MODERN

MODERN (n.)

HEUTIG (deu.) · JONG (nld.) · MODERN (deu.) · MODERN (nld.) · MODERNE (fra.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
NIEUW (nld.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
MODERNE (fra.)

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CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

2 sources
4 quotations

Quotation

Friend,
            When a Painter has acquired any Excellency in
Desinging, readily and strongly ; What has he to do next ?
                        Traveller,
            That is not half his Work, for then he must begin to mannage his
Colours, it being particularly by them, that he is to express the greatness of his Art. ’Tis they that give, as it were, Life and Soul to all that he does ; without them, his Lines will be but Lines that are flat, and without a Body, but the addition of Colours makes that appear round ; and as it were out of the Picture, which else would be plain and dull. ’Tis they that must deceive the Eye, to the degree, to make Flesh appear warm and soft, and to give an Air of Life, so as his Picture may seem almost to Breath and Move.
                        Friend,
            Did ever any Painter arrive to that Perfection you mention ?
                        Traveller,
            Yes, several, both of the
Antient and Modern Painters. Zeuxis Painted Grapes, so that the Birds flew at them to eat them. Apelles drew Horses to such a likeness, that upon setting them before live Horses, the Live ones Neighed, and began to kick at them, as being of their own kind. And amongst the Modern Painters, Hannibal Carache, relates to himself, That going to see Bassano at Venice, he went to take a Book off a Shelf, and found it to be the Picture of one, so lively done, that he who was a Great Painter, was deceived by it. The Flesh of Raphael’s Pictures are so Natural, that this seems to be Alive. And so do Titians Pictures, who was the Greatest Master for Colouring that ever was, having attained to imitate Humane Bodies in all the softness of Flesh, and beauty of Skin and Complexion.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

Traveller.
           
There wanted a Spirit and Life, which their Successors gave to their Works [ndr : les successeurs désignent les artistes de la génération suivant celle de Mantegna, A. da Messina, etc.] ; [...] Traveller.
           
There wanted a Spirit and Life, which their Successors gave to their Works [ndr : les successeurs désignent les artistes de la génération suivant celle de Mantegna, A. da Messina, etc.] ; and particularly, an Easiness ; which hides the pains and labour that the Artist has been at ; it being with Painting as with Poetry ; where, the greatest Art, is to conceal Art ; that is, that the Spectator may think that easie, which cost the Painter infinite Toyl and Labour : They had not likewise, that sweet Union of their Colours which was afterwards found out, and first attempted by Francia Bolognese, and Pietro Perugino ; and so pleasing it was to the Eye, that the People came in flocks to stair upon their Works, thinking it impossible to do better ; but they were soon undeceived by Leonardo da Vinci ; whom we must own as the Father of the Third Age of Painting, which we call the Modern ; and in him nothing was wanting ; for besides strength of Design, and true Drawing, he gave better Rules, more exact Measures, and was more profound in the Art than any before him.

Conceptual field(s)

MANIÈRE ET STYLE → école

Quotation

The Goût is a mixture of Poussin’s usual Manner [ndr : il s’agit ici du Tancrède et Herminie, réalisé par Poussin], and (what is very rare) a great deal of Guilio, particulary in the Head, and Attitude of the Lady, and both the Horses ; Tancred is naked to the Wast having been stripp’d by Erminia and his ’Squire to search for his Wounds, he has a piece of loose Drapery which is Yellow, bearing upon the Red in the Middle Tincts, and Shadows, this is thrown over his Belly, and Thighs, and lyes a good length upon the ground ; ’twas doubtless painted by the Life, and is intirely of a Modern Taste. And that nothing might be shocking, or disagreeable, the wounds are much hid, nor is his Body, or Garment stain’d with Blood, only some appears here, and there upon the ground just below the Drapery, as if it flow’d from some Wounds which That cover’d ;

term translated by MODERNE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 44-45.

Conceptual field(s)

MANIÈRE ET STYLE → école

Quotation

The Painters of the Roman School were the Best Designers, and had more of the Antique Taste in their Works than any of the Others, but generally they were not good Colourists ; Those of Florence were good Designers, and had a Kind of Greatness, but ‘twas not Antique. The Venetian, and Lombard Schools had Excellent Colourists, and a certain Grace but entirely Modern, especially those of Venice ; but their Drawing was generally Incorrect, and their Knowledge in History, and the Antique very little :

École lombarde
École vénitienne

term translated by MODERNE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 172-173.

Conceptual field(s)

MANIÈRE ET STYLE → école
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection