NABOOTSING (n. f.)

IMITATIO (lat.) · IMITATION (eng.) · IMITATION (fra.) · IMITATION (deu.) · NACHAHMUNG (deu.) · NACHBILDUNG (deu.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
/ · IMITATIO (lat.) · IMITATION (eng.) · NACHAHMUNG (deu.) · NACHMACHUNG (deu.)

FILTERS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

4 sources
9 quotations

Quotation

Dit is dan dese naeboetsinghe, die men ghemeyndelick d'Imitatie noemt, uyt welcke de Teycken-Konst, de Schilder-Konst, de Giet-Konst en al 'andere Konsten van desen aerd voord-spruyten. Oock so is 't dat dese Imitatie van Philostratus {in proaemio Iconum} genaemt wordt een seer oude vont ende met de Nature selver wonderlick wel overeen komende. […]Oock soo en moghen wy in 't minste niet eens twijfelen of 't grootste deel der Konsten, ghelijck den selvighen Quintilianus elders {orat. Instit. Lib. X. cap. 2} steunt op d'imitatie, jae dat noch meer is, 't gantsche belydt onses levens bestaet daerin dat wy altijdt vaerdighlick naetrachten, 't ghene wy in andere hoogh achten.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] This is than that imitation, which one commonly calls imitation, from which the Art of Drawing, the Art of Painting, the Art of Casting and all the other Arts of this earth spring forth. Just as this Imitation is called by Philostratus {…} a very old source and wonderfully similar to Nature itself. […]Just like that we cannot doubt in the least or 'the larger part of the Art, like the same Quintilianus [says] elsewhere {…}, leans on Imitation, yes even more so, the whole ruling of our lives consists therein that we always capably aim to that which we esteem highly in others.

For the translation, I could not find a suitable synonym for Imitation, that would reflect the sense of the Dutch term 'nabootsing'/'imitatie'. [MO]

imitatie

term translated by / in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 4 in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 8
term translated by / in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 4 in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 8

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

De schoonheyd des lichaems, seght Cicero {lib. I de officiis}, beweeght onse ooghen door een bequaeme t'saemenschickinghe der leden; hy vermaeckt ons daer mede voornemelick, dat alle ghedeelten door een aenghenaeme lieffelickheyd met malkanderen over-een komen. Ghelijck het dan gheen wonder en is dat wy eenen sonderlinghen lust scheppen inde schoonheyd der naturelicker lichaemen, soo is het veel min verwonderenswaerd dat ons de Konstige naboetsinge deser schoonheyd noch al beter behaeght dan de natuerelicke schoonheyd selver; niet alleen omdat wy daer in bemercken hoe gheluckighlick de Konst met de nature strijd, maer ook omdat ons ghemoed sich eenmael door dese beschouwinghe vervrolickt vindende sijne blijschap niet langer en kan binnen houden,

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] The beauty of the body, says Cicero {…}, moves our eyes through a competent arrangement of members; it mostly amuses us by this [NDR: the fact], that all parts correspond to each other by a pleasant charm. Like it is no wonder that we gain delight in the beauty of natural bodies, it is much less remarkable that the artful imitation of this beauty pleases us even more than the natural beauty itself; not only because we recognize how happily the Art competes with nature, but also because once our mind finds itself cheered up by this consideration it can no longer hold in its joy.

term translated by IMITATIO in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 45
term translated by IMITATION in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 78

