FIALETTI, Odoardo ( 1573-1638 )

FIALETTI, Odoardo ( 1573-1638 )

ISNI:0000000118331201 Getty:500024285

Quotation

Chap. IV, Of the first Practice of Drawing.
SECT. I.
Of Geometrical Figures.
Being provided of all necessary Instruments for Drawing, proceed to Practice ; and first begin with plain Geometrical figures, such as the
Circle, Oval, Square, Triangle, Cone, Cylinder ; all which your Rule and Compasses will help you in : but first endeavour to draw them by hand, which with a little practice you may attain. I have my self, by taking a Black-lead Pencil in my hand, and holding it as I do a Pen, and restling the end of my little finder upon my paper, turning the paper about with my left hand, and have described a Circle so exact, that a pair of Compasses could not discover an errour : I say, practice the making and drawing of these by hand, for they are all useful in one kind or other. […].


SECT. II.
Of the second practice of Drawing.
Having practised these Figures, proceed to the drawing of
Cherries, Pears, Apples, Apricocks, Peaches, Grapes, Strawberries, Peascods, Butterflies, and such like.


SECT. III.
Of the third Practice.
Imitate
Flowers, as Roses, Tulips, Carnations, &c. Also Beasts, […]. Then practice Birds, […]. Then Fishes, […]. Of all which there are Books to be bought at very reasonable rates.


SECT. IV.
Of the fourth Practice.
Imitate the Body and Parts of the Body of Man ; in the practice whereof beware of the common errors usually committed, as of drawing the Head too big for the Body, and others the like ; which to prevent, you have here presented to your view the
Heads, Noses, Mouths, Hands, Arms, Feet, Legs, Bodies ; also whole Figures of Men, Women, and Children in several postures, being Copies of the best Masters extant, with Rules and Directions for Drawing every particuler member of the Body, and that I would have you now to practice, you having gone sufficiently forward with the others before noted.

Quotation

Chap. V, Directions for Drawing the Body of Man or Woman.
SECT. I.
General Rules for Drawing the Face.
In Drawing the Face, observe its motion whether forward, upward, downward, or sideways, by your Eye ; touch lightly the features where the Eyes, Nose, Mouth, and Chin should stand, and then go over them more perfectly. The Circle, Squares, and Triangles that are used in a Face, serve to guide your judgment where to place the several features.
Observe dilligently the principal Muscles of a Face, these appear most in an aged man or womans face.
[…].
A smiling countenance is discerned by the Mouth, when the corners of the Mouth turn up a little.
A frowning countenance is discerned in the Fore-head, Eye-brows, bending and somewhat wrinkling about the top of the Nose,
&c.


SECT. II.
To draw a fore-right Face.
Make the form of a perfect Oval divided into three equal parts by two Lines ; […].


SECT. III.
To draw an Up-right Head.
Which is made with three Lines equal every way, either upwards, downwards, higher or lower ; and that must be divided as the former into three equal parts, as in the Example.


SECT. IV. Of the inclining and Fore-shortned Face.
This is plainly seen by the Lines, how they concord together, and you may with facility draw in their proper places, the Nose, Mouth, and other parts with a little practice, and observing diligently the Example following.
In these Forms you must be very perfect, it being a Rule that in most Faces you may have occasion to make use of : for of all the parts of Mans body the Face is the most difficult. But having got the Proportions with their Measures, you will be able (which way soever a Face turns) to form it out, whatever proportion your Face is, you are to imitate, so must your out-stroke be formed, whether long, round, fat, or lean.
Because presidents are most useful, I have here thought good to give you the forms of several Eyes more at large, by which you may with more ease know the truth of their Proportions.
As also Ears, which are exactly to be known ; and then the forms of several Noses and Mouths ; all which are taken from eminent Masters, as
Palma and others. [In the following Page.]

Quotation

Chap. IV, Of the first Practice of Drawing.
SECT. I.
Of Geometrical Figures.
Being provided of all necessary Instruments for Drawing, proceed to Practice ; and first begin with plain Geometrical figures, such as the
Circle, Oval, Square, Triangle, Cone, Cylinder ; all which your Rule and Compasses will help you in : but first endeavour to draw them by hand, which with a little practice you may attain. I have my self, by taking a Black-lead Pencil in my hand, and holding it as I do a Pen, and restling the end of my little finder upon my paper, turning the paper about with my left hand, and have described a Circle so exact, that a pair of Compasses could not discover an errour : I say, practice the making and drawing of these by hand, for they are all useful in one kind or other. […].


SECT. II.
Of the second practice of Drawing.
Having practised these Figures, proceed to the drawing of
Cherries, Pears, Apples, Apricocks, Peaches, Grapes, Strawberries, Peascods, Butterflies, and such like.


SECT. III.
Of the third Practice.
Imitate
Flowers, as Roses, Tulips, Carnations, &c. Also Beasts, […]. Then practice Birds, […]. Then Fishes, […]. Of all which there are Books to be bought at very reasonable rates.


SECT. IV.
Of the fourth Practice.
Imitate the Body and Parts of the Body of Man ; in the practice whereof beware of the common errors usually committed, as of drawing the Head too big for the Body, and others the like ; which to prevent, you have here presented to your view the
Heads, Noses, Mouths, Hands, Arms, Feet, Legs, Bodies ; also whole Figures of Men, Women, and Children in several postures, being Copies of the best Masters extant, with Rules and Directions for Drawing every particuler member of the Body, and that I would have you now to practice, you having gone sufficiently forward with the others before noted.

Quotation

Chap. V, Directions for Drawing the Body of Man or Woman.
SECT. I.
General Rules for Drawing the Face.
In Drawing the Face, observe its motion whether forward, upward, downward, or sideways, by your Eye ; touch lightly the features where the Eyes, Nose, Mouth, and Chin should stand, and then go over them more perfectly. The Circle, Squares, and Triangles that are used in a Face, serve to guide your judgment where to place the several features.
Observe dilligently the principal Muscles of a Face, these appear most in an aged man or womans face.
[…].
A smiling countenance is discerned by the Mouth, when the corners of the Mouth turn up a little.
A frowning countenance is discerned in the Fore-head, Eye-brows, bending and somewhat wrinkling about the top of the Nose,
&c.


SECT. II.
To draw a fore-right Face.
Make the form of a perfect Oval divided into three equal parts by two Lines ; […].


SECT. III.
To draw an Up-right Head.
Which is made with three Lines equal every way, either upwards, downwards, higher or lower ; and that must be divided as the former into three equal parts, as in the Example.


SECT. IV. Of the inclining and Fore-shortned Face.
This is plainly seen by the Lines, how they concord together, and you may with facility draw in their proper places, the Nose, Mouth, and other parts with a little practice, and observing diligently the Example following.
In these Forms you must be very perfect, it being a Rule that in most Faces you may have occasion to make use of : for of all the parts of Mans body the Face is the most difficult. But having got the Proportions with their Measures, you will be able (which way soever a Face turns) to form it out, whatever proportion your Face is, you are to imitate, so must your out-stroke be formed, whether long, round, fat, or lean.
Because presidents are most useful, I have here thought good to give you the forms of several Eyes more at large, by which you may with more ease know the truth of their Proportions.
As also Ears, which are exactly to be known ; and then the forms of several Noses and Mouths ; all which are taken from eminent Masters, as
Palma and others. [In the following Page.]

Quotation

Chap. IV, Of the first Practice of Drawing.
SECT. I.
Of Geometrical Figures.
Being provided of all necessary Instruments for Drawing, proceed to Practice ; and first begin with plain Geometrical figures, such as the
Circle, Oval, Square, Triangle, Cone, Cylinder ; all which your Rule and Compasses will help you in : but first endeavour to draw them by hand, which with a little practice you may attain. I have my self, by taking a Black-lead Pencil in my hand, and holding it as I do a Pen, and restling the end of my little finder upon my paper, turning the paper about with my left hand, and have described a Circle so exact, that a pair of Compasses could not discover an errour : I say, practice the making and drawing of these by hand, for they are all useful in one kind or other. […].


SECT. II.
Of the second practice of Drawing.
Having practised these Figures, proceed to the drawing of
Cherries, Pears, Apples, Apricocks, Peaches, Grapes, Strawberries, Peascods, Butterflies, and such like.


SECT. III.
Of the third Practice.
Imitate
Flowers, as Roses, Tulips, Carnations, &c. Also Beasts, […]. Then practice Birds, […]. Then Fishes, […]. Of all which there are Books to be bought at very reasonable rates.


SECT. IV.
Of the fourth Practice.
Imitate the Body and Parts of the Body of Man ; in the practice whereof beware of the common errors usually committed, as of drawing the Head too big for the Body, and others the like ; which to prevent, you have here presented to your view the
Heads, Noses, Mouths, Hands, Arms, Feet, Legs, Bodies ; also whole Figures of Men, Women, and Children in several postures, being Copies of the best Masters extant, with Rules and Directions for Drawing every particuler member of the Body, and that I would have you now to practice, you having gone sufficiently forward with the others before noted.

Quotation

Chap. V, Directions for Drawing the Body of Man or Woman.
SECT. I.
General Rules for Drawing the Face.
In Drawing the Face, observe its motion whether forward, upward, downward, or sideways, by your Eye ; touch lightly the features where the Eyes, Nose, Mouth, and Chin should stand, and then go over them more perfectly. The Circle, Squares, and Triangles that are used in a Face, serve to guide your judgment where to place the several features.
Observe dilligently the principal Muscles of a Face, these appear most in an aged man or womans face.
[…].
A smiling countenance is discerned by the Mouth, when the corners of the Mouth turn up a little.
A frowning countenance is discerned in the Fore-head, Eye-brows, bending and somewhat wrinkling about the top of the Nose,
&c.


SECT. II.
To draw a fore-right Face.
Make the form of a perfect Oval divided into three equal parts by two Lines ; […].


SECT. III.
To draw an Up-right Head.
Which is made with three Lines equal every way, either upwards, downwards, higher or lower ; and that must be divided as the former into three equal parts, as in the Example.


SECT. IV. Of the inclining and Fore-shortned Face.
This is plainly seen by the Lines, how they concord together, and you may with facility draw in their proper places, the Nose, Mouth, and other parts with a little practice, and observing diligently the Example following.
In these Forms you must be very perfect, it being a Rule that in most Faces you may have occasion to make use of : for of all the parts of Mans body the Face is the most difficult. But having got the Proportions with their Measures, you will be able (which way soever a Face turns) to form it out, whatever proportion your Face is, you are to imitate, so must your out-stroke be formed, whether long, round, fat, or lean.
Because presidents are most useful, I have here thought good to give you the forms of several Eyes more at large, by which you may with more ease know the truth of their Proportions.
As also Ears, which are exactly to be known ; and then the forms of several Noses and Mouths ; all which are taken from eminent Masters, as
Palma and others. [In the following Page.]

Quotation

Of the Head in Prophile or side-wayes.
The manner to make this
Head by just and safe rules is thus, First forme a perfect equall Triangle in what position you will, turning the Triangle to make the Face upon one of the three sides ; be it which it will,  either upwards or downwards, higer or lower {According to Odoardo Fialetti.} ; […].


Of the Foreright Face.
Being then desireous to draw the Foreright
Face, it will be necessary to Forme a perfect Ovall, […].


Of the Head in Foreshortning.
Hitherto I have treated of the
Head, both Foreright and in other Positions, but that you might know all that is needfull for the perfect understanding of this profession, it is necessary that I specifie the manner how to draw the Face by an easy, absolute and fair way ; Treating thus I propound to you Methodical means therein, because my intent is to Facilitate the matter in that manner, but without writing thereupon it may be intelligible, for a draught well made hath that power, that it makes it self understood without any discourse of the Author thereon, but I alwayes observe both the one and the other also ; I say that the foreshortning which is made onely with Fretts, Grates, Squares, or with Geometrical Instruments, breed onely a confusion of lines, which is not the best principal of expert Ingenuity, the reason whereof is, that it can hardly be measured by any Rule, unless the whole Body be framed together. Therefore I will shew an easy Rule, very like to that of the foreright Face, that is, to make a Circular draught with the aspect upwards, or downwards, as in the foreright Head, where the Traverse lines are straight, but these go Circularly, for if the Heads flye upwards the Traced strokes and the Divisions must be raised, with caution that the Eares and Eyes fall not out of their due points, as is signified in the first Place.


Of the side face without any Measure.
Being desireous to make the side
face without any Triangle or Measure, which with a little care and practice, observing the distances and Measures which will serve for Direction, because the Head and other parts of the Body ought to be proportional, and made from Measures ; it will easily follow, Framing or Traceing many, you may not only Facilitate it by the Eye and Judgement, but also accommodate the Hand, to Trace and draw, all things right, for it is true that the Eye will have its place. I having drawn certain stroaks or draughts from the life of nature, and reduced it with the Pencil into Colours, have found it come off punctually right, of a correspondent bigness to that, which I have imitated, and have not found any thing disproportioned, but have alwayes found it fall out right as I would have it, therefore I say that this Rule, and Measure which I have set down, in the Porphile or other opositions of the Head, is not any hindrance to the excellency of the Art, nor will weaken your worth, but will serve for a general Rule being once possest therewith, and also become prevalent when occasion shall require, to make a Head Ten times as big as the Life ; […].

Quotation

Chap. IV, Of the first Practice of Drawing.
SECT. I.
Of Geometrical Figures.
Being provided of all necessary Instruments for Drawing, proceed to Practice ; and first begin with plain Geometrical figures, such as the
Circle, Oval, Square, Triangle, Cone, Cylinder ; all which your Rule and Compasses will help you in : but first endeavour to draw them by hand, which with a little practice you may attain. I have my self, by taking a Black-lead Pencil in my hand, and holding it as I do a Pen, and restling the end of my little finder upon my paper, turning the paper about with my left hand, and have described a Circle so exact, that a pair of Compasses could not discover an errour : I say, practice the making and drawing of these by hand, for they are all useful in one kind or other. […].


SECT. II.
Of the second practice of Drawing.
Having practised these Figures, proceed to the drawing of
Cherries, Pears, Apples, Apricocks, Peaches, Grapes, Strawberries, Peascods, Butterflies, and such like.


SECT. III.
Of the third Practice.
Imitate
Flowers, as Roses, Tulips, Carnations, &c. Also Beasts, […]. Then practice Birds, […]. Then Fishes, […]. Of all which there are Books to be bought at very reasonable rates.


SECT. IV.
Of the fourth Practice.
Imitate the Body and Parts of the Body of Man ; in the practice whereof beware of the common errors usually committed, as of drawing the Head too big for the Body, and others the like ; which to prevent, you have here presented to your view the
Heads, Noses, Mouths, Hands, Arms, Feet, Legs, Bodies ; also whole Figures of Men, Women, and Children in several postures, being Copies of the best Masters extant, with Rules and Directions for Drawing every particuler member of the Body, and that I would have you now to practice, you having gone sufficiently forward with the others before noted.

Quotation

Of the Head in Prophile or side-wayes.
The manner to make this
Head by just and safe rules is thus, First forme a perfect equall Triangle in what position you will, turning the Triangle to make the Face upon one of the three sides ; be it which it will,  either upwards or downwards, higer or lower {According to Odoardo Fialetti.} ; […].


Of the Foreright Face.
Being then desireous to draw the Foreright
Face, it will be necessary to Forme a perfect Ovall, […].


Of the Head in Foreshortning.
Hitherto I have treated of the
Head, both Foreright and in other Positions, but that you might know all that is needfull for the perfect understanding of this profession, it is necessary that I specifie the manner how to draw the Face by an easy, absolute and fair way ; Treating thus I propound to you Methodical means therein, because my intent is to Facilitate the matter in that manner, but without writing thereupon it may be intelligible, for a draught well made hath that power, that it makes it self understood without any discourse of the Author thereon, but I alwayes observe both the one and the other also ; I say that the foreshortning which is made onely with Fretts, Grates, Squares, or with Geometrical Instruments, breed onely a confusion of lines, which is not the best principal of expert Ingenuity, the reason whereof is, that it can hardly be measured by any Rule, unless the whole Body be framed together. Therefore I will shew an easy Rule, very like to that of the foreright Face, that is, to make a Circular draught with the aspect upwards, or downwards, as in the foreright Head, where the Traverse lines are straight, but these go Circularly, for if the Heads flye upwards the Traced strokes and the Divisions must be raised, with caution that the Eares and Eyes fall not out of their due points, as is signified in the first Place.


Of the side face without any Measure.
Being desireous to make the side
face without any Triangle or Measure, which with a little care and practice, observing the distances and Measures which will serve for Direction, because the Head and other parts of the Body ought to be proportional, and made from Measures ; it will easily follow, Framing or Traceing many, you may not only Facilitate it by the Eye and Judgement, but also accommodate the Hand, to Trace and draw, all things right, for it is true that the Eye will have its place. I having drawn certain stroaks or draughts from the life of nature, and reduced it with the Pencil into Colours, have found it come off punctually right, of a correspondent bigness to that, which I have imitated, and have not found any thing disproportioned, but have alwayes found it fall out right as I would have it, therefore I say that this Rule, and Measure which I have set down, in the Porphile or other opositions of the Head, is not any hindrance to the excellency of the Art, nor will weaken your worth, but will serve for a general Rule being once possest therewith, and also become prevalent when occasion shall require, to make a Head Ten times as big as the Life ; […].