CAMPIDOGLIO, Michelangelo (Michele Pace del Campidoglio) ( v. 1610-v. 1670 )

CAMPIDOGLIO, Michelangelo (Michele Pace del Campidoglio) ( v. 1610-v. 1670 )

ISNI:0000000084579005 Getty:500022326

Quotation

I have many times observ’d with a great deal of Pleasure the admirable Composition (besides other Excellencies) of a Fruit-piece of Michelangelo Compadoglio, which I have had many Years. The principal Light is near the Centre (not Exactly there, for those Regularities have an ill effect ;) and the Transition from thence, and from one thing to another, to the Extremities of the Picture all round is very Easy, and Delightful ; in which he has employ’d fine Artifices by Leaves, Twigs, little Touches of Lights striking advantageously, and the like. So that there is not a Stroke in the Picture without its Meaning ; and the whole, tho’ very Bright, and consisting of a great many Parts, has a wonderful Harmony, and Repose.

Quotation

I have many times observ’d with a great deal of Pleasure the admirable Composition (besides other Excellencies) of a Fruit-piece of Michelangelo Compadoglio, which I have had many Years. The principal Light is near the Centre (not Exactly there, for those Regularities have an ill effect ;) and the Transition from thence, and from one thing to another, to the Extremities of the Picture all round is very Easy, and Delightful ; in which he has employ’d fine Artifices by Leaves, Twigs, little Touches of Lights striking advantageously, and the like. So that there is not a Stroke in the Picture without its Meaning ; and the whole, tho’ very Bright, and consisting of a great many Parts, has a wonderful Harmony, and Repose.

Quotation

I have many times observ’d with a great deal of Pleasure the admirable Composition (besides other Excellencies) of a Fruit-piece of Michelangelo Compadoglio, which I have had many Years. The principal Light is near the Centre (not Exactly there, for those Regularities have an ill effect ;) and the Transition from thence, and from one thing to another, to the Extremities of the Picture all round is very Easy, and Delightful ; in which he has employ’d fine Artifices by Leaves, Twigs, little Touches of Lights striking advantageously, and the like. So that there is not a Stroke in the Picture without its Meaning ; and the whole, tho’ very Bright, and consisting of a great many Parts, has a wonderful Harmony, and Repose.

Quotation

There is some Degree of Merit in a Picture where Nature is Exactly copy’d, though in a Low Subject ; Such as Drolls, Countrey Wakes, Flowers, Landscapes, &c. and More in proportion as the Subject rises, or the End of the Picture is this Exact Representation. Herein the Dutch, and Flemish Masters have been Equal to the Italians, if not Superior to them in general. What gives the Italians, and Their Masters the Ancients the Preference, is, that they have not Servilely follow’d Common Nature, but Rais’d, and Improv’d, or at least have always made the Best Choice of it. This gives a Dignity to a Low Subject, and is the reason of the Esteem we have for the Landscapes of Salvator Rosa, Filippo Laura, Claude Lorrain, the Poussins ; the Fruit of the two Michelangelo’s, the Battaglia, and Campadoglio ; and This, when the Subject it self is Noble, is the Perfection of Painting : As in the best Portraits of Van-Dyck, Rubens, Titian, Rafaëlle, &c. and the Histories of the best Italian Masters ; chiefly those of Rafaëlle ; he is the great Model of Perfection !

Quotation

I have many times observ’d with a great deal of Pleasure the admirable Composition (besides other Excellencies) of a Fruit-piece of Michelangelo Compadoglio, which I have had many Years. The principal Light is near the Centre (not Exactly there, for those Regularities have an ill effect ;) and the Transition from thence, and from one thing to another, to the Extremities of the Picture all round is very Easy, and Delightful ; in which he has employ’d fine Artifices by Leaves, Twigs, little Touches of Lights striking advantageously, and the like. So that there is not a Stroke in the Picture without its Meaning ; and the whole, tho’ very Bright, and consisting of a great many Parts, has a wonderful Harmony, and Repose.

Quotation

There is some Degree of Merit in a Picture where Nature is Exactly copy’d, though in a Low Subject ; Such as Drolls, Countrey Wakes, Flowers, Landscapes, &c. and More in proportion as the Subject rises, or the End of the Picture is this Exact Representation. Herein the Dutch, and Flemish Masters have been Equal to the Italians, if not Superior to them in general. What gives the Italians, and Their Masters the Ancients the Preference, is, that they have not Servilely follow’d Common Nature, but Rais’d, and Improv’d, or at least have always made the Best Choice of it. This gives a Dignity to a Low Subject, and is the reason of the Esteem we have for the Landscapes of Salvator Rosa, Filippo Laura, Claude Lorrain, the Poussins ; the Fruit of the two Michelangelo’s, the Battaglia, and Campadoglio ; and This, when the Subject it self is Noble, is the Perfection of Painting : As in the best Portraits of Van-Dyck, Rubens, Titian, Rafaëlle, &c. and the Histories of the best Italian Masters ; chiefly those of Rafaëlle ; he is the great Model of Perfection !

Quotation

I have many times observ’d with a great deal of Pleasure the admirable Composition (besides other Excellencies) of a Fruit-piece of Michelangelo Compadoglio, which I have had many Years. The principal Light is near the Centre (not Exactly there, for those Regularities have an ill effect ;) and the Transition from thence, and from one thing to another, to the Extremities of the Picture all round is very Easy, and Delightful ; in which he has employ’d fine Artifices by Leaves, Twigs, little Touches of Lights striking advantageously, and the like. So that there is not a Stroke in the Picture without its Meaning ; and the whole, tho’ very Bright, and consisting of a great many Parts, has a wonderful Harmony, and Repose.

Quotation

There is some Degree of Merit in a Picture where Nature is Exactly copy’d, though in a Low Subject ; Such as Drolls, Countrey Wakes, Flowers, Landscapes, &c. and More in proportion as the Subject rises, or the End of the Picture is this Exact Representation. Herein the Dutch, and Flemish Masters have been Equal to the Italians, if not Superior to them in general. What gives the Italians, and Their Masters the Ancients the Preference, is, that they have not Servilely follow’d Common Nature, but Rais’d, and Improv’d, or at least have always made the Best Choice of it. This gives a Dignity to a Low Subject, and is the reason of the Esteem we have for the Landscapes of Salvator Rosa, Filippo Laura, Claude Lorrain, the Poussins ; the Fruit of the two Michelangelo’s, the Battaglia, and Campadoglio ; and This, when the Subject it self is Noble, is the Perfection of Painting : As in the best Portraits of Van-Dyck, Rubens, Titian, Rafaëlle, &c. and the Histories of the best Italian Masters ; chiefly those of Rafaëlle ; he is the great Model of Perfection !