ASCLEPIODOROS


Aucune information sur cet artiste de l'Antiquité

Quotation

Apelles himself was so ingenuous to own so great a Proficiency therein, as might seem to add Confirmation, while in the Disposition, or Ordinance, he modestly yielded to Amphion ; in the Measures, or Proportions, he subscribed to Aschepiodorus ; and of Protogenes was wont to say, in all Points he was equal to him, if not above him ; but after all, there was yet one Thing wanting in them all, which was instar omnium, or, however, the Beauty and Life of all, which he only ascribed, and was proud in being the sole Master of himself, viz. his Venus by the Greeks, named ΧΑΡΙΣ a certain peculiar Grace, sometimes called the Air of the Picture, resulting from a due Observation and Concurrence of all the essential Points and Rules requisite in a compleat Picture, accompany’d with an unconstrained and unaffected Facility and Freedom of the Pencil, which together produced such a ravishing Harmony, that made their Works seem to be performed by some divine and unspeakable Way of ART ; and which (as Fr. Junius expresseth it) is not a Perfection of ART, proceeding meerly from ART, but rather a Perfection proceeding from a consummate ART.
HENCE it was that
Apelles admiring the wonderful Pains and Curiosity in each Point in a Picture of Protogenes’s Painting, yet took Occasion from thence to reprehend him for it as a Fault quod nescivit manum tollere de tabula, implying, that a heavy and painful Diligence and Affectation, are destructive of that Comeliness, Beauty and admired Grace, which only a prompt and prosperous Facility proceeding from a found Judgment of ART, can offord unto us.

Quotation

Apelles himself was so ingenuous to own so great a Proficiency therein, as might seem to add Confirmation, while in the Disposition, or Ordinance, he modestly yielded to Amphion ; in the Measures, or Proportions, he subscribed to Aschepiodorus ; and of Protogenes was wont to say, in all Points he was equal to him, if not above him ; but after all, there was yet one Thing wanting in them all, which was instar omnium, or, however, the Beauty and Life of all, which he only ascribed, and was proud in being the sole Master of himself, viz. his Venus by the Greeks, named ΧΑΡΙΣ a certain peculiar Grace, sometimes called the Air of the Picture, resulting from a due Observation and Concurrence of all the essential Points and Rules requisite in a compleat Picture, accompany’d with an unconstrained and unaffected Facility and Freedom of the Pencil, which together produced such a ravishing Harmony, that made their Works seem to be performed by some divine and unspeakable Way of ART ; and which (as Fr. Junius expresseth it) is not a Perfection of ART, proceeding meerly from ART, but rather a Perfection proceeding from a consummate ART.
HENCE it was that
Apelles admiring the wonderful Pains and Curiosity in each Point in a Picture of Protogenes’s Painting, yet took Occasion from thence to reprehend him for it as a Fault quod nescivit manum tollere de tabula, implying, that a heavy and painful Diligence and Affectation, are destructive of that Comeliness, Beauty and admired Grace, which only a prompt and prosperous Facility proceeding from a found Judgment of ART, can offord unto us.

Quotation

Tot noch toe hebben wy d’Ordinantie, die uyt d’Inventie oorspronckelick voordspruyt, aenghemerckt; volght dat wy nu een weynigh handelen van de Dispositie, die ’t werck is van een nauwluysterende Proportie. Daer om schijnt oock dese Dispositie, om de waerheyd te segghen, seer weynigh van de Proportie te verschillen: Want ghelijckse nerghens anders op uyt gaet, dan datse ’t rechte tusschenscheyd der figuren behoorlicker wijse waerneme ende onderhoudt; soo wordtse ten aensien vande groote ghemeynschap diese met de Proportie selver heeft, een Symmetrie in Plinius ghenaemt: Apelles, seght hy {Lib. xxxv. Cap. 10.}, plaght de Symmetrie van Asclepiodorus met groote verwondering t’aenschouwen; Want dit segghende, soo heeft hy daer mede anders niet te verstaen ghegeven, dan dat sich Apelles met den voornoemden Asclepiodorus niet en heeft dorven verghelijcken, Inde maeten, dat is, in ’t waernemen van de tusschen-wijdde diemen in verscheyden figuren behoort t’onderhouden, ghelijck den selvighen autheur in ’t selvighe Capittel is sprekende. Wat dese Dispositie belanght, men kanse aen gheen sekere ghesette regulen verbinden; ons ooge heeft daer in ’t meeste bedrijf:

Quotation

Pour ce qui concerne la Proportion, c’est-à-dire la Symmetrie ou correspondance du Tout avec ses parties, c’est une chose facile, et à la portée de tous les esprits : ce qui fait que l’ignorance est sans excuse, parce qu’on peut l’acquerir presque sans peine, et mesmes par une estude entierement mechanique : mais le seul moyen de parvenir à sa perfection, et d’en avoir une connoissance bien esclairée, c’est d’aller par le chemin de la Geométrie, qui est la source de tous les Arts. […]

Quotation

Apelles himself was so ingenuous to own so great a Proficiency therein, as might seem to add Confirmation, while in the Disposition, or Ordinance, he modestly yielded to Amphion ; in the Measures, or Proportions, he subscribed to Aschepiodorus ; and of Protogenes was wont to say, in all Points he was equal to him, if not above him ; but after all, there was yet one Thing wanting in them all, which was instar omnium, or, however, the Beauty and Life of all, which he only ascribed, and was proud in being the sole Master of himself, viz. his Venus by the Greeks, named ΧΑΡΙΣ a certain peculiar Grace, sometimes called the Air of the Picture, resulting from a due Observation and Concurrence of all the essential Points and Rules requisite in a compleat Picture, accompany’d with an unconstrained and unaffected Facility and Freedom of the Pencil, which together produced such a ravishing Harmony, that made their Works seem to be performed by some divine and unspeakable Way of ART ; and which (as Fr. Junius expresseth it) is not a Perfection of ART, proceeding meerly from ART, but rather a Perfection proceeding from a consummate ART.
HENCE it was that
Apelles admiring the wonderful Pains and Curiosity in each Point in a Picture of Protogenes’s Painting, yet took Occasion from thence to reprehend him for it as a Fault quod nescivit manum tollere de tabula, implying, that a heavy and painful Diligence and Affectation, are destructive of that Comeliness, Beauty and admired Grace, which only a prompt and prosperous Facility proceeding from a found Judgment of ART, can offord unto us.

Quotation

Dewijl het dan vast gaet dat de waere schoonheyd der naturelicker lichaemen maer alleen in de ghevoeghlicheydt deser Harmonie te vinden is, soo volght het oock daer uyt onwedersprekelick, dat de rechte naeboetsinghe deser lichamen voornamelick in het waernemen deser Harmonie gheleghen is. Alle ghedeelten van een stock-beeld behooren schoon te sijn seght Socrates apud Stobaeum Serm. I. wy en staen in de Colossische wercken niet soo seer op de aerdighe netticheyt van elck bysonder ghedeelte, of wy plaghten vele meer op de schoonheyd van ’t gheheele maecksel te letten, seght Strabo Lib. I. Geogr. Die naeboetsinghen worden voor d’allerspottlickste ghehouden, seght Galenus {Lib. i. de Usu partium corporis humani}, de welcke de ghelijckenisse diese in vele ghedeelten waernemen, in de voornaemste versuymen. Parrhasius, Polycletus, en Asclepiodorus sijn d’eerste en voornaemste grondleggers ende onderhouders deser Symmetrie gheweest. Parrhasius was den eersten die de Schilder-konst haere behoorlicke Symmetrie ghegheven heeft. Plin. XXXV.10. Polycletus nam de Symmetrie op het aller naerstighste waer. Plin XXXIV. 8. Asclepiodorus gingh soo meesterlick met sijne stucken te werck, seght den selvighen Plinius {Lib. XXXV. Cap. 10.}, dat sich Apelles grootlicks plaght te verwonderen over de Symmetrie die hy daer in ghebruyckte.

Quotation

Apelles himself was so ingenuous to own so great a Proficiency therein, as might seem to add Confirmation, while in the Disposition, or Ordinance, he modestly yielded to Amphion ; in the Measures, or Proportions, he subscribed to Aschepiodorus ; and of Protogenes was wont to say, in all Points he was equal to him, if not above him ; but after all, there was yet one Thing wanting in them all, which was instar omnium, or, however, the Beauty and Life of all, which he only ascribed, and was proud in being the sole Master of himself, viz. his Venus by the Greeks, named ΧΑΡΙΣ a certain peculiar Grace, sometimes called the Air of the Picture, resulting from a due Observation and Concurrence of all the essential Points and Rules requisite in a compleat Picture, accompany’d with an unconstrained and unaffected Facility and Freedom of the Pencil, which together produced such a ravishing Harmony, that made their Works seem to be performed by some divine and unspeakable Way of ART ; and which (as Fr. Junius expresseth it) is not a Perfection of ART, proceeding meerly from ART, but rather a Perfection proceeding from a consummate ART.
HENCE it was that
Apelles admiring the wonderful Pains and Curiosity in each Point in a Picture of Protogenes’s Painting, yet took Occasion from thence to reprehend him for it as a Fault quod nescivit manum tollere de tabula, implying, that a heavy and painful Diligence and Affectation, are destructive of that Comeliness, Beauty and admired Grace, which only a prompt and prosperous Facility proceeding from a found Judgment of ART, can offord unto us.

Quotation

Apelles himself was so ingenuous to own so great a Proficiency therein, as might seem to add Confirmation, while in the Disposition, or Ordinance, he modestly yielded to Amphion ; in the Measures, or Proportions, he subscribed to Aschepiodorus ; and of Protogenes was wont to say, in all Points he was equal to him, if not above him ; but after all, there was yet one Thing wanting in them all, which was instar omnium, or, however, the Beauty and Life of all, which he only ascribed, and was proud in being the sole Master of himself, viz. his Venus by the Greeks, named ΧΑΡΙΣ a certain peculiar Grace, sometimes called the Air of the Picture, resulting from a due Observation and Concurrence of all the essential Points and Rules requisite in a compleat Picture, accompany’d with an unconstrained and unaffected Facility and Freedom of the Pencil, which together produced such a ravishing Harmony, that made their Works seem to be performed by some divine and unspeakable Way of ART ; and which (as Fr. Junius expresseth it) is not a Perfection of ART, proceeding meerly from ART, but rather a Perfection proceeding from a consummate ART.
HENCE it was that
Apelles admiring the wonderful Pains and Curiosity in each Point in a Picture of Protogenes’s Painting, yet took Occasion from thence to reprehend him for it as a Fault quod nescivit manum tollere de tabula, implying, that a heavy and painful Diligence and Affectation, are destructive of that Comeliness, Beauty and admired Grace, which only a prompt and prosperous Facility proceeding from a found Judgment of ART, can offord unto us.

Quotation

Asclepiodorus, goet van mate, oft proportie.

Quotation

Apelles himself was so ingenuous to own so great a Proficiency therein, as might seem to add Confirmation, while in the Disposition, or Ordinance, he modestly yielded to Amphion ; in the Measures, or Proportions, he subscribed to Aschepiodorus ; and of Protogenes was wont to say, in all Points he was equal to him, if not above him ; but after all, there was yet one Thing wanting in them all, which was instar omnium, or, however, the Beauty and Life of all, which he only ascribed, and was proud in being the sole Master of himself, viz. his Venus by the Greeks, named ΧΑΡΙΣ a certain peculiar Grace, sometimes called the Air of the Picture, resulting from a due Observation and Concurrence of all the essential Points and Rules requisite in a compleat Picture, accompany’d with an unconstrained and unaffected Facility and Freedom of the Pencil, which together produced such a ravishing Harmony, that made their Works seem to be performed by some divine and unspeakable Way of ART ; and which (as Fr. Junius expresseth it) is not a Perfection of ART, proceeding meerly from ART, but rather a Perfection proceeding from a consummate ART.
HENCE it was that
Apelles admiring the wonderful Pains and Curiosity in each Point in a Picture of Protogenes’s Painting, yet took Occasion from thence to reprehend him for it as a Fault quod nescivit manum tollere de tabula, implying, that a heavy and painful Diligence and Affectation, are destructive of that Comeliness, Beauty and admired Grace, which only a prompt and prosperous Facility proceeding from a found Judgment of ART, can offord unto us.

Quotation

{In welchen Studen jeder von den Alten oder antichen bäst qualificirt gewesen.} Es ist dieses bey unserer Kunst gewöhnlich/ auch so wol an den antichen/ als modernen/ zu ersehen/ daß der eine in einem/ der andere in etwas anders/ die wenigsten in allem/ excelliret und Meister gewesen. {Die Griechen.} Dann Apollodorus legte sonderlich der Schönheit zu. Zeuxis machte zu große Köpfe/ ware aber ein künstlicher Obst-Mahler. Eumarus gewöhnte sich/ alles nach dem Leben nachzubilden. Protogenes konte erstlich nur Schiffe mahlen. Apelles war in allem zierlich. Parrhasius ware gut in seinen Umrißen; Daemon, reich von invention; Timanthes verständig in allen seinen Werken/ auch immer verborgenen Sinns und Meinung; Pamphilus, gelehrt; Nicomachus, geschwind; Athenion, tieffsinnig; Nicophanes, sauber und nett; Amulius schön mit Farben; Pausias, munter in Bildung der Kinder und Blumen; Asclepidorius gut in dem messen und in den proportionen; Amphion, von Anordnung, Serapio, vernünftig in großen; Pireikus, in kleinen Sachen; Antiphilus in klein- und großen ; Dyonisius, konte nur Menschen mahlen; Euphranor, alles; Nicias, Thiere/ besonderlich Hunde. Nicophanes, konte wol nach-copiren/ und war in seinen Werken sauber; Mechophanes zu rauh in den Farben; Nealces, gut im ausbilden; Aristides, in affecte ; Clesides, nach dem Leben ; Ludius, in Landschaften.

Quotation

Dewijl het dan vast gaet dat de waere schoonheyd der naturelicker lichaemen maer alleen in de ghevoeghlicheydt deser Harmonie te vinden is, soo volght het oock daer uyt onwedersprekelick, dat de rechte naeboetsinghe deser lichamen voornamelick in het waernemen deser Harmonie gheleghen is. Alle ghedeelten van een stock-beeld behooren schoon te sijn seght Socrates apud Stobaeum Serm. I. wy en staen in de Colossische wercken niet soo seer op de aerdighe netticheyt van elck bysonder ghedeelte, of wy plaghten vele meer op de schoonheyd van ’t gheheele maecksel te letten, seght Strabo Lib. I. Geogr. Die naeboetsinghen worden voor d’allerspottlickste ghehouden, seght Galenus {Lib. i. de Usu partium corporis humani}, de welcke de ghelijckenisse diese in vele ghedeelten waernemen, in de voornaemste versuymen. Parrhasius, Polycletus, en Asclepiodorus sijn d’eerste en voornaemste grondleggers ende onderhouders deser Symmetrie gheweest. Parrhasius was den eersten die de Schilder-konst haere behoorlicke Symmetrie ghegheven heeft. Plin. XXXV.10. Polycletus nam de Symmetrie op het aller naerstighste waer. Plin XXXIV. 8. Asclepiodorus gingh soo meesterlick met sijne stucken te werck, seght den selvighen Plinius {Lib. XXXV. Cap. 10.}, dat sich Apelles grootlicks plaght te verwonderen over de Symmetrie die hy daer in ghebruyckte.

Quotation

Tot noch toe hebben wy d’Ordinantie, die uyt d’Inventie oorspronckelick voordspruyt, aenghemerckt; volght dat wy nu een weynigh handelen van de Dispositie, die ’t werck is van een nauwluysterende Proportie. Daer om schijnt oock dese Dispositie, om de waerheyd te segghen, seer weynigh van de Proportie te verschillen: Want ghelijckse nerghens anders op uyt gaet, dan datse ’t rechte tusschenscheyd der figuren behoorlicker wijse waerneme ende onderhoudt; soo wordtse ten aensien vande groote ghemeynschap diese met de Proportie selver heeft, een Symmetrie in Plinius ghenaemt: Apelles, seght hy {Lib. xxxv. Cap. 10.}, plaght de Symmetrie van Asclepiodorus met groote verwondering t’aenschouwen; Want dit segghende, soo heeft hy daer mede anders niet te verstaen ghegeven, dan dat sich Apelles met den voornoemden Asclepiodorus niet en heeft dorven verghelijcken, Inde maeten, dat is, in ’t waernemen van de tusschen-wijdde diemen in verscheyden figuren behoort t’onderhouden, ghelijck den selvighen autheur in ’t selvighe Capittel is sprekende. Wat dese Dispositie belanght, men kanse aen gheen sekere ghesette regulen verbinden; ons ooge heeft daer in ’t meeste bedrijf:

Quotation

Mais establissons auparavant nostre cinquiesme partie touchant la Collocation ou Position régulière des Figures dans le Tableau, puisqu’elle est la Base de tout l’Edifice de la Peinture, et pour ainsi dire le lien et l’assemblage des quatre premieres, qui, sans celle-cy, n’ont ny forme, ny subsistance : […]
[…] un Peintre auroit travaillé en vain, et perdu son temps, si après avoir satisfait aux quatre premières Parties, il demeuroit court en cette dernière, où consiste toute l’Eurithmie de l’Art et le Magistère de la Peinture : parce qu’il est inutile d’avoir inventé et composé un Sujet ; et de s’estre estudié à rechercher la beauté, et la juste proportion de chaque figure ; d’estre excellent coloriste ; de savoir donner les Ombres, et les Lumières à tous les corps, avec leurs teintes, et leurs couleurs naturelles ; et de posseder, encore avec cela, le divin Talent de l’Expression des Mouvemens de l’esprit, et des passions, (qui est comme l’Ame de la peinture), si, après toutes ces nobles Parties, on se trouve depourveu d’intelligence au fait de la position reguliere des Figures dans le Tableau.
Il faut donc conclure, que si les autres, ou toutes ensembles, ou prises chacune à part, sont utiles et avantageuses à un Peintre, celle-cy luy est absolument necessaire.

Car quoy qu’un Tableau n’ait pas entièrement satisfait à quelqu’une des quatre premières Parties, ou que mesmes il soit foible, et en quelque sorte deffectueux en toutes ensemble ; neanmoins si cette derniere, dont nous traitons, s’y trouve à sa perfection, l’ouvrage sera toûjours estimable et digne d’un Peintre : parce que l’Ordre est la source, et le vray principe des Sciences : Et pour le regard des Arts, il a cela de particulier, et de merveilleux, qu’il est le père de la Beauté, et qu’il donne mesme de la grace aux choses les plus mediocres, et les rend considerables.
Voyons en quoy consiste cette partie si importante, et par maniere de dire, si Totale, qui acheve non seulement de former un Peintre, mais qui comprend tout ce que la Peinture a de scientifique, et qui la tire d’entre les Arts mechaniques pour luy donner le reng parmi les Sciences.
Les Geometres, qui sont les vrais maistres de cette question, pour en exprimer l’Intelligence, se servent du nom d’Optique, voulant dire ce terme-là, que c’est l’Art de voir les choses par la raison, et avec les yeux de l’Entendement : car on seroit bien impertinent de s’imaginer que les yeux du corps fussent d’eux-mesmes capables d’une si sublime operation, que de pouvoir estre juges de la beauté et de l’excellence d’un tableau.
Et comme le Peintre fait profession d’imiter les choses selon qu’il les void, il est certain que s'il voit mal, il  les représentera conforme[s] à sa mauvaise imagination, et fera une mauvaise peinture ; si bien qu’avant que de prendre le crayon et les pinceaux, il faut qu’il ajuste son œil avec le raisonnement, par les principes qui enseignent à voir les choses, non seulement ainsi qu’elles sont en elles-mesmes, mais encore selon qu’elles doivent estre figurées. Car ce seroit bien souvent une lourde faute de les peindre precisément comme l’œil les void, quoique cela semble un paradoxe.
Or cet Art si necessaire, que les sçavans ont nommé l’Optique, et que les Peintres, et tous les Desseignateurs appellent communement la Perspective, donne des moyens infaillibles de representer precisément sur une surface (telle qu’est la toile d’un tableau, une parois, une feuille de papier, ou telle autre chose)
tout ce que l’œil void et peut comprendre d’une seule œillade, pendant qu’il demeure ferme en un mesme lieu. […] je monstreray icy par des exemples, et par l’examen critique de diverses Pieces qui se voyent en estampe aprés Raphael (le plus celebre des Peintres Modernes, et le plus exact en ses Ouvrages) de quelle importance est cette Perspective ou collocation reguliere des Figures dans un Tableau ; vû que c’est par elle qu’on decide precisément, et avec demonstration, ce qui est bien, et ce qui est mal.
[…]

Quotation

Apelles himself was so ingenuous to own so great a Proficiency therein, as might seem to add Confirmation, while in the Disposition, or Ordinance, he modestly yielded to Amphion ; in the Measures, or Proportions, he subscribed to Aschepiodorus ; and of Protogenes was wont to say, in all Points he was equal to him, if not above him ; but after all, there was yet one Thing wanting in them all, which was instar omnium, or, however, the Beauty and Life of all, which he only ascribed, and was proud in being the sole Master of himself, viz. his Venus by the Greeks, named ΧΑΡΙΣ a certain peculiar Grace, sometimes called the Air of the Picture, resulting from a due Observation and Concurrence of all the essential Points and Rules requisite in a compleat Picture, accompany’d with an unconstrained and unaffected Facility and Freedom of the Pencil, which together produced such a ravishing Harmony, that made their Works seem to be performed by some divine and unspeakable Way of ART ; and which (as Fr. Junius expresseth it) is not a Perfection of ART, proceeding meerly from ART, but rather a Perfection proceeding from a consummate ART.
HENCE it was that
Apelles admiring the wonderful Pains and Curiosity in each Point in a Picture of Protogenes’s Painting, yet took Occasion from thence to reprehend him for it as a Fault quod nescivit manum tollere de tabula, implying, that a heavy and painful Diligence and Affectation, are destructive of that Comeliness, Beauty and admired Grace, which only a prompt and prosperous Facility proceeding from a found Judgment of ART, can offord unto us.

Quotation

Pour ce qui concerne la Proportion, c’est-à-dire la Symmetrie ou correspondance du Tout avec ses parties, c’est une chose facile, et à la portée de tous les esprits : ce qui fait que l’ignorance est sans excuse, parce qu’on peut l’acquerir presque sans peine, et mesmes par une estude entierement mechanique : mais le seul moyen de parvenir à sa perfection, et d’en avoir une connoissance bien esclairée, c’est d’aller par le chemin de la Geométrie, qui est la source de tous les Arts. […]

Quotation

Tot noch toe hebben wy d’Ordinantie, die uyt d’Inventie oorspronckelick voordspruyt, aenghemerckt; volght dat wy nu een weynigh handelen van de Dispositie, die ’t werck is van een nauwluysterende Proportie. Daer om schijnt oock dese Dispositie, om de waerheyd te segghen, seer weynigh van de Proportie te verschillen: Want ghelijckse nerghens anders op uyt gaet, dan datse ’t rechte tusschenscheyd der figuren behoorlicker wijse waerneme ende onderhoudt; soo wordtse ten aensien vande groote ghemeynschap diese met de Proportie selver heeft, een Symmetrie in Plinius ghenaemt: Apelles, seght hy {Lib. xxxv. Cap. 10.}, plaght de Symmetrie van Asclepiodorus met groote verwondering t’aenschouwen; Want dit segghende, soo heeft hy daer mede anders niet te verstaen ghegeven, dan dat sich Apelles met den voornoemden Asclepiodorus niet en heeft dorven verghelijcken, Inde maeten, dat is, in ’t waernemen van de tusschen-wijdde diemen in verscheyden figuren behoort t’onderhouden, ghelijck den selvighen autheur in ’t selvighe Capittel is sprekende. Wat dese Dispositie belanght, men kanse aen gheen sekere ghesette regulen verbinden; ons ooge heeft daer in ’t meeste bedrijf:

Quotation

Asclepiodorus, goet van mate, oft proportie.

Quotation

Pour ce qui concerne la Proportion, c’est-à-dire la Symmetrie ou correspondance du Tout avec ses parties, c’est une chose facile, et à la portée de tous les esprits : ce qui fait que l’ignorance est sans excuse, parce qu’on peut l’acquerir presque sans peine, et mesmes par une estude entierement mechanique : mais le seul moyen de parvenir à sa perfection, et d’en avoir une connoissance bien esclairée, c’est d’aller par le chemin de la Geométrie, qui est la source de tous les Arts. […]

Quotation

Apelles himself was so ingenuous to own so great a Proficiency therein, as might seem to add Confirmation, while in the Disposition, or Ordinance, he modestly yielded to Amphion ; in the Measures, or Proportions, he subscribed to Aschepiodorus ; and of Protogenes was wont to say, in all Points he was equal to him, if not above him ; but after all, there was yet one Thing wanting in them all, which was instar omnium, or, however, the Beauty and Life of all, which he only ascribed, and was proud in being the sole Master of himself, viz. his Venus by the Greeks, named ΧΑΡΙΣ a certain peculiar Grace, sometimes called the Air of the Picture, resulting from a due Observation and Concurrence of all the essential Points and Rules requisite in a compleat Picture, accompany’d with an unconstrained and unaffected Facility and Freedom of the Pencil, which together produced such a ravishing Harmony, that made their Works seem to be performed by some divine and unspeakable Way of ART ; and which (as Fr. Junius expresseth it) is not a Perfection of ART, proceeding meerly from ART, but rather a Perfection proceeding from a consummate ART.
HENCE it was that
Apelles admiring the wonderful Pains and Curiosity in each Point in a Picture of Protogenes’s Painting, yet took Occasion from thence to reprehend him for it as a Fault quod nescivit manum tollere de tabula, implying, that a heavy and painful Diligence and Affectation, are destructive of that Comeliness, Beauty and admired Grace, which only a prompt and prosperous Facility proceeding from a found Judgment of ART, can offord unto us.

Quotation

Tot noch toe hebben wy d’Ordinantie, die uyt d’Inventie oorspronckelick voordspruyt, aenghemerckt; volght dat wy nu een weynigh handelen van de Dispositie, die ’t werck is van een nauwluysterende Proportie. Daer om schijnt oock dese Dispositie, om de waerheyd te segghen, seer weynigh van de Proportie te verschillen: Want ghelijckse nerghens anders op uyt gaet, dan datse ’t rechte tusschenscheyd der figuren behoorlicker wijse waerneme ende onderhoudt; soo wordtse ten aensien vande groote ghemeynschap diese met de Proportie selver heeft, een Symmetrie in Plinius ghenaemt: Apelles, seght hy {Lib. xxxv. Cap. 10.}, plaght de Symmetrie van Asclepiodorus met groote verwondering t’aenschouwen; Want dit segghende, soo heeft hy daer mede anders niet te verstaen ghegeven, dan dat sich Apelles met den voornoemden Asclepiodorus niet en heeft dorven verghelijcken, Inde maeten, dat is, in ’t waernemen van de tusschen-wijdde diemen in verscheyden figuren behoort t’onderhouden, ghelijck den selvighen autheur in ’t selvighe Capittel is sprekende. Wat dese Dispositie belanght, men kanse aen gheen sekere ghesette regulen verbinden; ons ooge heeft daer in ’t meeste bedrijf:

Quotation

Dewijl het dan vast gaet dat de waere schoonheyd der naturelicker lichaemen maer alleen in de ghevoeghlicheydt deser Harmonie te vinden is, soo volght het oock daer uyt onwedersprekelick, dat de rechte naeboetsinghe deser lichamen voornamelick in het waernemen deser Harmonie gheleghen is. Alle ghedeelten van een stock-beeld behooren schoon te sijn seght Socrates apud Stobaeum Serm. I. wy en staen in de Colossische wercken niet soo seer op de aerdighe netticheyt van elck bysonder ghedeelte, of wy plaghten vele meer op de schoonheyd van ’t gheheele maecksel te letten, seght Strabo Lib. I. Geogr. Die naeboetsinghen worden voor d’allerspottlickste ghehouden, seght Galenus {Lib. i. de Usu partium corporis humani}, de welcke de ghelijckenisse diese in vele ghedeelten waernemen, in de voornaemste versuymen. Parrhasius, Polycletus, en Asclepiodorus sijn d’eerste en voornaemste grondleggers ende onderhouders deser Symmetrie gheweest. Parrhasius was den eersten die de Schilder-konst haere behoorlicke Symmetrie ghegheven heeft. Plin. XXXV.10. Polycletus nam de Symmetrie op het aller naerstighste waer. Plin XXXIV. 8. Asclepiodorus gingh soo meesterlick met sijne stucken te werck, seght den selvighen Plinius {Lib. XXXV. Cap. 10.}, dat sich Apelles grootlicks plaght te verwonderen over de Symmetrie die hy daer in ghebruyckte.

Quotation

Pour ce qui concerne la Proportion, c’est-à-dire la Symmetrie ou correspondance du Tout avec ses parties, c’est une chose facile, et à la portée de tous les esprits : ce qui fait que l’ignorance est sans excuse, parce qu’on peut l’acquerir presque sans peine, et mesmes par une estude entierement mechanique : mais le seul moyen de parvenir à sa perfection, et d’en avoir une connoissance bien esclairée, c’est d’aller par le chemin de la Geométrie, qui est la source de tous les Arts. […]

Quotation

Dewijl het dan vast gaet dat de waere schoonheyd der naturelicker lichaemen maer alleen in de ghevoeghlicheydt deser Harmonie te vinden is, soo volght het oock daer uyt onwedersprekelick, dat de rechte naeboetsinghe deser lichamen voornamelick in het waernemen deser Harmonie gheleghen is. Alle ghedeelten van een stock-beeld behooren schoon te sijn seght Socrates apud Stobaeum Serm. I. wy en staen in de Colossische wercken niet soo seer op de aerdighe netticheyt van elck bysonder ghedeelte, of wy plaghten vele meer op de schoonheyd van ’t gheheele maecksel te letten, seght Strabo Lib. I. Geogr. Die naeboetsinghen worden voor d’allerspottlickste ghehouden, seght Galenus {Lib. i. de Usu partium corporis humani}, de welcke de ghelijckenisse diese in vele ghedeelten waernemen, in de voornaemste versuymen. Parrhasius, Polycletus, en Asclepiodorus sijn d’eerste en voornaemste grondleggers ende onderhouders deser Symmetrie gheweest. Parrhasius was den eersten die de Schilder-konst haere behoorlicke Symmetrie ghegheven heeft. Plin. XXXV.10. Polycletus nam de Symmetrie op het aller naerstighste waer. Plin XXXIV. 8. Asclepiodorus gingh soo meesterlick met sijne stucken te werck, seght den selvighen Plinius {Lib. XXXV. Cap. 10.}, dat sich Apelles grootlicks plaght te verwonderen over de Symmetrie die hy daer in ghebruyckte.

Quotation

Tot noch toe hebben wy d’Ordinantie, die uyt d’Inventie oorspronckelick voordspruyt, aenghemerckt; volght dat wy nu een weynigh handelen van de Dispositie, die ’t werck is van een nauwluysterende Proportie. Daer om schijnt oock dese Dispositie, om de waerheyd te segghen, seer weynigh van de Proportie te verschillen: Want ghelijckse nerghens anders op uyt gaet, dan datse ’t rechte tusschenscheyd der figuren behoorlicker wijse waerneme ende onderhoudt; soo wordtse ten aensien vande groote ghemeynschap diese met de Proportie selver heeft, een Symmetrie in Plinius ghenaemt: Apelles, seght hy {Lib. xxxv. Cap. 10.}, plaght de Symmetrie van Asclepiodorus met groote verwondering t’aenschouwen; Want dit segghende, soo heeft hy daer mede anders niet te verstaen ghegeven, dan dat sich Apelles met den voornoemden Asclepiodorus niet en heeft dorven verghelijcken, Inde maeten, dat is, in ’t waernemen van de tusschen-wijdde diemen in verscheyden figuren behoort t’onderhouden, ghelijck den selvighen autheur in ’t selvighe Capittel is sprekende. Wat dese Dispositie belanght, men kanse aen gheen sekere ghesette regulen verbinden; ons ooge heeft daer in ’t meeste bedrijf:

Quotation

Asclepiodorus, goet van mate, oft proportie.

Quotation

Asclepiodorus, goet van mate, oft proportie.

Quotation

Dewijl het dan vast gaet dat de waere schoonheyd der naturelicker lichaemen maer alleen in de ghevoeghlicheydt deser Harmonie te vinden is, soo volght het oock daer uyt onwedersprekelick, dat de rechte naeboetsinghe deser lichamen voornamelick in het waernemen deser Harmonie gheleghen is. Alle ghedeelten van een stock-beeld behooren schoon te sijn seght Socrates apud Stobaeum Serm. I. wy en staen in de Colossische wercken niet soo seer op de aerdighe netticheyt van elck bysonder ghedeelte, of wy plaghten vele meer op de schoonheyd van ’t gheheele maecksel te letten, seght Strabo Lib. I. Geogr. Die naeboetsinghen worden voor d’allerspottlickste ghehouden, seght Galenus {Lib. i. de Usu partium corporis humani}, de welcke de ghelijckenisse diese in vele ghedeelten waernemen, in de voornaemste versuymen. Parrhasius, Polycletus, en Asclepiodorus sijn d’eerste en voornaemste grondleggers ende onderhouders deser Symmetrie gheweest. Parrhasius was den eersten die de Schilder-konst haere behoorlicke Symmetrie ghegheven heeft. Plin. XXXV.10. Polycletus nam de Symmetrie op het aller naerstighste waer. Plin XXXIV. 8. Asclepiodorus gingh soo meesterlick met sijne stucken te werck, seght den selvighen Plinius {Lib. XXXV. Cap. 10.}, dat sich Apelles grootlicks plaght te verwonderen over de Symmetrie die hy daer in ghebruyckte.

Quotation

Tot noch toe hebben wy d’Ordinantie, die uyt d’Inventie oorspronckelick voordspruyt, aenghemerckt; volght dat wy nu een weynigh handelen van de Dispositie, die ’t werck is van een nauwluysterende Proportie. Daer om schijnt oock dese Dispositie, om de waerheyd te segghen, seer weynigh van de Proportie te verschillen: Want ghelijckse nerghens anders op uyt gaet, dan datse ’t rechte tusschenscheyd der figuren behoorlicker wijse waerneme ende onderhoudt; soo wordtse ten aensien vande groote ghemeynschap diese met de Proportie selver heeft, een Symmetrie in Plinius ghenaemt: Apelles, seght hy {Lib. xxxv. Cap. 10.}, plaght de Symmetrie van Asclepiodorus met groote verwondering t’aenschouwen; Want dit segghende, soo heeft hy daer mede anders niet te verstaen ghegeven, dan dat sich Apelles met den voornoemden Asclepiodorus niet en heeft dorven verghelijcken, Inde maeten, dat is, in ’t waernemen van de tusschen-wijdde diemen in verscheyden figuren behoort t’onderhouden, ghelijck den selvighen autheur in ’t selvighe Capittel is sprekende. Wat dese Dispositie belanght, men kanse aen gheen sekere ghesette regulen verbinden; ons ooge heeft daer in ’t meeste bedrijf:

Quotation

{In welchen Studen jeder von den Alten oder antichen bäst qualificirt gewesen.} Es ist dieses bey unserer Kunst gewöhnlich/ auch so wol an den antichen/ als modernen/ zu ersehen/ daß der eine in einem/ der andere in etwas anders/ die wenigsten in allem/ excelliret und Meister gewesen. {Die Griechen.} Dann Apollodorus legte sonderlich der Schönheit zu. Zeuxis machte zu große Köpfe/ ware aber ein künstlicher Obst-Mahler. Eumarus gewöhnte sich/ alles nach dem Leben nachzubilden. Protogenes konte erstlich nur Schiffe mahlen. Apelles war in allem zierlich. Parrhasius ware gut in seinen Umrißen; Daemon, reich von invention; Timanthes verständig in allen seinen Werken/ auch immer verborgenen Sinns und Meinung; Pamphilus, gelehrt; Nicomachus, geschwind; Athenion, tieffsinnig; Nicophanes, sauber und nett; Amulius schön mit Farben; Pausias, munter in Bildung der Kinder und Blumen; Asclepidorius gut in dem messen und in den proportionen; Amphion, von Anordnung, Serapio, vernünftig in großen; Pireikus, in kleinen Sachen; Antiphilus in klein- und großen ; Dyonisius, konte nur Menschen mahlen; Euphranor, alles; Nicias, Thiere/ besonderlich Hunde. Nicophanes, konte wol nach-copiren/ und war in seinen Werken sauber; Mechophanes zu rauh in den Farben; Nealces, gut im ausbilden; Aristides, in affecte ; Clesides, nach dem Leben ; Ludius, in Landschaften.

Quotation

Apelles himself was so ingenuous to own so great a Proficiency therein, as might seem to add Confirmation, while in the Disposition, or Ordinance, he modestly yielded to Amphion ; in the Measures, or Proportions, he subscribed to Aschepiodorus ; and of Protogenes was wont to say, in all Points he was equal to him, if not above him ; but after all, there was yet one Thing wanting in them all, which was instar omnium, or, however, the Beauty and Life of all, which he only ascribed, and was proud in being the sole Master of himself, viz. his Venus by the Greeks, named ΧΑΡΙΣ a certain peculiar Grace, sometimes called the Air of the Picture, resulting from a due Observation and Concurrence of all the essential Points and Rules requisite in a compleat Picture, accompany’d with an unconstrained and unaffected Facility and Freedom of the Pencil, which together produced such a ravishing Harmony, that made their Works seem to be performed by some divine and unspeakable Way of ART ; and which (as Fr. Junius expresseth it) is not a Perfection of ART, proceeding meerly from ART, but rather a Perfection proceeding from a consummate ART.
HENCE it was that
Apelles admiring the wonderful Pains and Curiosity in each Point in a Picture of Protogenes’s Painting, yet took Occasion from thence to reprehend him for it as a Fault quod nescivit manum tollere de tabula, implying, that a heavy and painful Diligence and Affectation, are destructive of that Comeliness, Beauty and admired Grace, which only a prompt and prosperous Facility proceeding from a found Judgment of ART, can offord unto us.