FIGURE

FIGURE (n.)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTUREcomposition
GENRES PICTURAUXportrait
MANIÈRE ET STYLEécole · le faire et la main
BEELD (nld.) · BILD (deu.) · BOOTS (nld.) · ENKEL BEELD (nld.) · FIGUR (deu.) · FIGURA (ita.) · FIGURE (fra.) · FIGUUR (nld.) · KUNSTBEELD (nld.) · MENSBEELD (nld.) · PERSONAGE (nld.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
FIGURE (fra.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
FIGURE (fra.)

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

6 sources
16 quotations

Quotation

Well Designed.
           
[…] ; there must be truth in every part, and
Proportion of the figure, just and Naturall with the Life. Some artizans, strain Limbs into extreams. Albert Durar, Golties, Spranger, did so, in that which was ; and Michael Angelo, in that which should be ; and thereby in truth, loose the gracefulness.
{Of Factions.} But then, if an Artizan adventure on a
Fiction, it will appeare lesse pleasing, unless it be done boldly ; not only to exceed the worke, (but also the possibility) of Nature ; […].
{Difference of Naturall and feigned Figures.} The
Naturall figures indeed, shew property and decencie to delight common Judgement ; and the forced figures, may be the sign of the Novelty in expression, and pleasing the Excitation of the mind ; for Novelty causeth admiration, and admiration enforces curiosity, the delightfull appetite of the mind.
And certainely from an Artizan’s excellencies, proceed those extravagant varieties, or admirable Novelties, which are not the issues of an idle brain, or to be found within the compass of a narrow conception ; but please the Eyes, like new straines of Musick to the Eares, when common ayres become insipid.
{And with Grace.}
Grace, is the bold and free disposing of the hand in the whole draught of the designe. […].

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité du dessin

Quotation

Of the disposition of the Parts.
{5. Of Disposition.} A Picture of many
figures, must needs express some Historicall part in it ; Every figure ought to represent therein, by a speechless discourse, the connexion in them. Assigne therefore the principall place, to the principall figures, next to hand ; Other figures, farther off. Finish the Principal figures, whilst your Spirits are fresh. {In order to perfection,} Frame not your Historicall Piece, rude, loose, and scattered, but rather, in an equitable roundness of composition ; to be perceived by each observer ; to be liked of the most, but to be judged, only, by the learned. Neglects in disposition, are soon discovered.
{Soon discovered.} Pourtray in your excellent
Pieces, not only the dainty Lineaments of Beauty, but shadow round about, rude thickers, rocks ; and so it yields more grace to the Picture, and sets it out : this discord (as in musicke) makes a comely concordance ; a disorderly order of counterfeit rudeness, pleaseth : so much grace, doe mean and ordinary things, receive from a good and orderly connexion.
{But altogether excellent.} All these together, make that perspicuous
disposiiton in a Piece of History ; and is the effectuall expression in Posture and Action ; the very Passion of each Figure ; the Soul of the PICTURE ; the Grace and Ayr of the Piece ; or the sweet Consent of all manner of perfections heaped together, in one Picture.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → expression des passions

Quotation

Some further Observations in drawing a Naked Figure, standing Foreright, by the Life.


In my Opinion, to understand how to make choice of a good
Naked, and to draw it well, is one of the most Difficult Studies in Painting, because it cannot be done well without the understanding of Anatomy. Being then desirous to draw a Naked Figure, you must strike a Line Perpendicular as long you would have the Figure to be, then you divide that Line into so many Divisions or Parts as you design the Proportion […]. And since Nature, that Cunning Work-Mistress, is so extremely Various in her Representations, the Painter is not bound to observe this Rule exactly when he draws to the life ; because all these Rules were intended for no other use then to create the Idea of such and such Proportions first in our Brain, and before they be designed in a true Symmetrical way upon Paper, and to prevent us from Designing our Figures in an Extravagant or Preposterous Proportion. […]. 
Observe (as you proceed downwards) to place all the Muscles in their right and proper places according to Nature, as you judiciously may observe in the Life, there being no certain Rules for placing and drawing the Muscles in their proper places Therefore ’tis extremely Advantageous to draw very much after the Life, and after good Prints of Anatomy, and those Statues aforementioned, and Anatomies of Plaster of Paris, which is the onely way to arrive at the perfection of Drawing a Naked Figure well ; without which never expect to be a good History Painter.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion

Quotation

Figure.
Though this word be very General, and may be taken for any painted Object ; yet it is in Painting, generally taken for Humane Figures.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → groupe

Quotation

Michael Angelo Buonaroti was the greatest Designer that ever was, having studied Naked Bodies with great Care ; but he aiming always at showing the most difficult things of the Art, in the Contorsions of Members, and Convulsions of the Muscles, Contractions of the Nerves, &c. His Painting is not so agreeable, though much more profound and difficult than any other ; his Manner was Fierce, and almost Savage, having nothing of the Graces of Raphael, whose Naked Figures are dilicate and tender, and more like Flesh and Blood, whereas Michael Angelo doth not distinguish the Sexes nor the Ages so well, but makes all alike Musculous and Strong ; and who sees one Naked Figure of his doing, may reckon he has seen them all ; his Colouring is nothing near so Natural as Raphael’s, and in a word, for all Vasari commends him above the Skies, he was a better Sculptor than a Painter : One may of Raphael and of him, that their Characters were opposite, and both great Designers ; the one endeavouring to show the Difficulties of the Art, and the other aiming at Easiness ; in which, perhaps, there is as much Difficulty.

body

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
MANIÈRE ET STYLE → école
MANIÈRE ET STYLE → le faire et la main

Quotation

There is another Caution to be observed too in this Choice of Forms, which is, to keep a Judicious Aptitude to the Story ; for if the Painter, for Example, is to draw Sampson, he must not give him the Softness and Tenderness he would give to Ganimedes ; nay, there is a difference to be made in the very same Figure at different times : and Hercules himself is to be made more Robust, fighting with Anteus, than when he sits in Dejanira’s Lap. But above all, the Painter must observe an equal Air, so as not to make one part Musculous and Strong, and the other Soft and Tender.
           
There is another thing to be considered likewise upon the viewing of any Story ; which is, whether the Painter has used that Variety which Nature herself sets us a Pattern for, in not having made any one Face exactly like another, nor hardly any one Shape or Make of either Man or Woman. Therefore the Painter must also vary his Heads, his Bodies, his Aptitudes, and in a word, all the Members of the Humane Body, or else his Piece will Cloy, and Satiate the Eye.
            As for the Remainder of what belongs properly to that part called Design ;
we must consider if every Figure moves properly ; as, if a Figure be to strike, whether the Arm and all the Body show the vigour of such a Motion ; and the same if he is to Run or Dance ; and therein consists one of the greatest Masteries of the Art, and which requires some Knowledge in Anatomy, that the Muscles be rightly express’d. As for Shortnings, they are things of great Difficulty, and few understand the Beauty of them ; which is, so to cheat the Eye, that a Figure that in reality is not a Foot in length, shall seem to be five or six Foot long ; and this depends upon Opticks, and is most in use in Ceilings and Vaults.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → action et attitude
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion

Quotation

Chap. IV, Of the first Practice of Drawing.
SECT. I.
Of Geometrical Figures.
Being provided of all necessary Instruments for Drawing, proceed to Practice ; and first begin with plain Geometrical figures, such as the
Circle, Oval, Square, Triangle, Cone, Cylinder ; all which your Rule and Compasses will help you in : but first endeavour to draw them by hand, which with a little practice you may attain. I have my self, by taking a Black-lead Pencil in my hand, and holding it as I do a Pen, and restling the end of my little finder upon my paper, turning the paper about with my left hand, and have described a Circle so exact, that a pair of Compasses could not discover an errour : I say, practice the making and drawing of these by hand, for they are all useful in one kind or other. […].


SECT. II.
Of the second practice of Drawing.
Having practised these Figures, proceed to the drawing of
Cherries, Pears, Apples, Apricocks, Peaches, Grapes, Strawberries, Peascods, Butterflies, and such like.


SECT. III.
Of the third Practice.
Imitate
Flowers, as Roses, Tulips, Carnations, &c. Also Beasts, […]. Then practice Birds, […]. Then Fishes, […]. Of all which there are Books to be bought at very reasonable rates.


SECT. IV.
Of the fourth Practice.
Imitate the Body and Parts of the Body of Man ; in the practice whereof beware of the common errors usually committed, as of drawing the Head too big for the Body, and others the like ; which to prevent, you have here presented to your view the
Heads, Noses, Mouths, Hands, Arms, Feet, Legs, Bodies ; also whole Figures of Men, Women, and Children in several postures, being Copies of the best Masters extant, with Rules and Directions for Drawing every particuler member of the Body, and that I would have you now to practice, you having gone sufficiently forward with the others before noted.

ANONYME, [Bouches, planche 4], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 27 - planche 4.
ANONYME, [Bras, planche 7], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 30 - planche 7.
ANONYME, [Enfant de face et de dos, planche 11], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 37 - planche 11.
ANONYME, [Enfants dans diverses positions, planche 12], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 38 - planche 12.
ANONYME, [Femme et homme de dos, planche 14], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 40 - planche 14.
ANONYME, [Femme et homme de face, planche non numérotée], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 39.
ANONYME, [Jambes, planche 10], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 33 - planche 10.
ANONYME, [Mains, planche 5], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 28 - planche 5.
ANONYME, [Mains, planche 6], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 29 - planche 6.
ANONYME, [Oreilles et yeux, planche 3], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 26 - planche 3.
ANONYME, [Pieds, planche 9], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 32 - planche 9.
ANONYME, [Torses, planche non numérotée], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 35.
ANONYME, [Visages, planche 1], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 24 - planche 1.
ANONYME, [Visages, planche 2], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 42 - planche 2.
ANONYME, [Visages, planche non numérotée], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 43.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

Quotation

Precepts about Ordonnance and Design. As Likewise for Drawing by the Life.
In Designing a Peice of History we must have greatest Regard to the Principal
Group, that the Lights fall strongest on it, and more especially on the Cheif Figure that it be of the first Character and most Finishd, being the Eye of the work.
            That the
Group be sustain’d by something that seems loose about it, which serves to extend and continue it to some other Group by, otherwise the Diminution will be too apparent, and break to much into Heaps, and the Eye not descend naturally from one to another, which must, begining at the Principall, fall according to the Mind of the Story.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition

Quotation

But wheras in History the Figures have dependency on each other, a Figure by the Life (one Figure usually making the Picture) be only agreeable to it self,
            We must Consider (by divers Tryals) what
Position of Body, Action and Light best becoms the Person, and when any thing seems forcd or affected, we must Endeavour to divert them by Discours, &c.
[...].

Conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

but certainly all the Management in the World cannot put together a great number of Figures, and Ornaments, with that Advantage as a few.
Where the Story requires that there be a Crowd of People, there may be some Figures without any Particular Character, which are not Supernumerary, because the Story requires a Crowd. In the Cartons [ndr : les cartons de Raphaël] there are very few Idle Figures : Nor are all those such that may seem to be so ; there are two in the Carton of S.
Paul Preaching that are walking at a distance amongst the Buildings, but these serve well to intimate that there were some who like Gallio cared for none of these things.

term translated by FIGURE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 49-50.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → groupe

Quotation

There are Pictures representing not one particular Story, but the History of Philosophy, of Poetry, of Divinity, the Redemption of Mankind, and the like : Such is the School of Athens, the Parnassus, the Picture in the Vatican commonly call’d the Dispute of the Sacrament, all of Rafaelle ; and the large one of Frederico Zuccaro of the Annunciation, and God the Father, with a Heaven, the Prophets, &c. Such Compositions as These being of a different nature are not subject to the same Rules with Common Historical Pictures ; but Here must be Principal, and Subordonate Figures, and Actions ; As the Plato and Aristotle in the School of Athens, the Apollo in the Parnassus, &c.
Now I have mention’d this Design, I cannot pass it over without going a little out of my way to observe some Particulars of that Admirable Group of the three Poets,
Homer, Virgil, and Dante ; […].
The Figure of
Homer is an admirably one, and manag’d with great propriety ; He is Group’d with others, but is nevertheless alone :

term translated by FIGURE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 54-55.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → groupe
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition

Quotation

In all these kinds of Pictures [ndr : images représentant la vie humaine, un trait de caractère d’un individu ou dont le but est de donner une leçon particulière] the Painter should avoid too great a Luxuriancy of Fancy, and Obscurity. The Figures representing any Virtue, Vice, or other Quality, should have such Insignia as are authoriz’d by Antiquity, and Custom ; or if any be necessarily of his Own Invention, his Meaning should be apparent. […]. There are fine Examples of these in the Palace of Chigi, or the little Farnese in Rome ; Rafaëlle has there painted the Fable of Cupid and Psyche, and intermix’d little Loves with the Spoils of all the Gods ; and lastly one with a Lyon, and a Sea-Horse, which he governs as with a Bridle, to shew the Universal Empire of Love.

term translated by FIGURE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 58.

Conceptual field(s)

Quotation

The Anatomy Figures in Vesalius said to be design’d by Titian, are prettily fancied : There is a Series of denuding a Figure to the Bone, and they are all in Attitudes seeming to have most Pain as the Operation goes on, till at last they Languish, and Dye : But Michelangelo has made Anatomy Figures whose Faces and Actions are impossible to be describ’d, and the most delicate that can be imagin’d for the purpose.

term translated by FIGURE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 66.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

Quotation

I will add but one way of Expression more, and that is, plain Writing.
Polygnotos, in the Paintings made by him in the Temple of Delphos, wrote the Names of those whom he represented.
The old
Italian, and German Masters improv’d upon this ; the Figures they made were Speaking Figures, they had Labels coming out of their Mouths with that written in them which they were intended to be made to say ; but even Rafaëlle, and Annibale Carracci, have condescended to Write rather than leave any Ambiguity, or Obscurity in their Work : Thus the Name of Sappho is written to shew ‘twas She, and not one of the Muses intended in the Parnassus : And in the Gallery Farnese, that Anchises might not be mistaken for Adonis, Genus unde Latinum was written.

term translated by FIGURE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 89-90.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

In a Figure, and every part of a Figure, and indeed in every thing else there is One part which must have a peculiar Force, and be manifestly distinguish’d from the rest, all the Other parts of Which must also have a due Subordination to It, and to One Another. The same must be observ’d in the Composition of an entire Picture ; And this Principal, Distinguis’d part ought (Generally speaking) to be the Place of the Principal Figure, and Action : And Here every thing must be higher Finish’d, the Other parts must be Less so Gradually.
Pictures should be like Bunches of Grapes, but they must not resemble a great many single Grapes scatter’d on a Table ; there must not be many little Parts of an Equal Strength, and detach’d from one another, which is as odious to the Eye as ‘tis to the Ear to hear many People talking to you at once. Nothing must Start, or be too strong for the Place where it is as in a Confort of Musick when a Note is too high, or an Instrument out of Tune ; but a sweet Harmony and Repose must result from all the Parts judiciously put together, and united with each other.

term translated by FIGURE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 101-102.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

Quotation

In order to give this Just Representation of Nature […] I say in order to follow Nature exactly, a Man must be well acquainted with Nature, and have a reasonable Knowledge of Geometry, Proportion, (which must be varied according to the Sex, Age, and Quality of the Person) Anatomy, Osteology, and Perspective. I will add to these an Acquaintance with the Works of the best Painters, and Sculptors, Ancient, and Modern : For ‘tis a certain Maxim, No Man sees what things Are, that knows not what they Ought to be.
That this Maxim is true, will appear by an Academy Figure drawn by one ignorant in the Structure, and knitting of the Bones, and Anatomy, compar’d with another who understands these throughly :

term translated by FIGURE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 117-118.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → apprentissage
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps