KNOWLEDGE

KNOWLEDGE (n.)

CONNAISSANCE (fra.) · ERKENNTNIS (deu.) · KENNBARKEIT (deu.) · KENNERSCHAFT (deu.) · KENNIS (nld.) · KUNSTKENNIS (nld.) · WETENSCHAP (nld.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
CONNAISSANCE (fra.) · CONNAÎTRE (fra.) · JUGEMENT (fra.) · KENNELIJKHEID (nld.) · KENNIS (nld.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
CONNAISSANCE (fra.)
GIBSON-WOOD, Carol, Jonathan Richardson: Art Theorist of the English Enlightenment, New Haven - London, Yale University Press, 2000.
GIBSON-WOOD, Carol, « Jonathan Richardson and the Rationalization of Connoisseurship », Art History, 7/1, 1984, p. 38-56 [En ligne : http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8365.1984.tb00127.x/abstract consulté le 23/06/2015].

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6 quotations

Quotation

Of the Necessity and Definition of Proportion.


It was not without just Cause, that the antient
Græcians (at which time the Art of Painting had fully attained to his Perfection, by the Industry of Timantes, Eusenidas, Aristides, Eupompus, Sicyonias and Pamphilus, the famous Macedonian Painter, and Master of Apelles, who also was the first learned Painter directing his Workes by the Rules of Art, above any of his Predecessors, and well considering that whatsoever was made without measure and proportion, could never carry with it any such congruity as might represent either Beauty or Grace to the judicious beholder) were wont to say, that it was impossible to make any tolerable, much less any Commendable Picture, without the help of Geometry and Arithmetick, wherefore they required the Knowledge thereof, as a thing most necessary, which saying was also approved by Philip Macedo. And surely it is impossible (to omitt the meere Artizans) that he who is ignorant of these two Sciences, should understand the exact measure and proprotion of any probable or true Body, the necessity of which proportions shall be shewed hereafter.

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L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Now the perfect knowledge of this motion, is (as hath been shewed) accounted the most difficult part of the art, and reputed as a divine gift. Insomuch, as herein alone consisteth the comparison between Painting and Poetry, for as it is required in a Poet, that besides the excellency of his wit, he should moreover be furnished with a certain propension and inclination of will, inciting and moving him to versity, (which the antient called the fury of Apollo and the Muses) so likewise a Painter ought, together with those natural parts which are required at his hands, to be furnished with a natural dexterity and inborn flight of expressing the principal motions, even from his cradle ; otherwise it is a very hard (if not impossible) matter, to obtain to the absolute perfection of this Art.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Traveller,
            There remained in Græce some little footsteps of the Art [ndr : au Moyen Âge] ; and from thence it was, that about the Year 1250, there came some Painters, who could hardly be called Masters, having scarce any more knowledge of the Art than just to draw the Out-lines without either Grace or Proportion ; the first Schollar they made in Italy, was at Florence, and was called Cimabue ; who being helped by Nature, soon outdid his Masters, and began to give some strength to his Drawings, but still without any great Skill, as not understanding how to manage his Lights and Shadows, or indeed, how to Design truely ; it being it those days an unusual and unattempted thing to Draw after the
Life.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
L’ARTISTE → règles et préceptes

Quotation

There is but one Way to come to the Knowledge of Hands ; And that is To furnish our Minds with as Just, and Compleat Ideas of the Masters (not as Men at large ; but meerly as Painters) as we can : And in proportion as we do Thus we shall be good Connoisseur in This particular.

Expression Knowledge of Hands

term translated by CONNAISSANCE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 64.

Conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → connaissance

Quotation

Another Pleasure belonging to Connoissance is when we find any thing Particular, and Curious : As the First Thoughts of a Master for some Remarkable Picture. […].
The Pleasure that arises from the Knowledge of Hands is not Like, or Equal to that of the other Parts of the Business of a
Connoisseur ; But neither is That destitute of it. When one sees an Admirable piece of Art ‘tis part of the Entertainment to know to whom to attribute it, and then to know his History, Whence else is the custom of putting the Author’s Picture, or Life at the beginning of a Book ?

connoissance

term translated by CONNAISSANCE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 211-212.

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SPECTATEUR → connaissance

Quotation

{Athenion.} ATHENION of Marona, Disciple of Glaucion, was a Man of very good Skill, and tho’ his Way of Colouring seem’d somewhat dry, and not altogether so agreeable (he not affecting the Gaudery of Colours) yet his Works were throughly Painted, and he maintain’d the full Vigour and Strength of his Lights and Shadows, which, with his unwearied Endeavours, and Re-search after every Thing that was Excellent and Worthy of his Knowledge in the ART, render’d him equal in Esteem with Pausius and Nicias, and had he not unhappily died in his Youth, in the Opinion they had of him, he had become a most excellent and extraordinary Man.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités