CLOTH

CLOTH (n.)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGUREvêtements et plis
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVREcouleurs · outils · technique de la peinture
DOEK (nld.) · LEINWAND (deu.) · TOILE (fra.) · TUCH (deu.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
DOEK (nld.)

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

4 sources
4 quotations

Quotation

For Russes, Lawnes, Linnen.
For Linnen, take white Lead mingle with Charcoal black, so making it whiter or darker at your pleasure ; for your fine Lawnes, put a little oyl smalt in amongst it, and with a fine little bag of Taffata stuffed with wooll or the like, take up the colour and presse it hard down where you would have it. 

For Velvets of all colours.
For
black-velvet, take Lamp-black and Verdigreace for your first ground ; but when it is dry, lay it over with Ivory black and Verdigreace, (to help it to dry) and for the shadow, use white Lead, with a little Lamp-black.
For
Green Velvet, take Lamp-black, and white Lead, and work it over like Russet Velvet ; then being dry, draw it only with Verdigreace, and a little Pinke, and it will be a perfect Green Velvet.
For a
Sea-water Green Velvet, lay on the foresaid mingled Russet Verdigreace only ; if you will have it more grassie, put to more Pinke.
For a Yellowish Green, put a little Masticot among your Verdigreace at your pleasure : but note this, all your shadowing must be in the Russet, and these Greens only drawn lightly over. 
For
Red Velvet, take Vermilion, and shadow it with Brown of Spain, and where you will have it darkest, take Sea-coale black mingled with Spanish Brown, and shadow where you will, letting it dry ; then glaze it over with Lake, and it will be a perfect red Velvet. 
For a
Crimson, or Carnation Velvet, put the more or less white Lead to the Vermilion, as you shal see cause.
For a
Blew Velvet, take Masticot and yellow Oker, and deepen it for the shadow with Umber.
For
Tauny Velvet, take Brown of Spain, white Lead, and Lamp-black, mixed with a little Verdigreace to shadow it, where you see occasion ; and when it is dry, glaze it over with a little Lake, and red Velvet added unto it.
For
Purple Velvet, take Oyl Smalt, and temper it with Lake, half Lake, half Smalt ; then take white Lead and order it as bright or as sad as you list.
For
Ash-coloured Velvet ; take Char-coale black, and white Lead, and make a perfect Russet of the same, deepning it with the black, or heightning it with your white at your pleasure.
For
Hair-coloured Velvet, grinde Umber by it self with Oyl, and lay it on your Picture, and heighten with white Lead and the same Umber.


For Sattens in Oyl Colours.
For Black Satten, grinde Lamp-black with Oyl, then mixe it with some white Lead ; where you will have it shine most, mingle some Lake with your white Lead.
For
White Satten, take white Lead ground with Oyl, then grinde Ivory black by it self, and where you will have it sad, adde more of the black.
For
Green Satten, take Verdigreace and grinde it by it self, then mixe some white Lead with it ; and where you will have it bright, adde some Pinke : if more inclining to a Popingjay, adde more Pinke to your white Lead : and to deepen it more, adde more Verdigreace. 
For
Yellow Satten, grinde Masticot by it self, yellow Oker by it self, and Umber by it self ; where you will have it lightest, let the Masticot serve ; where a light shadow, let the Oker serve ; where the darkest or saddest, Umber only.
For
Blew Satten, take Oyl Smalt, and white Lead, ground by themselves ; white Lead for the heightning, and Smalt for your deepning, or darkest shadow.
For
Purple Satten, mixe Oyl, Smalt, with Lake, and white Lead : heightning with white Lead.
For
Orenge Tauny Satten, take red Lead and Lake ; where you will have it brightest, take red Lead by it self, and where made sad, Lake.
For
Red Satten, grinde Brown of Spain by it self, mingling Vermilion with the same ; where you would have it light, put it a little white Lead.
For
Hair-coloured Satten, take Umber and white Lead ; heighten with your white Lead, and for the darke shadow of the cuts, adde to your Umber a little Sea-coale black.


For Taffata’s.
Make your Taffata’s all one as you do your Sattens, but you must observe the shadowing of Taffata’s ; for they fall more fine with the folds, and are thicker by much.
For changeable Taffata’s, take sundry colours, what you please, and lay them upon your garment or picture one by another ; first casting out the folds, then with your Pencil driving and working them finely one into another.


For Cloth.
Cloth likewise is as your Sattens, but that you must not five so shining and sudden a glosse unto it.


For Leather.
As Busse, take yellow Oker
, and some white Lead mixed with it : and where you will have it darker, by degrees, mixe Umber with it, and when you have wrought it over, take a broad Pencil and frieze it over with Umber, and a little Sea-coale black.
For yellow Leather, take Masticot and yellow Oker, shadow it with Umber at your pleasure.
For black Leather for shooes, Lamp-black, shadowed with white Lead.
For white Leather, white Lead, shadowed with Ivory black.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis

Quotation

CHAP. I. Of Painting in Oyl, & the Materials thereof.
I. Painting in Oyl is nothing but the work or Art of Limning performed with colours made up or mixed with oyl.
II. The materials of Painting are chiefly seven, 1.
The Easel, 2. The Pallet, 3. The Straining frame, 4. The Primed cloath, 5. Pensils, 6. The Stay, 7. Colours. [...] VI. The Primed cloath is that which is to be painted upon ; and is thus prepared.
[...].

canvas

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → outils
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la peinture

Quotation

A Straining-frame is nothing else but a frame made of wood, to which with nails you must fasten your Cloth that you are to paint upon ; of these Frames you should have of several sizes, according to the bigness of your Cloths.
By your Cloth I mean
Cloth primed. I could teach you how to prime it, but it is a moiling work, and besides, it may be bought ready primed cheaper and better than you can do it your self. Few Painters (though all can do it) prime it themselves, but buy it ready done.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → outils

Quotation

Chap XXVII, The Instruments and Materials usd in Painting and the preparing Colours to the Pallat.
[...].
[...] Your Cloath must be of an even thread : [...].

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → outils