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

Dewijl het dan vast gaet dat de waere schoonheyd der naturelicker lichaemen maer alleen in de ghevoeghlicheydt deser Harmonie te vinden is, soo volght het oock daer uyt onwedersprekelick, dat de rechte naeboetsinghe deser lichamen voornamelick in het waernemen deser Harmonie gheleghen is. Alle ghedeelten van een stock-beeld behooren schoon te sijn seght Socrates apud Stobaeum Serm. I. wy en staen in de Colossische wercken niet soo seer op de aerdighe netticheyt van elck bysonder ghedeelte, of wy plaghten vele meer op de schoonheyd van ’t gheheele maecksel te letten, seght Strabo Lib. I. Geogr. Die naeboetsinghen worden voor d’allerspottlickste ghehouden, seght Galenus {Lib. i. de Usu partium corporis humani}, de welcke de ghelijckenisse diese in vele ghedeelten waernemen, in de voornaemste versuymen. Parrhasius, Polycletus, en Asclepiodorus sijn d’eerste en voornaemste grondleggers ende onderhouders deser Symmetrie gheweest. Parrhasius was den eersten die de Schilder-konst haere behoorlicke Symmetrie ghegheven heeft. Plin. XXXV.10. Polycletus nam de Symmetrie op het aller naerstighste waer. Plin XXXIV. 8. Asclepiodorus gingh soo meesterlick met sijne stucken te werck, seght den selvighen Plinius {Lib. XXXV. Cap. 10.}, dat sich Apelles grootlicks plaght te verwonderen over de Symmetrie die hy daer in ghebruyckte.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] While it is certain that the true beauty of the natural bodies can only be found in the propriety of this Harmony, as such it follows undeniably from this as well, that the true imitation of these bodies consists mainly in the observation of this Harmony. All parts of a statue have to be beautiful says Socrates apud Stobaeum Serm. I. we do not insist so much on the nice neatness of each separate part in the Colossal works, but we tend to pay much more attention to the beauty of the whole production, says Strabo Lib. I. Geogr. Those imitations are thought to be the most ridiculous, says Galenus {…, that generally neglect the resemblance that they observe in many parts. Parrhaisus, Polycletus and Asclepiodorus have been the first and principal founders and observers of this Symmetry. Parrhaisus was the first who gave the Art of Painting its appropriate Symmetry. Plin. XXXV.10. Polycletus observed the Symmetry very dilligently. Plin XXXIV.8. Asclepiodorus approached his work so masterfully, says the same Plinius {…}, that Apelles used to be greatly amazed about the Symmetry that he applied in it.

term translated by IMITATIO in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 156-157

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

Alhoewel een Beeld alle de waerachtighe linien der afghebeelder dingen uytdruckt; nochtans derft het de rechte kracht der dinghen selver, als wesende onbeweghelick en sonder eenigh roersel, seght Tertullianus Lib. II. adversus Marcionem. Het manghelt de kley-stekerye, seght Apuleius {In Apologia.}, aen de behaeghelicke lustigheyd die het leven dapper plaght te verwackeren; het schort de steenen aen de Coleur; het liegt de Schilderyen aen stijvigheyd; en alle dese verscheydene soorten van naeboetsinghe hebben ’t roersel ghebreck, ’t welck de levende ghelijckenisse der dinghen met een sonderlinghe ghetrouwigheyd plaght te vertoonen. Ghelijck het oversulcks altijd waerachtigh is dat d’afghebeelde dinghen ’t naturelicke roersel derven, soo plaghtense oock somtijds heel end’al van het naegheboetste roersel ontbloot te sijn; ghemerckt d’aller oudste en d’eerste Meesters in haere wercken een gantsch swaere, lompe, ende onbeweghelicke maniere volghden, sonder eenigh levendighe roersel in de selvighe uyt te storten.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Although an Image only expresses the true lines of the depicted things; it nevertheless lacks the true power of the things themselves, like being unmoving and with any stir, says Tertullianus (…). The clay-sculpting misses, says Apuleius, the comforting delight that life strongly tends to incite; the stones lack Colour; the Paintings lack stiffness; and all these different sorts of imitation miss the stirring, which the living similitudees of things tend to show with a remarkable faithfulness. Like it is moreover always true that the depicted things lack the natural movement, as such they sometimes also are completely devoid of the imitated movement; seen that the oldest and first Masters followed a rather heavy, akward and still manner, without putting any lively movement in it.

term translated by / in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 178 in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 290
term translated by / in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 178 in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 290

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

{Opmerking over de Volg-Konst.} Staet oock noch voor af, aen te mercken datmen de Kinderen door de Konst van navolgingh of nabotsingh tot alles dat de Schilder-Konst aengaet, kan aenleyden, want dewijl het onmogelijck is alles dat de Teycken-kunde vermagh te doen, in ‘t bysonder voor te schrijven, soo brenght de Volgh-kunst, de Teycken-kunde een bysondere algemeene hulpe toe. Waer vintmen doch eenen Schilder (seyt Quintilianus), die alles ’t gene inde natuere voorvalt, heeft leeren af-teyckenen, nochtans en vint een konstigh Meester die de rechte maniere van navolgingh heeft, sich noyt verlegen, alles wat hem voorkomt, aerdigh af te beelden. Na datwe dan nu de Jonge Leerlingen, volgens d’onderwijsinge vande kleyne begintselen hebben leeren aen stoelen en bancken gaen, en datse door de eerse wijse van doen, het beginstel van navolgingh hebben verkreghen, soo moet men haer seer neerstigh en langhe besigh houden in het na-teyckenen van goede, welgehandelde en uytvoerighe Teyckeningen, welcke wy oordeelen veel nutter en bequamer te zijn dan eenige Print-kunst; {Teyckenen na Teyckeningen seer nut.} de reden daer van is om datse in een goede Teyckeningh niet alleen en sien de schickinghe, vaste Teyckeningh, verstandighe witheydt der omtrecken, dagh en schaduwe, toetsen en hooghsels, maer sy sien daer met eenen oock de maniere van handelinghe en Teyckenachtighen aert, ’t welcke sy in een Print niet en sien, en by gevolgh daer oock niet uyt leeren konnen, dan met langen tijdt en grooten verdrietigen arbeyt, sonder dickwils een vaste maniere te bekomen, maer maecken dat hunne dingen nu sus, dan soo, luck raeck, komen uyt te vallen.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] {Remark about the Art of Imitation.} Beforehand we should point out that one can stimulate Children to anything that concerns the Art of Painting by means of the Art of following or imitation, because although it is impossible to prescribe everything that the Art of Drawing entails separately, as such the Art of Imitation gives great assistance to the Art of Drawing. Where can one find a Painter (says Quintilian), who has learned to draw everything that occurs in nature, yet an artful Master who has the right manner of imitation is never wanting to nicely depict all that occurs to him. After we have gotten the young pupils going with the instruction of the small principles of imitation, and that they have obtained the principle of imitation by this first action, as such they should be kept busy diligently and long with the drawing after good well-executed and comprehensive Drawings, which we believe to be much more useful and adequate than any Art of Print; {Drawing after Drawings is very useful.} the reason for this is that in a good Drawing they will not only see the composition, steady Drawing, sensible whiteness of the contours, light and shadow, touches and highlights, but they will also see the manner of treatment and nature of drawing, which they cannot see and therefore cannot learn from a Print, except after a long time and great sad labour, often without obtaining a steady manner, causing that their things will sometimes occur like this or that, haphazardly.

This section is not included in the English translation. [MO]

navolgingh · volgh-kunst

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

T: […] Maar zeg eens wat is Konst, en waar in bestaat uw oeffening?
S: Alles dat my voor komt te Schilderen, wat vraagen is dat?
T: Uyt de Geest ook?
S: Wat uyt de geest, wisje wasje, neen het Leeven, de Naarbootsinge der algemeene Natuur is myn Studie.
T: Hebt gy wel naar Playster leeren Teekenen?
S: Drie jaar heb ik geteekend, maar ‘k weet van geen playster, heb ook by myn patroon niets daar van gezien, maar na fraaje printen van Blommert, Berchem, Breugel, Rubens, en andere braave Konstenaars.
T: Naar Raphael, Karats, en Pousyn ook?
S: ‘k Geloof van ja, ik heb’er zoo naauw niet opgelet. Maar wel na Teekeningen van myn Meester.
T: Hebt gy meede op ’t Kollegie naar het Naakt Model geteekent?
S: Neen.
T: Wat meent gy dan met het Leeven te Schilderen?
S: Na Leevendige menschen, Man, Vrou, Kind, Schaapen, Ossen, Koeyen, Stoelen, Kassen; ja alles dat te pas komt.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] T [ndr: draughtsmen]: […] But tell me, what is Art, and of what consists your practice? S [ndr: painter]: Everything that I want to paint, what kind of question is this? T: Also from the Mind? S: From the mind, what a nonsense [ndr: with the expression ‘wisje wasje’, De Lairesse brushes painting from the mind aside], no the life, the imitation of the general nature is my study. T: But have you learned to draw after plaster? S: Three years I have drawn, but I know of no plaster, nor have I seen any of it with my patron, but after beautiful prints by Bloemaert, Berchem, Breugel, Rubens and other good artists. T: After Raphael, Carracci and Poussin as well? S: I guess so, yes, I have not considered it much. But definitely after the drawings of my master. T: Have you also drawn during the classes after the nude model? S: No. T: Then what do you mean with painting with the life? S: After living people, man, woman, child, sheep, oxes, cows, chairs, cupboards; yes everything that might come of use.

term translated by NACHAHMUNG

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

De moderne Teekenkonst is, diemen van jongs op leerd, door een natuurlyk begrip, en oeffening der handen, dewelke zo noodzaakelyk is, datmen onmoogelyk tot de tweede kan koomen, dan alvoorens haar, korrekt en vast te kennen, als zynde de grondslag van t’geheel. […] is voor zo ver een goed modern teekenaar, dewyl niet meer vereyscht wordt, als een eenvoudige imitatie, of naarbootzing, zonder het minste af, of toe te doen; Zy vraagt, nog wijst niet, wat goed en kwaad is in de voorwerpen? maar laat haar vergnoegen, als zy zo ver zyn, wyzende hen lieden dan verders, een trap hooger, naar haar Zuster Antik, die ouwer en wyzer is: Dat’s voor zoveel de moderne, en Algemeene Teekenkonst betreft, als zynde noodzaakelyk.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] The modern art of drawing is that which one learns since childhood, through a natural understanding and practice of the hands, which is so necessary, that one can impossibly obtain the second, before one knows her correctly and steadily, as the basis of it all. […] is thus far a good modern draughtsman, as nothing else is demanded but a simple imitation, without deleting or adding anything; She does not ask or points out, what is good or bad in the objects, but limits herself, when they have advanced this much, to point them ahead, to a next step, to her sister Antiquity, who is older and wiser: That’s it for as far as the modern and general art of drawing is concerned, being necessary.

imitatie

term translated by /

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

t Is waar, dit vertoont zich maar alleen in schildery: maar is de Schilderkonst niet een naarbootsinge van 't leeven, 't geen een mensch kan bekooren of doen walgen?

[D'après DE LAIRESSE 1787, p. 286:] C’est vrai, cela se représente seulement dans une peinture : mais est-ce que la Peinture n’est pas une imitation de la vie, ce qui peut charmer ou révulser une personne ?

term translated by IMITATION
term translated by NACHAHMUNG

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

Invoegen het Modern schilderen voor geen konst geacht kan worden, wanneer de natuur enkelyk gevolgd is: want dan is het slechts een onvolmaakte nabootsinge, of wel een gebrekkelyke na-äapinge. Ja alwaar het schoon dat men een zaak natuurlyk uitgebeeld had, wel getekend, geordineerd, en voegelijk geschikt; landaard, manieren en gebruik, modes en dragten, als mede de koleuren duidelyk waargenomen en vertoond; zoo zal zulks nochtans, door rechte kenders voor geen konstig werk aangezien worden: maar als de Konst met de Natuur, wanneer zy door een schranderen en verheevenen geest van haare gebrekkelykheden gezuiverd en verbeterd is, gepaard, de overhand hebben, en dan de voornoemde deugden hier by gevoegd zyn, zal het zekerlyk een volmaakt en deftig Konststuk voortbrengen […] De nooitvolpreezene Anthoni van Dyk was in het Antiek zo wel uitmuntende als in 't Modern; hebbende in het laatste zo wel als in het eerste de voorzeide drie bevalligheden gelyk een staale wet gevolgd, […]

[D'après DE LAIRESSE 1738, p. 134:] The modem Painting can therefore not be accounted Art, when Nature is simply followed ; which is a meer imperfect Imitation or defective aping her. Even, were a Thing represented ever so natural, well-designed and properly ordered ; the Condition, Manners and Cuftom of the Country well obferved, and the Colouring most exact:, yet the Knowing will not think it artful: But when Nature is corrected and improved by a judicious Master, and the aforefaid Qualities joined to it, the Painting must then be noble and perfect [...] Van Dyk, never enough to be commended, gained Excellence in the antique as well as the modern Manner, by strictly following the aforesaid three Graces in both […]

term translated by IMITATION
term translated by NACHAHMUNG

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → statut de l'oeuvre : copie, original...