HARMONY (n.)

ARMONIA (ita.) · HARMONIE (fra.) · HARMONIE (nld.) · HARMONIE (deu.) · HOUDING (nld.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
ACCORD (fra.) · CONVENANCE (fra.) · EURYTHMIE (fra.) · HARMONIE (fra.) · HARMONIE (nld.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
HARMONIE (fra.)
BIALOSTOCKI, Jan, « Das Modus Problem in den bildenden Künsten. Zur Vorgeschichte und zum Nachleben des "Modusbriefes" von Nicolas Poussin », Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte, 24/2, 1966, p. 128-141 [En ligne : http://www.jstor.org/stable/1481515 consulté le 30/03/2018].
BORNSCHEUER, Marion, Von der Bildbetrachtung zur Theorie der Malerei : die Kunsttheorie des Sébastien Bourdon (1616-1671), Hildesheim, Olms, 2005.
CZECH, Hans-Jörg, Im Geleit der Musen. Studien zu Samuel van Hoogstratens Malereitraktat Inleyding tot de Hooge Schoole der Schilderkonst: Anders de Zichtbaere Werelt, Münster, Waxmann, 2002.
DETHLEFS, Hans Joachim, « HARMONIE DES COULEURS », dans HECK, Michèle-Caroline (éd.), LexArt. Les mots de la peinture (France, Allemagne, Angleterre, Pays-Bas, 1600-1750) [édition anglaise, 2018], Montpellier, Presses Universitaires de la Méditerranée, 2018, p. 259-263.
DETHLEFS, Hans Joachim, « HARMONIE », dans HECK, Michèle-Caroline (éd.), LexArt. Les mots de la peinture (France, Allemagne, Angleterre, Pays-Bas, 1600-1750) [édition anglaise, 2018], Montpellier, Presses Universitaires de la Méditerranée, 2018, p. 253-259.
GAGE, John, Color and Meaning. Art, Science, and Symbolism, London, Thames & Hudson, 2003.
KÖRNER, Hans, Auf der Suche nach der wahren Einheit. Ganzheits Vorstellungen in der französischen Malerei und Kunstliteratur, München, W. Fink, 1988.
MARIN, Louis, « La lecture du tableau d'après Poussin », Cahiers de l'Association internationale des études francaises, 24, 1972, p. 251-266 [En ligne : www.persee.fr/doc/caief_0571-5865_1972_num_24_1_1013 consulté le 24/10/2016].
MESSERER, Wilhelm, « Die Modi im Werk von Poussin », dans SCHMOLL gen. EISENWERTH, J.A. (éd.), Festschrift Luitpold Dussler, München - Berlin, Deutscher Kunstverlag, 1972, p. 335-356.
MICHEL, Christian et LICHTENSTEIN, Jacqueline (éd.), Conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. Les conférences au temps de Guillet de Saint-Georges, 1682-1699, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 2008, 6 tomes, tome II, 2 vol.
MICHEL, Christian, LICHTENSTEIN, Jacqueline et CASTEX, Jean-Gérald (éd.), Conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. Les conférences, 1712-1746, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 2010, 6 tomes, tome IV, 2 vol.
MICHEL, Christian, LICHTENSTEIN, Jacqueline, CASTEX, Jean-Gérald, CASTOR, Markus A. et GADY, Bénédicte (éd.), Conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. Les conférences au temps de Jules Hardouin-Mansart, 1699-1711, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 2009, 6 tomes, tome III.
MICHEL, Christian, LICHTENSTEIN, Jacqueline, CASTOR, Markus A., MARTIN, Marie-Pauline, PERRIN KHELISSA, Anne et LAZ, Laurens (éd.), Conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. Les conférences, 1752-1792, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 2015, 6 tomes, tome VI, 3 vol.
MICHEL, Christian, LICHTENSTEIN, Jacqueline, COUSSEAU, Henry-Claude et GAEHTGENS, Thomas W. (éd.), Conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. Les conférences au temps d’Henry Testelin, 1648-1681, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 2006, 6 tomes, tome I, 2 vol.
MICHEL, Christian, LICHTENSTEIN, Jacqueline, HAOUADEG, Karim, MARTIN, Marie-Pauline et PERRIN KHELISSA, Anne (éd.), Conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. Les conférences au temps de Charles-Antoine Coypel, 1747-1752, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 2012, 6 tomes, tome V, 2 vol.
MONTAGU, Jennifer, « The theory of the musical modes in the Académie royale de Peinture et de Sculpture », Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, vol. 55, 1992, p. 233-248 [En ligne : http://www.jstor.org/stable/751426 consulté le 09/02/2018].
MÉROT, Alain, « Les modes, ou le paradoxe du peintre », dans ROSENBERG, Pierre et MÉROT, Alain (éd.), Nicolas Poussin, Actes du colloque du Louvre, Paris, La Documentation française, 1996, p. 80-88.
REYES, Hector, « The Rhetorical Frame of Poussin's Theory of the Modes », Intellectual History Review, 19/3, 2009, p. 287-302 [En ligne : https://doi.org/10.1080/17496970903266202 consulté le 13/04/2018].
WELLMANN, Marc, Die Entdeckung der Unschärfe in Optik und Malerei. Zum Verhältnis von Kunst und Wissenschaft zwischen dem 15. und dem 19. Jahrhundert, Frankfurt am Main, Lang, 2005.
ZEITLER, Rudolf, « II problema dei modi e la consapevolezza di Poussin », Critica d'arte, XII/19, 1965, p. 26-35.

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

6 sources
15 quotations

Quotation

{2. Proportion.} Of Proportion.
It’s called
Symmetry, Analogie, Harmony.
Proportion is of any part ; a Hand fitted to the bigness of a body.
Symmetry is the proportion of each finger to that bigness ; Analogie or Harmonie. All together in one ; a Concinnity of Harmony ; A congruence, or equality of parts and members ; or due connexion, in reference of all parts, one to the other, and all to the whole, which produceth a perfect Nature, or beauty.
{Of true beauty.} Whatsoever is made, after a conceived or Intelligible thing is Fair.
Whatsoever is made, after a thing generated, is not faire.
Beauty, may be perfectly conceived.
{Naturall and conceived.} True
beauty in any Creature, is not to be found ; being full of deformed disproportions, far remote from truth ; for sinne is the cause of deformity.
Beauty in truth, is, where Joynts and severally every part with the whole, hath its due proportion and measure ; and therefore hard to describe.
Beauty should consist but of One at the most ; and deformity contrariwise, measured by many : for the eeven Lineaments and due proportion of fair and goodly Persons, seem to be created and framed, by the judgement and sight of one form alone, which cannot be in deformed persons ; as with blub cheeks, bigg eyes, little nose, flat mouth, out chin, and brown skin, as it were moulded from many ill faces ; and yet some one part considered about, to be handsome, but altogether become ugly ; not for any other cause, but that they may be Lineaments of many fair women, and not of One. The Painter, did well, to procure all the fair maides naked, to judge of each severall and single perfection ; and so from the Idea of fancie, to shape a Venus. {By the Idea.}
{His brave and unpattern’d and unparallel’d Piece of
Artimesia.} And thus, by often exercise from severall beauties, you shall fixe a conceived Idea is your mind of accomplished Pulchritude grace or comlinesse, according to the true rule of Symmetry. […].
A
Beauty may be expressed by a comely body, though not of delicate features ; rather dignity of presence, than beauty of aspect. It is seen at the first sight. Favour more than Colour ; and yet that of decent and gratious motion, more than that of favour.
There is no excellent
beauty without some strangeness in the proportion, and both Apelles and Albert Durer, doe but trifles out the time and trouble us ; The One to compose a Personage by Geometricall proportion ; and Apelles by collecting the best parts from severall faces, to make one excellent. Indeed a Painter may make a better personage than ever was seen since the first Creation ; which he does by a kind of felicity, not by Rule, as a Musician doth his French Aires, not by true Method of setting.
[…].

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

Friend,
            Wherein particularly lies the Art of
Colouring ?
            Traveller.
Beside the Mixture of Colours, such as may answer the Painter’s Aim, it lies in a certain Contention, as I may call it, between the Light and the Shades, which by the means of Colours, are brought to Unite with each other ; and so to give that Roundness to the Figures, which the Italians call Relievo, and for which we have no other Name : In this, if the Shadows are too strong, the Piece is harsh and hard, if too weak, and there be too much Light, ’tis flat. I, for my part, should like a Colouring rather something Brown, but clear, than a bright gay one : But particularly, I think, that those fine Coral Lips, and Cherry Cheeks, are to be Banished, as being far from Flesh and Blood. ’Tis true, the Skins, or Complexions must vary, according to the Age and Sex of the Person ; An Old Woman requiring another Colouring than a fresh Young one. But the Painters must particularly take Care, that there be nothing harsh to offend the Eye, as that neither the Contours, or Out-Lines, be too strongly Terminated, nor the Shadows too hard, nor such Colours placed by one another as do not agree. 
           
Friend,
Is there any Rule for that ?
           
Traveller,
Some Observations there are, as those Figures which are placed on the foremost Ground, or next the Eye, ought to have the greatest Strength, both in their Lights and Shadows, and Cloathed with a lively Drapery ; Observing, that as they lessen by distance, and are behind, to give both the Flesh and the Drapery more faint and obscure Colouring. And this is called an Union in Painting, which makes up an Harmony to the Eye, and causes the Whole to appear one, and not two or three Pictures
.

union

Conceptual field(s)

Quotation

Friend.
 
            What is properly the Colouring of a Piece of Painting ?
 
                        Traveller.
 
           
It is the Art of employing the Colours proper to the Subject, with a regard to the Lights and Shadows that are incident to the Story, either according to the Truth of it, or to the Painter’s Invention : and out of the Management of these comes all the Strength, Relievo, and Roundness that the Figures have : ’tis hard to give Positive Rules here, it depending much on Practice ; but the most General is, so to manage your Colours, Lights, and Shadows, that the Bodies enlightned may appear by the Opposition of your Shadows ; which by that means may make the Eye rest with Pleasure upon them ; and also, that there be an imperceptible passage from your Shadows to your Lights.
            ’Tis generally observed likewise to make the greatest Light fall upon the middle of the Piece, where the principal Figures ought to be, and to lessen it by degrees towards the sides till it loose it self.
In gentle Shadows, avoid strong Shadowings upon the Naked Members, least the black that is in them seems to be part of the Flesh. But above all, there is a thing called by the Italians, Il degra damento de Colori ; which in English may be termed, The diminishing of Colours : And it consists in making an Union and Concord between the Colours in the formost part of your Piece, and those that are behind, so that they be all of one tenour, and not broke ; and by this means every part corresponds with another in your Picture, and makes up one Harmony to the Eye.

concord · union

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

Quotation

In Carnations, we must avoid the Affectation of too many Clear Red Colours, which more resemble the Skin when Flead of, then the true Natural Skin.
            Nor must we affect the diversity of
Sparkling and Glowing Colours, as the Bright of Diaphanous Bodys, which represent reflections of the variety of Neighbouring Colours ; always remembring, that mans Skin how Beautiful soever, dwells in a delicate down-Colour.
            We must observe in the
Contrast, or the Opposition which Intervenes in the Union of Colours ; that by a sweet Interruption it may rayse up its Briskness, without it a fading Disagreeableness ensues.
           
In Landskip we must observe, that the Air being universally overspread, carrys something of Light with it, and admits nothing Darke in places at distance and approaching the Horizon.
            That which way soever we carry the
Wind, the Clouds, Trees and all Things Subject to its Motion, tend the same way.
            That in Clouds for
Storms, &c. they be Painted in manner of a Group, and not to much Scattering by Breakes, which will disturb the Harmony of the Picture.
[...].

Conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → paysage

Quotation

And lastly you must take care in the Colouring of the Harmony which makes the variety of Colours agree, supplying the Weakness of some by the Strength of others, to sustain them, as by a Consonance well manag’d, where they must neglect on purpose certain places, to serve for the Basis and Repose of the Sight ; and to raise up those which by their Briskness keep upmost.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

I will give a Specimen of what I have been proposing [ndr : dans sa manière de juger une peinture], and the Subject shall be a Portrait of V. Dyck which I have, ‘tis a Half-length of a Countess Dowager of Exeter, as I learn from the Print made of it by Faithorn, and that is almost all one can learn from That concerning the Picture besides the General Attitude, and Disposition of it. [...] But so far as the Head, and almost to the Wast, with the Curtain behind, there is an Admirable Harmony, the Chair also makes a Medium between the Figure, and the Ground. The Eye is deliver’d down into that Dead Black Spot the Drapery with great Ease, the Neck is cover’d with Linnen, and at the Breast the top of the Stomacher makes a streight line. This would have been very harsh, and disagreeable but that ‘tis very Artfully broken by the Bowes of a Knot of narrow Ribbon which rise above that Line in fine, well-contrasted Shapes. This Knot fastens a Jewel on the Breast, which also helps to produce the Harmony of this part of the Picture, and the white Gloves which the Lady holds in her Left Hand, helps the Composition something as they vary That Light Spot from That which the Other Hand, and Linnen makes.

term translated by HARMONIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 30-32.

Conceptual field(s)

Quotation

The Beauty, and Harmony of the Colouring gives Me a great Degree of Pleasure [ndr : dans le portrait de la comtesse Dowager d’Exeter par Van Dyck] ; for tho’ This is Grave and Solid, it has a Beauty not less than what is Bright, and Gay. So much of the Composition as is Good does also much Delight the Eye ; And tho’ the Lady is not Young, nor remarkably Handsome, the Grace, and Greatness that is here represented pleases exceedingly. In a Word, as throughout this whole Picture one sees Instances of an Accurate Hand, and Fine Thought, These must give proportionable Pleasure to so hearty a Lover as I am.

term translated by HARMONIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 37.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

The Composition is unexceptionable [ndr : dans Poussin, Tancrède et Herminie] : There are innumerable Instances of Beautiful Contrasts ; Of this kind are the several Characters of the Persons, (all which are Excellent in their several kinds) and the several Habits : Tancred is half Naked : Erminia’s Sex distinguishes Her from all the rest ; as Vafrino’s Armour, and Helmet shews Him to be Inferiour to Tancred, (His lying by him) and Argante’s Armour differs from both of them. The various positions of the Limbs in all the Figures are also finely Contrasted, and altogether have a lovely effect ; Nor did I ever see a greater Harmony, nor more Art to produce it in any Picture of what Master soever, whether as to the Easy Gradation from the Principal, to the Subordinate Parts, the Connection of one with another, by the degrees of the Lights, and Shadows, and the Tincts of the Colours.

term translated by HARMONIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 51-52.

Conceptual field(s)

Quotation

PAINTING is indeed a Difficult Art, productive of Curious pieces of Workmanship, and greatly Ornamental ; and its Business is to represent Nature. Thus far the Common Idea is just ; Only that ‘tis More Difficult, More Curious, and More Beautifull than is Commonly Imagin’d.
‘Tis an entertaining thing to the Mind of Man to see a fine piece of Art in Any kind ; and every one is apt to take a sort of Pride in it as being done by one of his Own Species, to whom with respect to the Universe he stands related as to one of the Same Countrey, or the Same Family. Painting affords us a great Variety of This kind of Pleasure in the Delicate, or Bold management of the Pencil ; in the mixture of its Colours, in the Skilful Contrivance of the several parts of the Picture, and infinite Variety of the Tincts, so as to produce Beauty, and Harmony. This alone gives great Pleasure to those who have learn’d to see these things.

term translated by HARMONIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 119

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

I have many times observ’d with a great deal of Pleasure the admirable Composition (besides other Excellencies) of a Fruit-piece of Michelangelo Compadoglio, which I have had many Years. The principal Light is near the Centre (not Exactly there, for those Regularities have an ill effect ;) and the Transition from thence, and from one thing to another, to the Extremities of the Picture all round is very Easy, and Delightful ; in which he has employ’d fine Artifices by Leaves, Twigs, little Touches of Lights striking advantageously, and the like. So that there is not a Stroke in the Picture without its Meaning ; and the whole, tho’ very Bright, and consisting of a great many Parts, has a wonderful Harmony, and Repose.

term translated by HARMONIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 96-97.

Conceptual field(s)

Quotation

In a Figure, and every part of a Figure, and indeed in every thing else there is One part which must have a peculiar Force, and be manifestly distinguish’d from the rest, all the Other parts of Which must also have a due Subordination to It, and to One Another. The same must be observ’d in the Composition of an entire Picture ; And this Principal, Distinguis’d part ought (Generally speaking) to be the Place of the Principal Figure, and Action : And Here every thing must be higher Finish’d, the Other parts must be Less so Gradually.
Pictures should be like Bunches of Grapes, but they must not resemble a great many single Grapes scatter’d on a Table ; there must not be many little Parts of an Equal Strength, and detach’d from one another, which is as odious to the Eye as ‘tis to the Ear to hear many People talking to you at once. Nothing must Start, or be too strong for the Place where it is as in a Confort of Musick when a Note is too high, or an Instrument out of Tune ; but a sweet Harmony and Repose must result from all the Parts judiciously put together, and united with each other.

term translated by HARMONIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 101-102.

