ERVARENHEID

ERVARENHEID (n. f.)

ERFAHRENHEIT (deu.) · ERFAHRUNG (deu.) · EXPERENCIA (lat.) · EXPERIENCE (eng.) · EXPÉRIENCE (fra.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
/ · ERFAHRENHEIT (deu.) · ERFAHRUNG (deu.) · EXPERIENCE (eng.) · SKILL (eng.)

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

4 sources
6 quotations

Quotation

Soo gaet het dan vast en wy houden ’t daer voor, dat een fijn en bequaem Konstenaer boven alle dinghen nae een natuyr-kondighe ervaerenheyd behoort te trachten: Niet dat wy hem erghens in een kluyse soecken op te sluyten, om aldaer sijnen kop met verscheyden Geometrische proef-stucken te breken; veel min dat hy ’t ghevoelen van soo veele teghenstrijdighe ghesintheden der naturelicker Philosophen in sijne eenigheyd besighlick soude siften, om daer uyt den rechten aerd van allerley harts-tocht ende beweginghen volmaecktelick te verstaen: Dit en is de meyninghe niet: Want wy het ghenoegh achten dat hy door deen daghelicksche opmerckinghe uytvinde hoe de menighvuldighe gheneghenheden ende beroerten onses ghemoeds ’t gebaer onses aenghesichts dus of soo veranderen ende ontstellen. Elcke beroerte onses ghemoeds, seght Cicero {Lib. III de Oratore}, ontfanght een seker ghelaet van de nature, ’t welck men voor ’t bysondere ende eyghene ghelaet der selvigher beroerte houden magh.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] It is certainly so and we believe that a fine and able Artist should above all aim for an experience of natural things: Not that we intend to lock him up in a vault somewhere, to break his head on different Geometrical tests; even less that he would go through the experience of so many contrasting opinions of the natural Philosophers by himself, in order to perfectly understand the true nature of all sorts of passion and movements: This is not the opinion: Because we think it is enough that he finds out through a daily observation how the manifold situations and commotions of our mind change and startle the gesture of our face. Every commotion of our mind, says Cicero {…}, receives a certain feature from nature, which one may interpret as the special and particular feature of this commotion.

Junius elaborates on the amount of knowledge an artist has to acquire on subjects like geometry and philosophy in order to understand passions (hartstocht) and emotions (beweging / beroering). He concludes that a certain experience (ervarenheid) is necessary, rather than an in-depth study. This experience can be acquired by means of a close observation (opmerking) of facial expressions (gelaat) and emotions. [MO]

term translated by / in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 140 in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 235
term translated by / in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 140 in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 235

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Ghelijck dan de oude Konstenaers een seer treffelicke maniere van wercken ghehadt hebben, soo hadden sy mede een sonderlinghe gaeve om sich de waere verbeeldinghe van allerley beweghinghen onses ghemoeds op ’t aller levendighste voor te stellen; ja wy moghen ’t oock vrijelick daer voor houden, dat sy haere wercken nimmermeer met sulcke bequaeme uytdruckinghen van de verscheydene herts-tochten souden vervult hebben, ’t en waer saecke dat sy met pijne waerd gheacht hadden alle die naturelicke beroerten wijslick nae te speuren door de welcke ons ghemoed verruckt ende den gewoonlicken schijn onses wesens verscheydenlick verandert wordt. Zeuxis heeft de schilderije van Penelope gemaeckt, so dat hy de sedigheyd haeres eerbaeren wesens daer in konstighlick schijnt uytghedruckt te hebben. Plin. XXXV.9. Timomachus heeft den raesenden Aiax afghemaelt, en hoe hy sich in dese uytsinnighe dolligheyd al aenstelde Philostr. Lib. II. de vita Apollonii. Cap. 10. Silanion heeft den wrevelmoedighen Konstenaer Apollodorus ghemaeckt; ende overmids desen Apollodorus eenen rechten korselkop was, soo ist dat Silanion niet alleen den Konstenaer selver, maer sijn koppighe krijghelheydt met eenen oock in ’t koper heeft ghegoten Plin. XXXIV.8. Protogenes heeft Philiscus geschildert, als wesende met eenighe diepe bedenckinghen opghenomen Plin. XXXV.10. Praxiteles heeft Phryne ghemackt, als of men haer weelderigh herte in een volle Zee van vreughd en wellust sach swemmen, Plin. XXXIV.8. Parrhasius maeckten eenen jonghelingh die in sijne wapenrustinge om strijd loopt, Plin. XXXV.10. Den Anapanomenos van Aristides sterft uyt liefde van sijnen broeder, Plin. ibidem. Philostratus {Iconoum Lib. I. in Ariadne} beschrijft ons de schilderije van eenen Bacchus die maer alleen bekent wordt by de minne-stuypen die hem quellen. Dese exempelen gheven ons ghenoegh te verstaen, hoe grooten ervaerenheyd d’oude Meesters in’t uytdrucken van allerley beroerten ende beweghinghen ghehad hebben;

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Just like the old Artists had a very striking manner of working, as such they had a special gift to imagine the true representation of all sorts of movements of our mind in the most lively way; yes we may also interpret freely, that they would never have filled their works again with such able expressions of the different passions, if they had not have thought it painfully worthful to wisely trace all those natural commotions by which our mind delights and the common appearance of our being is changed varyingly. Zeuxis has made a painting of Penelope, in a way that he appears to have artfully depicted the modesty of her being. Plin. XXXV.9. Timomachus has depicted the raging Aiax, and how he behaved in this outrageous madness Philostr. Lib. II. de vita Apollonii.Cap. 10. Silanion has made the resentful Artist Apollodorus; and as this Apollodorus was a grumpy guy, Silanion did not only cast the Artist himself, but also his stubborn touchiness Plin. XXXIV.8. Protogenes has painted Philiscus, being taken by deep reflections Plin. XXXV.10. Praxiteles has made Phyrne, as if one saw her luxuriant heart bathe in a great see of happiness and lust, Plin. XXXIV.8. Parrhasius made a young man who is walking around in his armour looking for a fight, Plin. ibidem. Philostratus {…} describes a painting to us of a Bacchus who can only be recognized by the heartaches that torture him. These examples illustrate clearly enough, how big a skill the old Masters have had in expressing all sorts of commotions and movements;

Only the citations are mentioned in the Latin edition, but there is no commentary, like in the Dutch and English edition. [MO]

term translated by EXPERIENCE in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 236-237

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Een oprecht Konstenaer schept sijn meeste vermaeck in de volheyd van een overvloedighe ende onvernepen materie: Want hy het oordeelt met de vrijheyd van sijn edel ende onbepaelt ghemoed allerbest over een te komen, dat sich d’ongherustheyd sijnes werckenden hoofds midsgaders oock de voordvaerendheyd sijner Konst-oeffeninge aen een Beelden-rijck argument soude gaen verbinden. Het quelt sijnen wackeren werckelicken gheest, alsmen hem een dorre en schraele Inventie voorstelt; en ghelijck hy altijd nae een ghenoegsaeme stoffe is wenschende, soo soeckt hy de ruymigheyd der gantscher stoffe in ’t ghemeyn en alle de ghedeelten der selvigher in ’t bysondere nae den eysch haerer gheleghenheyd bequamelick te schicken en uyt te wercken; vermids het hem niet en kan onbekent sijn, dat sich d’uytnemenheyd sijnes verstands als oock d’ervaerenheyd sijner Konste allermeest in de menighte der voorghestelder dingen plaght t’openbaeren;

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] A sincere Artist takes the most delight in the fullness of an abundant and undiminished matter: Because he believes that it coincides best with the freedom of his noble and unrestricted mind, that together with the unrest of his working head, the energy of his Art-practice would also connect with an ornate argument. It pains his alert truthful mind, when they propose him a barren and poor Invention; and like he always wishes for a satisfying material, as such he attempts to capably order and produce the spatiousness of the whole material in general and all the parts of it in particular, after the demands of their situation; while it cannot be unknown to him, that excellence of his mind as well as the experience of his Art demonstrates itself most in the abundance of the depicted things;

Junius discusses how an artist should best approach the subject (materie, argument, stof) of a painting, without neglecting its width. He can use different qualities, such as his freedom (vrijheid), mind (verstand) and experience (ervarenheid), to order the story to the best circumstances and come to a pleasing wholesome result (welstand). This section is not included in the Latin edition of 1637. [MO]

term translated by SKILL in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 313-314

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Want dewijle de Tafereelen onder verscheydene uytleggers dickwils dapper door de Pijcke danssen, ende lijden moeten dat de gedachten, en ’t voornemen vanden Schilder, d’uytlegh ende waerheyt der Historye, de rede vande plaets, d’Ordinantie der inventy, mogelijckheyt der doeningen, ware proportionele Teyckeningh, Kleedingen ende toestelselen, ende andere behoorlijcke hoedanigheden meer, ge-examineert, ende bedisputeert wert; dat menighmael occasie verschaft, om de groote of kleyne ervarentheyt van een Meester uyt te vinden, ’t geen dikwils in eenige kleynigheden ontdeckt wert, ja in soodanighe daer een omsichtighen Meester nimmer op ghedacht en heeft, veel min een slecht hooft.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Because while the Paintings often ache heavily under the different people who explain them, and have to suffer that the thoughts and the intention of the Painter, the explanation and the truth of the History, the reasoning of place, the Composition of the invention, the possibility of action, the true proportional Design, Clothing and hues, and yet other decent things, will be examined and disputed; which often gives the opportunity to find out the great or small experience of a Master, which often can be discerned in small things, yes as a careful Master has never thought of it, even less a minor spirit.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

So isset boven alle ’t gene geseyd is ook misgetast te meenen datmen alleen door veel na het leven te Teyckenen (en dat even soo als ’t ons voorkomt te volgen) tot de voorgestelde trap der ware Menschkunde kan komen: want na dienmen met onbereyde oogen en zinnen, tot het Leven komende, veel dingen in het leven niet en kan sien, om dat noch door een bysondere voorbereydinge de oogen niet open gedaan zijn, (of soo mense ziet, niet verstaat watse in dat geval daarmense ontwaar werd, voor dienst en werking hebben) soo gebeurd het datmense onkundig en onseker aantast; en dickmaal stilstaande spieren ’t onregt in haar uyterste vermogen, en sterck werckende in een gemeene, of geheel niet werkende stand aansiet en vertoond. […] Waarlijck, L. de Vincy en taste niet geheel mis, als hy seyde dat de Schilders welcke naakte beelden buyten de grondige ervarentheyd der Menschkunde schilderden, niet anders dan de opperste huyd der beelden maakten, maar niets van het Beeld self, nog yets dat aan sijn werckelijcke actien of inwendige geest deelachtig is. Men leeft van seker verstandig meester die van sijn leerlingen niet alleen begeerde dat sy in het ondersoeken der muskelen die souden afteyckenen, en by geschrifte aanteekenen wat Spieren en Pesen sich in yder lit volgens sekere bepaalde actien en bewegingen lieten sien of verscholen of het meeste werk, of niet met allen deeden; {Naukeurige maniere om den aart der muskelen te verstaan.} maar hy begeerde selfs datse ontrent de lichaamtjes der kleyne kinderen, van haar geboorte aan tot hun volle wasdom en van daar tot haar hoogste jaren, door alle trappen des ouderdoms en verandering die in yder lit en in de samenvoegselen valt, souden opschrijven, welcke dicker, welke vetter, en welcke magerder wierden; en met welck een onderscheyd, sy in d’een en d’ander staat en stand te kennen waren; ’t geen waarlijck een groote ervarentheyd heeft te weegh gebracht.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Besides all that has been said it is also a mistake to think that one can only reach the envisioned step of true Anatomy by drawing a lot after life (and imitate it this just like it appears to us): because since one, approaching Life with unprepared eyes and senses, cannot see many things in life, because the eyes have not been opened by a special preparation, (or, if one can see them, will in that case not understand what function and action they have) as such it happens that one ruins them through incapably and uncertainly; and often see and show unmoving muscles in their uttermost power, and forcefully working [muscles, ndr.] in a common, or completely silent posture. […] Truly, Leonardo da Vinci was not completely mistaken, when he said that the painters who painted the naked figures without a profound experience of Anatomy, made nothing but the epidermis of the figures, but nothing of the figure itself, nor something that had to do with his true actions or internal mind. There was a certain wise master who did not only ask from his pupils that they would draw the muscles while they were studying them and note by writings which muscles and tendons showed or hid themselves in each limb with certain actions and movements or which did the most work or not with all; {Precise manner to understand the nature of muscles.} but he even wanted them to write about the little bodies of small children, from their birth until their full maturity and from that moment until their old age, through all the different ages and change that happens in each limb and in their assembly, which one became thicker, which fatter, which leaner; and with which difference they could be seen in one or another state or posture; which has truly instilled a great experience.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

{Stoffe deezes Hooftdeels.} ’t Is gantschelijk noodig, datwe een Hooftdeel maaken van allerhande zoorten van ligten en brand, die des nagts aangesteeken zijnde wonderlijk de omleggende lichchaamen doen tevoorschijn komen, en in zoo veelerhande verscheidentheid, datze onbeschrijvelijk is.
{Moeyelijkheid.} Daar uit ligt te verstaan is, dat de oeffeninge van deeze stoffe, om ‘er in tot eenige zoorte van volmaaktheid en vastigheid te geraaken, al vry swaar is, en dat ‘er om verscheide vertooningen van nagtligten wel uit te drukken veel overleg voorzigtigheid en beschouwinge van de natuir en ervarentheid van nooden is.
{Aanbieding van hulpe.} Wy zullen de Leerling eenige aanmerkingen van de voorname voorvallen ter hand stellen; om hen zoo op de weg te helpen; wel weetende, dat het gebruik en oordeel hier ’t voornaamste werk moeten doen.
{Algemeener aanmerkinge van nagtligt.} Alle schaduwen zijn hier sterk en kantig; en om in ’t gemeen wat te zeggen van
toortzen, fakkelen en lampen; zoo weet, datze byna op eene wijze te behandelen zijn; […]

[translation: BEURS, en préparation, transl. Myra Scholz:] {Subjects of the this chapter} It is definitely necessary for us to devote a chapter to all kinds light and fire, which when burning at night lend the surrounding objects a wondrous appearance, and in so many different ways that they defy description. {Difficulty} It is obvious, then, that practicing this material in order to achieve some degree of perfection and competence is quite difficult, and that rendering various manifestations of nocturnal lights requires a great deal of thought, care, observation of nature, and experience. {Offer of assistance} We will provide the pupil with a few pointers about the most important types in order to help him on his way, knowing that practice and good judgment have to do most of the work here. {General remarks about nocturnal light} All shadows here are strong and sharp-edged. And to make a general statement about torches, firebrands, and lamps: They can all be dealt with in much the same way.[…]

Conceptual field(s)