DECORUM

DECORUM (n.)

BETAMELIJKHEID (nld.) · BIENSÉANCE (fra.) · CONVENEVOLEZZA (ita.) · DECORUM (deu.) · DÉCORUM (fra.) · SITTSAMKEIT (deu.) · WELSTAND (nld.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
BIENSÉANCE (fra.) · COSTUME (fra.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
BIENSÉANCE (fra.)
BLANC, Jan, Peindre et penser la peinture au XVIIe siècle : la théorie de l'art de Samuel van Hoogstraten, Berne, Peter Lang, 2008.
DETHLEFS, Hans Joachim, Der Wohlstand der Kunst: ökonomische, sozialethische und eudämonistische Sinnperspektiven im frühneuzeitlichen Umgang mit dem Schönen, Tokyo, Chuo University Press, 2010.
DETHLEFS, Hans Joachim, « CONVENANCE », dans HECK, Michèle-Caroline (éd.), LexArt. Les mots de la peinture (France, Allemagne, Angleterre, Pays-Bas, 1600-1750) [édition anglaise, 2018], Montpellier, Presses Universitaires de la Méditerranée, 2018, p. 138-144.
DETHLEFS, Hans Joachim, « Wohlstand and Decorum in Sixteenth-Century German Art Theory », Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, 70, 2007, p. 143-155 [En ligne : http://www.jstor.org/stable/20462761 consulté le 23/06/2015].
FOWLER, Caroline O., « Presence in seventeenth-century practise and theory », Word & Image, 30, 2014, p. 155-167 [En ligne : https://www.academia.edu/18957965/Presence_in_Seventeenth-Century_Practice_and_Theory consulté le 08/04/2018].
HECK, Michèle-Caroline, Théorie et pratique de la peinture : Sandrart et la “Teutsche Academie”, Paris, Éd. de la Maison des sciences de l’homme, 2006.
HECK, Michèle-Caroline, « La lecture de l’Ecole d’Athènes par Fréart de Chambray : quand la convenance devient grille de lecture et critère de jugement », 2015 [En ligne : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01234157 consulté le 17/05/2015].
ROODENBURG, Herman, « Journal Article 'Welstand' en 'wellevendheid': Over houdingen, gebaren en gelaatsuitdrukking in de schilderkunst, de toneelkunst en de rhetorica: de inbreng van het classicisme », Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek, 46, 1995, p. 416-36 [En ligne : http://www.jstor.org/stable/43875977 consulté le 30/03/2018].

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6 quotations

Quotation

{5. Of Drapery.} The fifth [ndr : erreur fréquemment commise par le peintre] is of Drapery or attire, in not observing a decorum in garments proper to every severall condition and calling, as not giving to a King his Robes of estate, with their proper furres and linings : to religious persons an habite fitting with humility and contempt of the world ; a notable example of this kind I found in a Gentlemans hall, which was King Salomon sitting in his throne with a deepe lac’d Gentlewomans Ruffe, and a Rebatoe about his necke, upon his head a blacke Velvet cap with a white feather ; the Queene of Sheba kneeling before him in a loose bodied gowne, and a Frenchhood. […].

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

I am of opinion that Francis Mazzalinus would have proved the only rare Man of the World, if he had never Painted any other kind of Pictures (as rude, gross, and melancholly) then these slender ones which he representeth with an admirable dexterity as being naturally inclined thereunto ; so that if he had only represented Apollo, Bacchus, the Nimphes, &c. he had sufficiently warranted this his most acceptable proportion, which was ever slender, and oftentimes to sleight, but when he took upon him to express the Prophets, our Lady and the like in the same ; as appeareth by his Moses at Parma, our Lady at Ancona, and certain Angells not farr from thence, and divers other things quite contrary to the Symetry they ought to have, he gave a president to all other Painters to shunne the like error : which himself might also have easily avoided, being reputed little inferiour to Raphael Urbine, whom he might have proposed to himself as a patterne ; for Raphael ever suited his personages answerable to the variety of the Natures, and Dispositions of the Parties he imitated : so that his Old Folks seem stiff and crooked, his Young Men agile and slender and so forth in the rest, which example admonisheth us, that a Painter ought not to tye himself to any one kind of proportion, in all his Figures ; for besides that he shall lose the true Decorum of the History : He shall commit a great absurdity in the Art by making all his Pictures like Twinns : […]. And for our better understanding of this kind of proportion […] Raph: Urbine hath very well expressed it in St. George fighting with the Dragon, now to be seen in the Churches of St. Victore de Fratri in Milane ; in St. Michaell at Fontainblew in France, and in that George, which he made for the Duke of Urbine on a Peice richly guilt, according to which Observation of his, every Man may dispose of this proportion in the like young Bodies, […].

Browne cite ici une Madonne du Parmesan, semble-t-il conservée à Ancône, qui n'a pu être identifiée précisément.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → proportion

Quotation

[…] sleep causeth no motions of vigor or force to be represented, but as if the body were without life ; Wherefore we must take heed, we doe not (as some use) give unto those which sleep such kinds of actions in their lying, as in probability will not suffer them to sleep, as we see oftentimes in Men lying athwart stones, benches, &c. being represented with their limns supported by their own force, wherein it is evident, that such Painters know not how to observe a Decorum.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

Traveller.
           
After the Death of Raphael and his Schollars (for, as for Michael Angelo he made no School) Painting seemed to be Decaying ; and for some Years, there was hardly a Master of any Repute all over Italy. The two best at Rome were Joseph Arpino and Michael Angelo da Caravaggio, but both guilty of great Mistakes in their Art : the first followed purely his Fancy, or rather Humour, which was neither founded upon Nature nor Art, but had for Ground a certain Practical, Fantastical Idea which he had framed to himself. The other was a pure Naturalist, Copying Nature without distinction or discretion ; he understood little of Composition or Decorum, but was an admirable Colourer.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

Traveller.
            Invention
is the Manner of Expressing that Fable and Story which the Painter has chosen for the Subject of his Piece ; and may principally be divided into Order and Decorum. [...] The second part of Invention is Decorum ; that is, that there be nothing Absurd nor Discordant in the Piece : and in this part, the Lombard Painters are very faulty ; taking Liberties that move one almost to Laughter ; Witness Titian himself, who Drew Saint Margaret a Stride upon the Dragon : and most of the Lombard Painters are subject to a certain Absurdity of Anachronisaie’s Drawing. For Example, our Saviour upon the Cross, and Saint Francis and Saint Benedict looking on, though they did not live till eight hundred Years after our Saviour’s Passion. All Indecencies are likewise to be avoided : and Michael Angelo doth justly deserve to be Censured, in his great Picture of the Day of Judgment, for having exposed to view in the Church it self, the secret parts of Men and Women, and made Figures among the Blessed that kiss one another most tenderly. Raphael on the contrary, was so great an Observer of Decorum, that though his Subject led him to any Liberties of that kind, he would find a way to keep to the Rules of Modesty ; and indeed, he seems to have been Inspired for the Heads of his Madonna’s and Saints, it being impossible to imagine more Noble Physionomies than he gives them ; and withal, an Air of Pudour and Sanctity that strikes the Spectator with Respect.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

Polydore, in a Drawing I have seen of him, has made an Ill Choice with respect to Decorum ; he has shewn Cato with his Bowels gushing out, which is not only Offensive in itself, but ‘tis a Situation in which Cato should not be seen, ‘tis Indecent ; such things should be left to Imagination, and not display’d on the Stage. But Michelangelo in his last Judgment has sinn’d against this Rule most egregiously.

term translated by BIENSÉANCE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 51.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance