GRIS (n.)

GRAU (deu.) · GRAU (deu.) · GRAUW (GRADATION OF COLOUR) (nld.) · GREY (eng.) · GRIGIO (ita.) · GRIJS (nld.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
GREY (eng.)

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LINKED QUOTATIONS

2 sources
3 quotations

Quotation

A Glassie Gray.
The word Glasse is selfe commeth from the Belgick and high Dutch : Glasse from the verbe
Glansen which signifieth amongst them to shine, from the Greeke […] the same, or perhaps for glacies in the Latine, which Ice, whose colour it resembleth, in French it is called Coleur de voir, in Italian vitreo color di vetro, in high Dutch Glasgrum, in Spanish Color vidrial, in Greeke ὑάλινον of ὑαλος, that is moist, and that from pluere, to raine, from whence also proceed those words in Latine, humus, udus, &c. It is an ayery and greenish white, it serveth to imitate at sometime the skie-glasses of all sorts, fountaines and the like […].

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Ash colour or gray.
In Latine
color Cinerius, in French Coleur cendree, ou grise, Italian Griso beretino, Germane Aschen-frab, Hispan. color de cenizas, In Greeke τεφρώδης […].

cendré

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

XXIII.
Il y a diverses sortes de Fonds pour les Tableaux & les Portraits, les uns sont tout à fait bruns composez de Bistre, de Terre d’Ombre, ou de Terre de Cologne, avec un peu de Noir & de Blanc : D’autres plus Jaunes, où l’on mesle beaucoup d’Occre ; & d’autres plus Gris, où l’on met de l’Inde. Pour les peindre faites un Lavis de la couleur ou du Mélange que vous les voudrez faire, ou selon que sera le Tableau ou le Portrait que vous copierez ; c’est à dire, une Couche fort legere, dans laquelle il n’y ait quasi que de l’eau afin d’emboire le veslin ; en suite repasser une autre couche plus épaisse, & l’étendez fort uniement à grands coups, le plus viste que vous pourrez, ne touchant pas deux fois en un mesme endroit avant qu’il soit sec, parce que le second coup emporte ce que l’on a mis au premier, particulierement quand on appuye un peu trop le Pinceau.

term translated by GREY in BOUTET, Claude, The Art of Painting in Miniature: Teaching The speedy and perfect Acquisition of that Art without a Master. By Rules so easy, and in a Method so natural as to render this charming Accomplishment universally attainable. Containing I. The Difference between Painting in Miniature, and other Kinds of Painting. II. The Management of Colours in Draperies, Linnen, Lace, Furrs, &c. III. The Method of mixing Colours for Carnations ; for painting of Architecture, or any Building of Stone or Wood ; for Landskips, Terrasses, Water, Ruins, Rocks, &c. IV. The Art of Painting all Sorts of Flowers, with the proper Colours required to represent Nature to the highest Perfection. V. The various Methods of Painting. Translated from the Original French. The Fourth Edition. To which are now added, I. Certain Secrets of one of the greatest Italian Painters for making the finest Colours, Burnished Gold, Shell Gold, &c. II. Some general instructive Lessons for the Art of Drawing. And III. The Usefulness and Benefit of Prints, London, J. Hodges - J. James - T. Cooper, 1739., p. 19-20.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs