REFLECTION (n.)

REFLECTIE (nld.) · REFLET (fra.) · REFLEXION (deu.) · RÉFLEXION (fra.) · RIFLESSIONE (ita.) · RIFLESSO (ita.) · SPEKULATION (deu.) · SPIEGELING (nld.) · WEERGLANS (nld.) · WEERKAATSING (nld.) · WEERSCHIJN (nld.) · WEERSTEUTING (nld.) · WERKÜRSSUNG (deu.) · WIDERSCHEIN (deu.) · WIDERSCHLAG (deu.) · ZURÜCKWERFFUNG (deu.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
REFLECTIE (nld.) · RÉFLEXION (fra.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
RÉFLEXION (fra.)
BAXANDALL, Michael, Shadows and Enlightenment, London - New Haven, Yale University Press, 1995.
EIKEMA HOMMES, Margriet van et WETERING, Ernst van, « Light and Colour in Caravaggio and Rembrandt, as Seen through the Eyes of their Contemporaries », dans BULL, Duncan, DIBBITS, Taco et EIKEMA HOMMES, Margriet van (éd.), Rembrandt-Caravaggio, cat. exp., Amsterdam, The Van Gogh Museum, 2006, Paris, Hazan, 2006, p. 164-179.
HOCHMANN, Michel, « Les reflets colorés  : optique et analyse du coloris du XVIe au XVIIe siècle », dans HOCHMANN, Michel et JACQUART, Danielle (éd.), Lumière et vision dans les sciences et les arts de l’Antiquité au XVIIe siècle, Actes du colloque de Paris, Genève, Droz, 2010, p. 325-339.
KERN, Ulrike, Light and Shade in Dutch and Flemish Art. A History of Chiaroscuro in Art Theory and Artistic Practice in the Netherlands of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, Turnhout, Brepols, 2013.
KERN, Ulrike, « REFLET », dans HECK, Michèle-Caroline (éd.), LexArt. Les mots de la peinture (France, Allemagne, Angleterre, Pays-Bas, 1600-1750) [édition anglaise, 2018], Montpellier, Presses Universitaires de la Méditerranée, 2018, p. 417-420.
MÉROT, Alain, Les conférences de l'Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture au XVIIe siècle, Paris, École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, 1996.

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

3 sources
4 quotations

Quotation

Observations for Placing the Lights, and for Shadowing of Garments, and other things in general.


Observation I.


Let all the Lights be placed one way in those Piece of Work, whether in the Figure, Faces, or Garments. If the Lights fall sideways on the Picture, you make the other side (which is furthest from the Light) darkest. And let the Lights be placed all together on the one side, and not confusedly on both sides alike, […].

The Reason why the Shadows must generally fall one way.


First, because the Light doth not with all its brightness illuminate any more then that part that is directly opposite unto it.
The second Reason is taken from the nature of the Eye ; for the first part of the Body coming to the Eye with a bigger angle, is seen more distinctly ; but the second part being further off, is seen by the Eye in a lesser angle. […]. 


Observation II.


That part of the Body must be made lightest, which hath the Light most directly opposite to it ; as the Light be placed above the Head, descending then, the top of the Head must be made Lightest, the Shoulder next Lightest, and so you must lose by degrees. […]. As for Sattens and Silks, and all other Shining Stuffs, have certain Bright Reflections, exceeding Bright, with sudden Light Glances, especially where the Light falls brightest ; and so the Reflections are less bright, by how much the Garment falls more inward from the Light. The like is seen in Armour, and Brass Pots and Kettles, or any Glittering Metalls : you may see a sudden Brightness in the middle or centre of the Light, which causes the Shining nature of such things.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

In Carnations, we must avoid the Affectation of too many Clear Red Colours, which more resemble the Skin when Flead of, then the true Natural Skin.
            Nor must we affect the diversity of
Sparkling and Glowing Colours, as the Bright of Diaphanous Bodys, which represent reflections of the variety of Neighbouring Colours ; always remembring, that mans Skin how Beautiful soever, dwells in a delicate down-Colour.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

Quotation

Colours must be so laid together, that they may be all sweetly united under the Briskness of a principall one, that it may participate of the Light which is chief over all the rest in the Picture ; and that all the Colours be Connected together by an agreeable Union, and likewise so dispos’d as they may partake of each other, by the Communication of the Light and help of Reflection.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

DESIGN or DRAWING
By these Terms is sometimes understood the expressing our Thoughts upon Paper, or whatever other flat Superficies ; and that by Resemblances form’d by a Pen, Crayon, Chalk, or the like. But more commonly, The giving the Just Form, and Dimension of Visible Objects, according as they appear to the Eye ; if they are pretended to be describ’d in their Natural Dimensions ; If Not, but Bigger, or Lesser, then Drawing, or Designing signifies only the giving those Things their true Form, which implies an exact proportionable Magnifying, or Diminishing in every part alike
And this comprehends also giving the true Shapes, Places, and even Degrees of Lights, Shadows, and Reflections ; because if these are not right, if the thing has not its due Force, or Relief, the true Form of what is pretended to be drawn cannot be given : These shew the Out-Line all round, and in every part, as well as where the Object is terminated on its Back-Ground.

term translated by RÉFLEXION in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 114-115.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → lumière