HISTORY

HISTORY (n.)

COPIOSE HISTORIE (nld.) · GESCHICHTE (deu.) · GESCHIEDENIS (nld.) · HISTOIRE (fra.) · HISTORIA (ita.) · HISTORIE (deu.) · HISTORIE (nld.) · ISTORIA (ita.) · VERVOLG (nld.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
HISTOIRE (fra.) · HISTORIE (nld.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
/ · HISTOIRE (fra.)
BLANC, Jan, « HISTOIRE », dans HECK, Michèle-Caroline (éd.), LexArt. Les mots de la peinture (France, Allemagne, Angleterre, Pays-Bas, 1600-1750) [édition anglaise, 2018], Montpellier, Presses Universitaires de la Méditerranée, 2018, p. 263-270.
COOKE, Peter et LÜBBREN, Nina (éd.), Painting and narrative in France, from Poussin to Gauguin, New York, Routledge, 2016.
GAEHTGENS, Thomas W. (éd.), Historienmalerei, Darmstadt, Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 2003.
HENRY, Christophe, « La peinture en question : genèse conflictuelle d’une fonction sociale de la peinture d’histoire en France au milieu du XVIIIe siècle », dans GAEHTGENS, Thomas W., RABREAU, Daniel, MICHEL, Christian et SCHIEDER, Martin (éd.), L’Art et les normes sociales au XVIIIe siècle, Actes du colloque de Paris, Paris, Éd. de la Maison des sciences de l’homme, 2001, p. 459-476.
JOLLET, Étienne, « Towards a Study of Narrative in Painting: the Early Modern Period », dans COOKE, Peter et LÜBBREN, Nina (éd.), Painting and narrative in France, from Poussin to Gauguin, London, Taylor & Francis Ltd, 2016, p. 211-224.
KIRCHNER, Thomas, Le héros épique. Peinture d’histoire et politique artistique dans la France du XVIIe siècle, Paris, Éd. de la Maison des sciences de l’homme, 2008.
WRIGLEY, Richard, « But is it serious », The Oxford Art Journal, XXXVIII/1, 2015, p. 143-148.

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CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

5 sources
8 quotations

Quotation

The Third Division of History.
{History of rare pieces by
Salmiato.} You shall rarely see History in Limning to be done in any largeness. […].
{The difference in Painting History and Picture.} The difference in Painting of
Pictures and History are infinite, though the Colours be the same ; and to particularise but in part, what may be said of this subject would be endlesse.
{Variety of Colours in the Life.} The most remarkable difference certainely is in the variety of
Colours which according to their several Complexions, Sex, and Ages may be represented, and many times according to the humour, judgment and affection of the Workman ; And we see ordinarily, the practice of the best and most famous Painters, (those that follow the Life,) doe tye themselves straightly and precisely, to what they see in their patternes (the designes and drawings of Bloomart and Spranger.) Yet in the Invention they assume unto themselves liberty or rather licence in their racking and strained proportions so others in their Colouring, as that many times extravagancies, and impossibilites, (if not ridiculous), do appear.

Conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire

Quotation

Of the passions of the Mind, their original and difference.


The
passions of the mind, are nothing else but certain motions, proceeding from the apprehension of some thing, now this apprehension is Threefold, sensitive, rational, and intellectual, […] there are Eleven passions or affections in the mind, which are these, love, hatred, desire, fear, joy, sorrow, hope, dispair, audacity, timerousness and anger, from which there do consequently arise so many sorts of actions in the art, as there may be affections expressed in Mens Bodies, wherefore we ought carefully to observe the motions which are outwardly expressed, in such sort, as they do manifestly point to the roots, whence they spring, and discover the causes from which they proceed, distributing them and disposing them accordingly in the Bodies, or Physiognomies which whosoever shall fail in, shall (questionless) wholly pervert the Order of things, confounding the Beauty of Histories, whether they be Fables, or other Inventions, which are to be painted.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix

Quotation

History.
History-Painting is an Assembling of many Figures in one Piece, to Represent any Action of Life, whether True or Fabulous, accompanied with all its Ornaments of Landskip and Perspective.

Conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire

Quotation

Traveller.
           
I must then repeat to you what I told you at our first Meeting [ndr : Dialogue I, « Explaining the Art of Painting »] ; which is, That the Art of Painting has three Parts ; which are, Design, Colouring, and Invention ; and under this third, is that which we call Disposition ; which is properly the Order in which all the Parts of the Story are disposed, so as to produce one effect according to the Design of the Painter ; and that is the first Effect which a good Piece of History is to produce in the Spectator ; that is, if it be a Picture of a joyful Event, that all that is in it be Gay and Smiling, to the very Landskips, Houses, Heavens, Cloaths, &c. And that all the Aptitudes tend to Mirth. The same, if the Story be Sad, or Solemn ; and so for the rest. And a Piece that does not do this at first sight, is most certainly faulty though it never so well Designed, or never so well Coloured ; nay, though there be Learning and Invention in it ; for as a Play that is designed to make me Laugh, is most certainly an ill one if it makes me Cry. So an Historical Piece that doth not produce the Effect it is designed for, cannot pretend to an Excellency, though it be never so finely Painted.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance
GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire

Quotation

I confine the Sublime to History, and Portrait-Painting ; And These must excell in Grace, and Greatness, Invention, or Expression ; and that for Reasons which will be seen anon. Michael Angelo’s Great Style intitles Him to the Sublime, not his Drawing ; ‘tis that Greatness, and a competent degree of Grace, and not his Colouring that makes Titian capable of it : As Correggio’s Grace, with a sufficient mixture of Greatness gives this Noble Quality to His Works. Van Dyck’s Colouring, nor Pencil tho’ perfectly fine would never introduce him to the Sublime ; ‘tis his Expression, and that Grace, and Greatness he possess’d, (the Utmost that Portrait-Painting is Justly capable of) that sets some of his Works in that Exalted Class ; in which on That account he may perhaps take place of Rafaelle himself in That Kind of Painting, if that Great Man’s Fine, and Noble Idea’s carried him asmuch above Nature Then, as they did in History, where the utmost that can be done is commendable ; a due Subordination of Characters being preserved ; And thus (by the way) V. Dyck’s Colouring, and Pencil may be judg’d Equal to that of Corregio, or any other Master.

term translated by / in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 17.

Conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → merveilleux et sublime

Quotation

When therefore we are to make a Judgment in what Degree of Goodness a Picture or Drawing is we should consider its Kind first, and then its several Parts. A History is preferrable to a Landscape, Sea-Piece, Animals, Fruit, Flowers, or any other Still-Life, pieces of Drollery, &c ; the reason is, the latter Kinds may Please, and in proportion as they do so they are Estimable, and that is according to every one’s Taste, but they cannot Improve the Mind, they excite no Noble Sentiments ; at least not as the other naturally does : These not only give us Pleasure, as being Beautiful Objects, and Furnishing us with Ideas as the Other do, but the Pleasure we receive from Hence is Greater (I speak in General, and what the nature of the thing is capable of) ‘tis of a Nobler Kind than the Other ; and Then moreover the Mind may be Inrich’d, and made Better.

term translated by HISTOIRE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 21-22.

Conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Quotation

He that Paints a History well, must be able to Write it ; he must be throughly inform’d of all things relating to it, and conceive it clearly, and nobly in his Mind, or he can never express it upon the Canvas : He must have a solid Judgment, with a lively Imagination, and know what Figures, and what Incidents ought to be brought in, and what every one should Say, and Think.

term translated by HISTOIRE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 14.

Conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → peinture d’histoire

Quotation

But these Liberties [ndr : prises envers la vérité historique et naturelle] must be taken with great Caution and Judgment ; for in the main, Historical, and Natural Truth must be observed, the Story may be embellish’d, or something of it par’d away, but still So as it may be immediately known ; nor must any thing be contrary to Nature but upon great Necessity, and apparent Reason. History must not be corrupted, and turn’d into Fable or Romance : Every Person, and Thing must be made to sustain its proper Character ; and not only the Story, but the Circumstances must be observ’d, the Scene of Action, the Countrey, or Place, the Habits, Arms, Manners, Proportions, and the like, must correspond. This is call’d the observing the Costûme.

story

term translated by HISTOIRE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 40.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai