COLOUR (CHROMATIC)

COLOUR (CHROMATIC) (n.)

COLORE (ita.) · COULEUR (CHAMP CHROMATIQUE) (fra.) · FARBE (chromatik) (deu.) · KLEUR (CHROMATISCH) (nld.) · VERF (nld.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
COULEUR (CHAMP CHROMATIQUE) (fra.) · KLEUR (CHROMATISCH) (nld.) · VERF (nld.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
COULEUR (CHAMP CHROMATIQUE) (fra.)
GIBSON-WOOD, Carol, Jonathan Richardson: Art Theorist of the English Enlightenment, New Haven - London, Yale University Press, 2000.

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

7 sources
21 quotations

Quotation

A Purple colour.
Take two pound of Heidleber, two ounces of Allum, halfe an ounce of ashes of Copper, halfe a pound of water ; put them into a Skillet, and let them boyle till a third be consumed : when it is cold, straine it into a cleane vessell, and let it stand a while, then straine it into another, and then let it stand till it be thicke enough.


[…]

Browne Colour.
Take good browne, and grinde it with Gumme water : his false colour is made with two parts browne, and a third part white lead, sad it with the same browne.

[…]

A Blew.
Boyle Mulberries with Allum.


An Emerauld Colour.
Take Verdigreese, and grinde it first dry, and put unto it a little of the Gall of the neat : also of Saffron, and the juyce of Rew, of each a little : grinde them together, and put them into a shell, and let it dry there : when you would use it, grinde it againe with Vineger or Verjuce, and a little neats gall dissolved in either of them. His false colour is two parts greene, and a third ceruse : it must bee sadded with a good greene.

A Motlie greene.
This colour is compounded of red and greene.


A Blacke Colour.
First you must lay on a light blacke, mingled with white lead, and afterwards when it is dry, sad it with good blacke ; for sad blacke, mixe Indie Baudias with Gumme water.

A marble or ashe colour.
This is compounded of blacke and white.


A russet or sad Browne.
This colour is made by compounding a little white, with a good quantity of red.

A browne Blew.
Take two parts of Indie Baudias, and a third of ceruse and temper them with gumme water.


A Brasse Colour.
This is compounded of Masticot and Umber.

A gold yellow for Armes.
Take Orpment, and Masticot, grinde each by themselves : but in grinding of the Masticot, adde a little Saffron, and worke with them. Note you may alay your Orpment with chalke, and sadde it with browne of Spain or Oker de Luke.


Azure
Take of white lead foure ounces, of Indicum two ounces, put them into a leaden pot with vinegar : boyle them well, and that which swimmes on the top is the colour.

A purple or violet Colour.
This is a compounded colour, and it is made either by mixing a quantitie of Azure, and a portion of Turnsole : or else by mixing a quantitie of cusset, and a quantitie of Azure :

Sanguine or Blood-colour.
This is likewise a compounded colour, and it is made by mixing a good quantitie of Cinaper with a little blacke.

Orange-tawny.
This colour is compounded of a brigh red, and a bright yellow.

A Lyon-tawny.
This colour is made by mixing red lead and Masticot together.

A Carnation, or Flesh-colour.
First you must lay on a white colour tempered with gumme-water, and when it is drie you must go it over againe with Vermilion or lake, or else you must temper ceruse and vermilleon together, and being dry, go over it againe with lake or vermillion.


[…]

A Blood red.
This colour is made of Cinaper, and afterwards sadded with Vermilleon at the sides, or else with a browne colour. A bloudy colour, grinde Cinaper, Lake, and Cinaper tops, put them into good water, and if they be too light, put to them a little Turnsole.

A Lincoln-greene.
This colour is compounded of a good greene and Saffron.

A Poppin-jay greene.
This colour is compounded of azure, and masticot.

A good yellow.
Take Saffron, or Cambugium, and temper it with gum water, Sad it with Vermilleon.


A sable or blacke.
Take a Torch, hold it under a lattyn Bason, temper that blacke with gumme-water.

A velvet-blacke.
Burne harts-horne on a Colliers hearth ; then grinde it with the gaul of a neat, put it into a shell, and let it dry in the shade : when you would use it, grinde it againe with gumme-water.

[…].

To make Azure, or bise sadder.
Take blew Turnsole, wet it in gum-water, and the wring it out and mixe it either with Bise, or else over-shadow the Bise with it.

Red Colour.
Take Vermilion, and temper it with gumme water : His false colour is two parts vermillion, and a third part ceruse.

Another Red.
Take russet, and temper it with gumme-water, clay it with ceruse, and sad it with it selfe.

Another Red.
Take Brassill in grosse powder, allum in powder : steep them in gum water a night and a day : then straine it, and keepe it for use.


A greene Colour.
Take Copper plates, put them in a copper pot, & put distilled vineger to them : set them in a warme place till the vinegar become blew, then put it out into another leaded pot, and poure more vinegar into it again ; let it stand so till it become blew ; this do so many times till you thinke you have enough : then let it stand till it be thicke.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

I cannot prescribe, how to order your light, in a piece of Landskip by the Life ; for according to the place, as you look North, or Southward, East, or West-ward, as the time of the day and the Sun’s declination, so must you order your shadows as they appear. But in all working of Painting by Fancie, let your light descend from your left, to your right hand : So will it appear upon the work, from the right to the left, the more gracefull. […].
{To make a Landskip.} In making it ; First, beginne with a large
skie or Element and if there be any shining or reflection of the Sunne, (in which only the Dutch are neat and curious,) then you must be carefull, by no meanes to mixe Red-lead, or Mene, in the purple of the skie, or Clouds, but only with Lake and White ; […] For you must not mingle the blew Colours of the Clouds with any Pensil that hath touched Masticoate ; It will make the skie Greenish and discoloured.
[…].

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
GENRES PICTURAUX → paysage

Quotation

Having all your colours ready ground, with your pallet on the thumb of your left hand, and pencils for every colour, in the same lay your colours upon your pallet thus : first, your white Lead, then Lake, Ivory black, Seacoale black (as you see the complexion) Lamp-black, Umber for the haire, red Lead, yellow Oaker, Verdigreece ; then your Blews, Masticot and Pink ; the rest at your pleasure, mixing them on the other side of the pallet, at your pleasure

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → outils
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Of Wood colours, Barks of Trees, &c.
Your Wood-colours are compounded either of Umber and white, Char-coal and white, Sea-coal and white, Umber black and white, or with some green added. Sometime adde a little Lake or Vermilion.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

The Colours to be used in Limning are termed thus,


Whites (Flake white / Serus)
Red (Carmine, / Indian Lake, / Red Lead, / Indian Red, / Burnt Ocur, &c.)
Yellow (Masticot, / Yellow ocur, / Eng. ocur, / Pinck.)
Greens (Sap Green, / Pinck and Bice, / Green Bice, / Terra Vert.)
Blews (Ultra Marine, / Dutch Bice, / Smalt, / Indigo.)
Browns (Gall Stone, / Mumme, / Cullins Earth, / Umber, / Rust.)
Blacks (Ivory black, / Sea-cole, / Lamp black, / Cherry Stone.)

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

The NAMES of the COLOURS Most useful and onely necessary for MINITURE.


(
Flake White)
Reds (Carmine / Indian Lake / Cynnabar LakeFlorence Lake / Cynnabar / Red Lead / Yellow Oker burnt)
Blews (Ultra Marine / Dutch Bice / Smalt / Indigo)
Yellows (Light Masticote / Deep Masticote /Yellow Oker / Roman Oker / Gall-stone / Light Pink / Dark Pink)
Greens (Green Pink / Green Bice / TerraVerte)
Browns (Collens Earth / Burnt Umber / Umber / Rust of Iron)
Blacks (Burnt Ivory / Sea Cole / Cherry-stone burnt / Verditer burnt)

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Of the Nature and Property of the Colours not useful, and the Reasons why omitted.


Of which I shall begin with
Ceruse. As for Ceruse, it is too Yellow, Course, and Gritty. Spanish Brown is omitted as not being so Brisk and Glowing as Indian Red. Red Chalk is too Foul and Dirty, and also English Oker burnt. Artifical Vermilion may be omitted, because that Native Cynnabar is better, of a Brisker Colour, and better Condition’d. As for Orpiment, it is both Venomous and Course. Verdigrease is extreamly Course, and will fade if you prepare it never so well. And all Colours made of Juyces in Germany will certainly fade, because they are of no Body, and will shine much. English Oker is good Condition’d, and may be made use of ; but Roman Oker is more Glowing : therefore you may omit the former and use the later. Sap Green may be omitted, because it both shineth and fadeth : and Green Pink is used instead of it, because it hath neither of these Faults. Mummy is every way ill-condition’d, and hard, and will not flow out of your Pencil, unless you burn it in a Crucible well Luted ; so prepared, it may make a good Black. But as for Blacks, those Four which I principally mentioned before [ndr : Burnt Ivory, Sea Cole, Cherry-stone burnt, Verditer burnt], are sufficient enought to do any thing withall, though there are many other Blacks used, as Grape-stones burnt, Vine-stalks burnt, Lamp Black, Blew Black, and many other I could name, which in my Opinion are rather a Confusion then an Help ;

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Some further Directions how to temper and mingle your Colours by way of Composition or Temperature, to make all these following Colours, and also the manner how to Deepen or Shadow them.


For Carnatian temper Lake and White, and deepen it or shadow it with Lake.
For a Violet temper fine
Dutch Bice and Lake, and deepen it with Indigo.
[…].

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

SECT III. Of Colours.
There are simply six,
viz. White, Black, Red, Green, Yellow, and Blew ; to which we may add Browns, but they are compounded. […].

Chap. II,
Of Colours used in Limning : their names, and how to order them.
SECT. I.
Of the Names of Colours, and how every Colour is to be prepared ; whether Ground, Wash’d, or Steep’d.

BLACKS. /
Cherry-stones burnt. / Ivory burnt. / Lamp black.

WHITES. /
Ceruse. / White-Lead.

REDS. /
Red-Lead. / Lake.

GREENS. /
Bise. / Pink. / Sapgreen. / Cedar-green.

BLEWS. /
Indico. / Ultramarine. / Bise. / Smalt.

YELLOWS. / English
Oker. / Masticote.

BROWNS. /
Umber. / Spanish Brown. / Colen’s Earth.

These are the principal Colours used in Limning ; I have omitted many others but they are such that are not fitting for this Work, which I shall speak of when I come to teach how to
wash Maps and printed Pictures, for which use those Colours I have omitted are only useful.
Of the Colours here mentioned, useful in Limning, they are to be used three several ways,
viz. either Washed, Grownd, or Steeped.

The Colours to be only
Washed are these :
Bise. / Smalt.
Cedar. / Ultramarine.
Red-Lead. / Masticote.

To be
Steeped, only Sap-green.

The Colours to be
Washed and Grownd, are these :
Ceruse. / White-Lead. / Lake. / English Oker.
Pink. / Indico. / Umber. / Colens Earth.
Spanish
Brown. / Ivory, / and Cherry-stone. ) black.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

SECT. II. Of those Colours that are to be Grownd, and how to Grind them.
Have in the last Section told you what Colours are to be Grownd, which Washed, and which to be Steeped ; it resteth now, to shew you how to grind those Colours that are to be grownd ; I shall not run over every Colour particularly ; but shew you how to grind one Colour, which take as an Example for all the rest.
For one example in grinding of Colours, let us take the original of Colours,
viz. Ceruse, or White-lead, there is little difference between them, only one is refined, the other not.
To grind it do thus […].

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

SECT. III. Of those Colours that are to be Washed, and how to Wash them.
As in the Grinding of Colours I gave you an instance but in one for all the rest, the like I shall do for those Colours which are to be
Washed ; I will make my instance in Red-Lead, which you are to Wash in this manner […].

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

I Said (among the Colours before mentioned) there was only Sap green to be Steeped, though in Colours to wash Maps and Prints, there are many, […]. To Steep your Sap-green do thus, take a quantity thereof and put it into a Shell, and fill the shell with fair water, to which add some fine powder of Allum to raise the colour ; let it thus steep twenty four hours, and you will have a very good Green.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Chap. I. Of the Names of your Colours, and how to Grind and order them.

The Names of the Colours in Oyl.
BLACKS /
Lamp-black. / Seacoal-black. / Ivory-black. / Charcoal-black. / Earth of Colen.
WHITES /
White-Lead.
GREENS. /
Verdigrease. / Terra vert. / Verditer.
BLEWS. /
Bise. / Indico. / Smalt. / Ultamarine.
REDS. /
Vermilion. / Red-Lead. / Lake. / India-Red. / Ornotto.
YELLOWS. /
Pink. / Masticote. / English Oker. / Orpiment. / Spruse Oker.
Spanish
Brown, Burnt Spruse, Umber.

These are the chief Colours that are used in Painting in Oyl, the most part of which are to be grownd very fine upon your Stone with a Muller, with Linseed-Oyl : some must be Burnt before they be Grownd ; others must be only temper’d upon the Pallat, and not grownd at all.
The Colours to be burnt are these :
Ivory, Spruse, Oker, and Umber.
The Colours that are not to be Grownd at all, but only tempered with Oyl upon your Pallat, are these :
Lamp-black, Verditer, Vermilion, Bise, Smalt, Masticote, Orpiment, Ultamarine.
All the rest are to be Grownd upon your Stone with Linseed-Oyl ; only White-Lead, when you are to use that for Linnen, you must grind it with Oyl of Walnuts, for Linseed-Oyl will make it turn yellow.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Chap. III, How to order your Colours upon your Pallat, and how to temper Shadows for all Complexions.
Dispose your single Colours upon your Pallat in this order, laying them at a convenient distance one from another, so that they be not apt to intermix. First lay on your Vermilion, then lake, then burnt Oker,
India Red, Pink, Umber, Blacks, and Smalt : lay the White next to your thumb, because it is oftenest used, for with it you lighten all your shadows ; next to your White lay a stiff sort of Lake : this done, your Pallat is furnished with the single Colours belonging to a Face ; then for the tempering of your Shadows to all Complexions, observe the following Directions.

1. For a Fair Complexion.
Take a little White, and twice as much Vermilion, and as much Lake temper these well together upon your Pallat with the flat blade of your knife ; lay aside by it self on your Pallat the greatest quantity of this to be used for the deepest Carnation of the Face […].
Your Carnations being thus tempered, and orderly laid upon your Pallat, prepare your faint Shadows. For which,
Take Smalt, and mix it with a little White, which may serve for the Eyes ; lay aside the greatest quantity, and to the rest add a little Pink, this well tempered and laid by it self, will serve for the faint greenish shadows in the Face.
Now prepare your deep Shadows : for which take Lake, Pink, […].

2.
For a more Brown or Swarthy Complexion.
Lay your single Colours on your Pallat as before, and in like manner temper them, only amongst your White Lake, and Vermilion, put a little quantity of burnt Oker, to make it look somewhat Tawny […].

3.
For a Tawny Complexion.
The general Colours must be the same as before, only the Shadows are different, for you are to prepare them of Umber, and burnt Oker, […].

4.
For an Absolute Black Complexion.
Your dark Shadows must be the same as before ; but for your heightnings, you must take White, burnt Oker, Lake, and Black, put but a little White in at first, […].
Here note, that the single Colours at first laid upon your Pallat being tempered together according to the former directions, serve for shadows for all Complexions.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs
GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait

Quotation

Chap. VI, Of Garments of several colours, and of their proper Colouring.
The next thing I shall speak of, shall be of
Drapery or Garments, and the true and proper manner of Colouring of them.
And
1. For a Red Garment.
For a light-red Garment, first dead-colour it with Vermilion, and when you would finish it, glaze it over with Lake, and heighten it with White.
For a Scarlet.
[…]
For a Crimson Velvet.
[…]
For a sad Red.
[…]
2.
For Green Garments.
The best Green for holding, is Bise and Pink, heighten it with Masticote, and deepen it with Indico and Pink.
For Green Velvet.
[…].
3.
For Blew Garments.
Take Indico and White, first lay the White in its due places, and then your mean colour, namely Indico and White mixed in their due places, then deepen it with Indico only, […].
4. For
Yellow Garments.
For a Yellow Garment, Masticote, yellow Oker, and Umber ; lay the dead colour of Masticote and White in the lightest places, Oker and White in the mean places, and Umber in the darkest places ; when it is dry glaze it with Pink. […].
5.
For Black Garments.
Let the dead colour be Lamp-black, and some Verdigrease ; when that is dry, go over it with Ivory-black and Verdigrease ; before you go over it the second time, heighten it with White.
6.
For Purple Garments.
Oyl Smalt, tempered with Lake and White-Lead, heighten it with White Lead.
7.
Orange Colour.
Red-Lead and Lake, lay the lightest parts of all with Red-Lead and White, the mean parts with Red-Lead alone, the deeper parts with Lake, if need require heighten it with White.
8.
Hair Colour.
Umber and White for the ground, Umber and Black for the deeper shadows, Umber and
English Oker for mean shadows, for heightning White with a little English Oker.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

In Landskip, variety of Colours are required ; I will therefore begin with those first.

Colours for the Skie.
For the Aiery skie that seems a great way off, take Oyl-Smalt or Bise, […] ; for a Red sky use Lake and White, […].

Colours for Trees.
For some use Lake, Umber, and White ; for others Charcoal and White, […].

Of several Greens in Landskip.
For a light Green use Pink and Masticote heightned with White.
For a sad Green, Indico and Pink heightned with Masticote.
You may make Greens of any degree whatsoever.
In Painting of Landskip I shall say nothing here, that which I have already said in the Sixth Chapter of the Book of
Limning being sufficient.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

SECT. I. Of Colours for washing.
Here note, that all the Colours that are mentioned in the Second Chapter of the Third Book concerning
Limning in Water-Colours, are all to be used in Washing or Colouring of Pictures ; wherefore provide your self of those Colours, grind them, wash them, and steep and temper them according as you are directed in that Second Chapter ; I say, you must have all these Colours in a readiness ; and for Colouring of Prints some other Colours, namely these that follow, which how to order I will anon shew you.

Colours to be used in Washing, which are not used in Limning.
BLACKS. /
Printers Black, / or / Franckford-black, / to be had of the / Plate-Printers.
REDS /
Vermilion. / Rosset.
BLEWS. /
Verditure. / Litmos. / Flory.
YELLOWS.
Gumbooge, Yellow-berries, Orpiment.

Also these ;
Brazeel and Log-wood ground, and Turnsoil.
Of these Colours above-mentioned,
Printers Black, Vermilion. Rosset, Verditure, and Orpiment are to be Ground as is taught in the second Section of the second Chapter of the third Book, page 70. and therefore, I say, Grind them as you are there taught.
Now for the other Colours above-mentioned, they are to be ordered several ways, as followeth.
And
1. Of
Litmos, how to order it.
Take fine
Litmos and cut it in small pieces, then lay it in steep the space of twenty four hours […] it will be a pure Blew Water, good to Wash withall.

2.
Of Flory Blew.
Take
Flory Blew and grind it with the white of an Egg, […].
Flory thus ground, if you add thereto a little Rosset, it maketh a light Violet-colour.
If you mix with it both Red and white Lead, it maketh a Crane Feather-colour.
It, and Pink, Masticote, or Gum-booge make a fair Green.


3.
Of Gumbooge.
Take Gumbooge and dissolve it in fair spring-water, and it maketh a most beautiful and transparent Yellow.

4.
Of Yellow-Berries.
Take
Yellow-Berries, bruise them a little, and let them steep in Allum-water all night, in the morning you will have a very fair Yellow to Wash withall.

5.
Of Turnsoil.
Turnsoil is made of pieces of Linnen cloth dyed of a kind of Violet-colour.
[…] it is an excellent good liquor to shadow upon any Carnation or Yellow.

6.
Of Brazeel.
Take
Brazeel grownd, to which put a quantity of small Beer, […] it maketh a very transparent Red.

7.
Of Logwood.
If you boyl
Log-wood grownd in all respects as you did your Brazeel, it will make a very fair transparent Purple-colour.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Chap. II. Of other Colours for Washing, both Simple and Compounded.
1. How to make a Green colour of Copper-plates.
Take any shreds of Copper, and put distilled Vinegar to them, […], and it will be a good Green.
2.
To make a Green another way.
The best is
Cedar-green, but that is dear ; therefore you may take green Bise and steep it in Vinegar, […].
3.
Another Green.
Take the juyce of Rew, and a little Verdigrease, and a little Saffron, and grind them well together, and use it with a little Gum-water.
4.
For light Greens.
Sap-greens, Flower de Bise, or Tawny-green, these need no grinding, only steep’d in fair water, Verditer and Ceruss mixt with a little Copper-green, makes a good light colour.
5.
To shadow Greens.
Indico and Yellow-berries will do very well.
6.
Greens for Landskips and Rocks.
Temper your Green with white Pink, Bise, Masticote, Smalt, or Indico, or Ceruss.
Blew Verditer mixt with a few Vellow-Berries, make another Green.

7. To make a Blew.
There is
Venice-Ultamarine, but this is very dear ; there are Bises of several sorts, deeper or paler ; there is Smalt and Verditer ; grind any of these with Gum-water.
8.
Of shadowing Blews.
There is Indico, Litmos, or Flory, take any of these, they need no grinding, steep them in the lees of Sope ashes ; […].

9. To make a Brown.
Take Ceruss, Red-Lead,
English-Oker, and Pink.
10. Spanish Brown.
It’s a dirty colour, yet of great use if you burn it till it be red hot ; but if you would colour any hare, horse, or dog, or the like, you must not burn it, but to shadow Vermilion, or to lay upon any dark ground behind a Picture, or to shadow Berries in the darkest places, or to colour any wooden Poste, Wainscot, bodies of Trees, or any thing else of Wood, or any dark ground on a Picture.

11. How to make an Orange-colour.
Red-Lead is the nearest to an Orange, put a few Yellow-berries into it, makes a good Orange.

12. A Flesh-colour.
Take of White and a little Lake, and some Red-Lead mixed, you may make it light or red as you please, by adding more or less White in shadowing the Cheeks and other places, if you would have a swarthy complexion : and to distinguish the Mans flesh from the Womans, mingle a little yellow Oker among your Flesh.

13.
Colours for the Skie.
Light Masticote, or Yellow-berries, and White for the lowest and lightest places ; red Posset, White for the next degree ; blew Bise and White for the other ; and blew Bise for the highest, for want of Bise use Verditer ; these must be worked together ; you must not receive any sharpness in the edg of your Colour, and they must be so laid on, that you cannot perceive where you first began to lay them, you must so drown them one in another.
14.
To make colours for Precious stones.
[…].
15. Colours for Landskips.
For the saddest Hills use burnt Umber, for the lightest places put some Yellow to the burnt Umber ; and for the other Hills lay Copper-green thickned on the fire, or in the Sun ; for the next Hills further off, mix some Yellow-berries with Copper green, and let the fourth part be done with green Verditer ; and the furthest, faintest places with the blew Bise, and for want of that, with blew Verditer mingled with White for the lightest places, and shadowed with blew Verditer in the shadows indifferent thick ; the Highways do with Red-Lead and White, […] ; the Rocks you may do with several colours, […] the Water must be black Verditer and White, […]

16.
Colours for Building.
When you colour Buildings, do it with as much variety of pleasant colours as possible can be imagined, yet not without reason, and let discretion rule you in mixing your Colours ; […].
17. How to Shadow every colour in Garments, or Drapery.
Take this Rule, that every Colour is made to shadow it self, or if you mingle it with White for the light, and so shadow it with the same colour unmingled with White, else take off the thinnest of the colour for the light, and so shadow it with the thickest bottom of the colour ; if you will have your shadow of a darker colour, then the colour it self is to shadow the deepest places. 

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

SECT. II. Directions for the Mixing of your Colours.
To mix any Colour, be careful that you make it not too sad ; when you mix your Colours be careful you put not your Pencils out of one Colour into another, for it will spoil and dirty your other Colours, except you wash your Pencils clean.
When you mix any Colours, stir them well about ; the water being well coloured, pour it out into a Shell, and stir the rest of the Colours and mingle them together ; pour out the Colour first, that you may the better know what quantity of the sadder will serve.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

And sometimes the Painter happens to be Obliged to put a Figure in a Place, and with a Degree of Force which does not sufficiently distinguish it. In that Case, the Attention must be awakened by the Colour of its Drapery, or a Part of it, or by the Ground on which ‘tis painted, or some other Artifice.
Scarlet, or some Vivid Colour, is very proper on such Occasions : I think I have met with an Instance of This kind from
Titian, in a Bacchus and Ariadne ; Her Figure is Thus distinguish’d for the reason I have given.

term translated by COULEUR (CHAMP CHROMATIQUE) in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 105-106.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → composition

Quotation

BEFORE we leave this eminent Master [ndr : Apelle], we cannot but take notice what Pliny in two several Places, has, with pretty positive Assurance asserted, that in all the stupendious Paintings of this ARTIST above-cited, he made use of but four Colours only, which were White, Yellow, Red, and Black ; his White Tripoli of Melos ; for Yellows, Okre of Athens ; for Reds, red Okre and Synopye of Pontos, and for Black, ordinary Vitrial, or Shoemakers Black. […] in another Place himself [ndr : Pline] tells us (besides the other Black above-mention’d) Apelles was the first that invented to make Black of Ivory, or the Tooth of an Elephant burnt, which was call’d Elephantinum, and gives us the Particulars of several other Colours, both Natural and Artificial, found out and used among the Greek, […]. 

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs