TEMPER (TO) (v.)

DÉTREMPER (fra.) · MÉLANGER (fra.) · MÊLER (fra.) · TEMPERIEREN (deu.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
DÉTREMPER (fra.) · TEMPEREN (nld.) · VERDIEPEN (nld.)

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LINKED QUOTATIONS

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3 quotations

Quotation

Of painting in Oyle.
Here you must provide one thing more then you did before : that is, a Pallet (so called by Artists) whereupon you must put a small quantitie of every such colour you are to use, the forme whereof followeth [ndr : présence d’un dessin de palette au dessous de ce paragraphe].

The colours to be used, are altogether such dry substances as I mentioned formerly : as Oker, Vermilion red lead, Umber, Spanish browne, Lam-blacke, Gambugice, Masticot, Orpment, Ceruse, or Spanish white, blew and greene Bise, Verdigrease, and a multitude of such like, which may be had at the Rose in
Cornehill, London.
Your colours must be ground all very finely, and tempered with Linseed oyle ; and to preserve them, put them in little earthen pans, and put water upon them, and cover them, that the dust come not at them : thus they may be kept a great while, and from thence you may take them as your use doth require.
There are divers colours which without the admixture of another colour, will not be dry a great while ; as Lake, Verdigrease, Lam-blacke : with such you must temper a little Umber or red lead.
Divers Painters there are, that having haste of worke, doe use to temper their colour with one part of fatte oyle, and two of common Linseed oyle, and by this meanes they make the colours dry the sonner : this fat oyle is onely Linseed oyle exposed to the weather, and so it becommeth thicker : yea sometimes you shall see it so thicke, that you may cut it almost like Butter : it may bee made likewise by boyling of it a little while, but the former is the best. As for the tempering of your colours, I can prescribe no surer way then experience with diligent observation.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Observe (in each particular) what is directed in this Colour of washing, grinding, tempering. A Rule for all the other Colours, that are to be ground.
{Colours to be washt and ground.} Some
Colours are to be washt and ground, and they are these. […].
{To be washt only.} Other to be washt only, are these. […].
{But five perfect Colours.} There are but five perfect Colours (
white and black being none) like the five precious stones perfect and transparent severall Colours. 
The hard Topas for Yellow, the Amethyst orient for Murray, the Rubie for Red, Saphire for Blew, Emrauld for Green. All which Colours are perfect different from mixture of white […].
 
Colours, to be grinded.
[…].


Colours to be washed, and not to be ground.
[…].

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Some further Directions how to temper and mingle your Colours by way of Composition or Temperature, to make all these following Colours, and also the manner how to Deepen or Shadow them.


For Carnatian temper Lake and White, and deepen it or shadow it with Lake.
For a Violet temper fine
Dutch Bice and Lake, and deepen it with Indigo.
[…].

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs