable, but also very requisite ;

pleat

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → lumière

Quotation

The Draperies must have broad Masses of Light, and Shadow, and noble large Folds to give a Greatness ; and These artfully subdivised, add Grace. As in that Admirable Figure of S. Paul Preaching, of which I have already spoken, the Drapery would have had a Greatness if that whole Broad Light had been kept, and that part which is flung over his Shoulder, and hangs down his Back had been omitted ; but That adds also a Grace.

term translated by PLI in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 155-156.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → grandeur et noblesse