Conceptual field(s)

Quotation

In a Composition, as well as in every Single Figure, or other part of which the Picture consists, one thing must Contrast, or be varied from another. Thus in a Figure, the Arms and Legs must not be placed to answer one another in Parallel Lines. In like manner if one Figure in a Composition Stands, another must Bend, or Lye on the Ground ; and of those that Stand, or are in any other Position, if there be several of them, they must be varied by Turns of the Head, or some other Artful Disposition of their Parts ; as may be seen (for instance) in the Carton of giving the Keys. The Masses must also have the like Contrast, two must not be alike in Form, or Size, nor the whole Mass compos’d of those lesser ones of too Regular a Shape. The Colours must be also Contrasted, and Oppos’d, so as to be grateful to the Eye : There must not (for example) be two Draperies in one Picture of the same Colour, and Strength, unless they are contiguous, and then they are but as one. If there be two Reds, Blews, or whatever other Colour, One must be of a Darker, or Paler Tinct, or be some way Varied by Lights, Shadows, of Reflections. Rafaëlle, and others have made great Advantage of Changeable Silks to unite the Contrasting Colours, as well as to make a part of the Contrast themselves. As in the Carton of Giving the Keys, the Apostle that stands in Profile, and immediately behind S. John, has a Yellow Garment with Red Sleeves, which connects that Figure with S. Peter, and S. John, whose Draperies are of the same Species of Colours. Then the same Anonymous Apostle has a loose changeable Drapery, the Lights of which are a Mixture of Red, and Yellow, the other Parts are Bluish. This Unites it self with the Other Colours already mentioned, and with the Blew Drapery of another Apostle which follows afterwards ; between which, and the changeable Silk is a Yellow Drapery something different from the other Yellows, but with Shadows bearing upon the Purple, as those of the Yellow Drapery of S. Peter incline to the Red : All which, together with several other Particulars, produce a wonderful Harmony.

term translated by HARMONIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 106-108.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

Any of the several Species of Colours may be as Beautiful in their Kinds as the others, but one Kind is more so than another, as having more Variety, and consisting of Colours more pleasing in their own Nature ; in which, and the Harmony, and Agreement of one Tinct with another, the Goodness of Colouring consists.
To shew the Beauty of Variety I will instance in a
Geldër Rose, which is White ; but having many Leaves one under another, and lying hollow so as to be seen through in some places, which occasions several Tincts of Light, and Shadow ; and together with these some of the Leaves having a Greenish Tinct, all together produces that Variety which gives a Beauty not to be found in this Paper, tho’ ‘tis White, nor in the inside of an Egg-shell tho’ whiter, nor in any other White Object that has not that Variety.

term translated by HARMONIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 125-126.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

But ‘tis not enough that the Colours in themselves are Beautiful singly, and that there be Variety, They must be set by one another so as to be mutually assistant to each other ; and this not only in the Object painted, but in the Ground, and whatsoever comes into the Composition ; so as that every Part, and the Whole together may have a pleasing effect to the Eye ; such a Harmony to It as a good piece of Musick has to the Ear ; But for which no certain Rules can be given no more than for that : Except in some few General Cases which are very Obvious, and need not therefore be mention’d here.

term translated by HARMONIE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 128.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

Apelles himself was so ingenuous to own so great a Proficiency therein, as might seem to add Confirmation, while in the Disposition, or Ordinance, he modestly yielded to Amphion ; in the Measures, or Proportions, he subscribed to Aschepiodorus ; and of Protogenes was wont to say, in all Points he was equal to him, if not above him ; but after all, there was yet one Thing wanting in them all, which was instar omnium, or, however, the Beauty and Life of all, which he only ascribed, and was proud in being the sole Master of himself, viz. his Venus by the Greeks, named ΧΑΡΙΣ a certain peculiar Grace, sometimes called the Air of the Picture, resulting from a due Observation and Concurrence of all the essential Points and Rules requisite in a compleat Picture, accompany’d with an unconstrained and unaffected Facility and Freedom of the Pencil, which together produced such a ravishing Harmony, that made their Works seem to be performed by some divine and unspeakable Way of ART ; and which (as Fr. Junius expresseth it) is not a Perfection of ART, proceeding meerly from ART, but rather a Perfection proceeding from a consummate ART.
HENCE it was that
Apelles admiring the wonderful Pains and Curiosity in each Point in a Picture of Protogenes’s Painting, yet took Occasion from thence to reprehend him for it as a Fault quod nescivit manum tollere de tabula, implying, that a heavy and painful Diligence and Affectation, are destructive of that Comeliness, Beauty and admired Grace, which only a prompt and prosperous Facility proceeding from a found Judgment of ART, can offord unto us.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection