SADELER, Jan ( v. 1550-1600 )

SADELER, Jan ( v. 1550-1600 )

ISNI:0000000108660175 Getty:500020677

Quotation

Dans l’Allemagne du temps de l’Empereur Rodolphe, il y a eu des Sadelers, Gille, Jean, & Raphaël,  tous trois bons Graveurs, lesquels ont fait de si beaux Ouvrages, qu’il reste un regret en les voyans, qu’ils n’ayent esté du temps de Raphaël d’Urbin, car ils estoient à mon sens tres-capables de copier ou imiter ponctuellement toutes sortes de manieres, & d’exprimer és Tableaux la pluspart des tendresses du Colory, & aussi avec grande justesse & Art, les testes, pieds, mains, & autres petites parties qui y sont comprises, tesmoins de Jean & de Raphaël en ce qu’ils ont executé d’après M. de Vos, le Bassan & autres ; [...] & quantité d’autres [ndr : d’autres graveurs], lesquelles on peut dire estre merveilleusement bien gravée, & avec grande netteté, jugement & Art.

Quotation

The second Division by Landskips : The Tablet.
{Tablet for Landskip.} […].
Green, of all Colours is most delightfull to the Eye. Not in all Art of Painting such variety of Colour, more pleasing then is the Prospect of a well-wrought Landskip ; especially when your ingenious Industry hath already rendred you a Master of Art and contemplation. {Landskip after the Life, the way to draw it.} If you draw a Prospect from the Life ; Take your Station upon the rize of ground, or top of an Hill, where you shall have a large Horizon ; and skore your Tablet into three divisions downwards, from the top to the bottome, set your face directly opposite to the midst of your Horizon, and keeping your body fixed, Observe what is comprehended directly before your eyes, and draw that into forme upon your Tablet in the middle Division.
[…].
And as all things appear in
Distance and Truth, Proportion and Colour, so be carefull to express them ; […]. So then, the Dutch in composing a Piece of Prospect, of their own Fancie and Invention, for want of the Life most grosly erre in Proportion, Distance and Colour. Now for the want of the Life and Nature, if you will adventure on your fancie ; Go to work this way.
I cannot prescribe, how to order your light, in a piece of Landskip by the Life ; for according to the place, as you look North, or Southward, East, or West-ward, as the time of the day and the Sun’s declination, so must you order your shadows as they appear. But in all working of Painting by Fancie, let your light descend from your left, to your right hand : So will it appear upon the work, from the right to the left, the more gracefull. […].
{To make a Landskip.} In making it ; First, beginne with a large
skie or Element and if there be any shining or reflection of the Sunne, (in which only the Dutch are neat and curious,) then you must be carefull, by no meanes to mixe Red-lead, or Mene, in the purple of the skie, or Clouds, but only with Lake and White ; […] For you must not mingle the blew Colours of the Clouds with any Pensil that hath touched Masticoate ; It will make the skie Greenish and discoloured.
[…].

{
Paul Brell’s observations.} The most generall and absolute Rule in Landskip, was observed by that excellent Master at Rome, Paul Brell, whose delightfull works many of them extent in Prints, are set out by Raphael and John Sadler. Besides many Paintings of his own hand both in Frescoe and Oyle, in the Pallace of Cardinal Montaltre, by St. Maria Mahgior, Bentoglia in Mount Gaballo, and in the Church of St. Cecillia ; His observation is onely this, That an Artist must be sure to make all his shadows fall one way ; that is, to place light against dark, and dark against light. {Light against dark, et è contrario.} His meaning is, that to oppose Light to shadows, is only to remove and extend the Prospect, and to make it shew far off, yet so as ever they must lose their force of vigour as they remove from the eye, and if strongest alwaies neerest at hand, and as they fall on the first ground.
[…].

Quotation

Du Paysage.
Ceux qui ont la pratique de l’eau forte peuvent en faire le contour, particulierement du feuillage des arbres : cela est un peu plus prompt, & ne fait pas plus mal, pourvû qu’on ait la discrétion de ne le pas faire trop fort, & qu’en l’achevant avec le Burin,  l’Eau Forte ne s’en remarque pas, d’autant qu’il n’auroit pas la même douceur.
[p. 111 165]
Pour le bien faire, je tiens qu’il faut se conformer à la maniere d’Augustin Carrache, qui le touchoit merveilleusement bien : mais on peut le finir davantage suivant l’occasion. Villamene & Jean Sadeler l’ont aussi fort bien touché, ainsi que Corneille Cort qui en a gravé plusieurs d’après le Mutian qui sont très-beaux, & dont on peut se sevir pour guide.

Quotation

The most generall and absolute Rule in Landskip, was observed by that excellent Master at Rome, Paul Brell, whose delightfull works many of them extent in Prints, are set out by Raphael and John Sadler. Besides many Paintings of his own hand both in Frescoe and Oyle, in the Pallace of Cardinal Montaltre, by St. Maria Mahgior, Bentoglia in Mount Gaballo, and in the Church of St. Cecillia ; His observation is onely this, That an Artist must be sure to make all his shadows fall one way ; that is, to place light against dark, and dark against light. {Light against dark, et è contrario.} His meaning is, that to oppose Light to shadows, is only to remove and extend the Prospect, and to make it shew far off, yet so as ever they must lose their force of vigour as they remove from the eye, and if strongest alwaies neerest at hand, and as they fall on the first ground.
[…].

The uppermost of all, you are last of all to express by lightly touching the exteriour
edges and brimes of some of the former leaves, with a little green Masticoate, and white. If deeper, darkest shadows, you may well set off with sap-green and Indico. Only remember, that both in the leaves and trees, Rivers, and far distant Mountains, you must affect, to express certain reall Morrice-dello (as Paul Brell calls it), or soft delicateness, which is the very next remarkable in the worke.
[…].

Quotation

Dans l’Allemagne du temps de l’Empereur Rodolphe, il y a eu des Sadelers, Gille, Jean, & Raphaël,  tous trois bons Graveurs, lesquels ont fait de si beaux Ouvrages, qu’il reste un regret en les voyans, qu’ils n’ayent esté du temps de Raphaël d’Urbin, car ils estoient à mon sens tres-capables de copier ou imiter ponctuellement toutes sortes de manieres, & d’exprimer és Tableaux la pluspart des tendresses du Colory, & aussi avec grande justesse & Art, les testes, pieds, mains, & autres petites parties qui y sont comprises, tesmoins de Jean & de Raphaël en ce qu’ils ont executé d’après M. de Vos, le Bassan & autres ; [...] & quantité d’autres [ndr : d’autres graveurs], lesquelles on peut dire estre merveilleusement bien gravée, & avec grande netteté, jugement & Art.

Quotation

The second Division by Landskips : The Tablet.
{Tablet for Landskip.} […].
Green, of all Colours is most delightfull to the Eye. Not in all Art of Painting such variety of Colour, more pleasing then is the Prospect of a well-wrought Landskip ; especially when your ingenious Industry hath already rendred you a Master of Art and contemplation. {Landskip after the Life, the way to draw it.} If you draw a Prospect from the Life ; Take your Station upon the rize of ground, or top of an Hill, where you shall have a large Horizon ; and skore your Tablet into three divisions downwards, from the top to the bottome, set your face directly opposite to the midst of your Horizon, and keeping your body fixed, Observe what is comprehended directly before your eyes, and draw that into forme upon your Tablet in the middle Division.
[…].
And as all things appear in
Distance and Truth, Proportion and Colour, so be carefull to express them ; […]. So then, the Dutch in composing a Piece of Prospect, of their own Fancie and Invention, for want of the Life most grosly erre in Proportion, Distance and Colour. Now for the want of the Life and Nature, if you will adventure on your fancie ; Go to work this way.
I cannot prescribe, how to order your light, in a piece of Landskip by the Life ; for according to the place, as you look North, or Southward, East, or West-ward, as the time of the day and the Sun’s declination, so must you order your shadows as they appear. But in all working of Painting by Fancie, let your light descend from your left, to your right hand : So will it appear upon the work, from the right to the left, the more gracefull. […].
{To make a Landskip.} In making it ; First, beginne with a large
skie or Element and if there be any shining or reflection of the Sunne, (in which only the Dutch are neat and curious,) then you must be carefull, by no meanes to mixe Red-lead, or Mene, in the purple of the skie, or Clouds, but only with Lake and White ; […] For you must not mingle the blew Colours of the Clouds with any Pensil that hath touched Masticoate ; It will make the skie Greenish and discoloured.
[…].

{
Paul Brell’s observations.} The most generall and absolute Rule in Landskip, was observed by that excellent Master at Rome, Paul Brell, whose delightfull works many of them extent in Prints, are set out by Raphael and John Sadler. Besides many Paintings of his own hand both in Frescoe and Oyle, in the Pallace of Cardinal Montaltre, by St. Maria Mahgior, Bentoglia in Mount Gaballo, and in the Church of St. Cecillia ; His observation is onely this, That an Artist must be sure to make all his shadows fall one way ; that is, to place light against dark, and dark against light. {Light against dark, et è contrario.} His meaning is, that to oppose Light to shadows, is only to remove and extend the Prospect, and to make it shew far off, yet so as ever they must lose their force of vigour as they remove from the eye, and if strongest alwaies neerest at hand, and as they fall on the first ground.
[…].

Quotation

The most generall and absolute Rule in Landskip, was observed by that excellent Master at Rome, Paul Brell, whose delightfull works many of them extent in Prints, are set out by Raphael and John Sadler. Besides many Paintings of his own hand both in Frescoe and Oyle, in the Pallace of Cardinal Montaltre, by St. Maria Mahgior, Bentoglia in Mount Gaballo, and in the Church of St. Cecillia ; His observation is onely this, That an Artist must be sure to make all his shadows fall one way ; that is, to place light against dark, and dark against light. {Light against dark, et è contrario.} His meaning is, that to oppose Light to shadows, is only to remove and extend the Prospect, and to make it shew far off, yet so as ever they must lose their force of vigour as they remove from the eye, and if strongest alwaies neerest at hand, and as they fall on the first ground.
[…].

The uppermost of all, you are last of all to express by lightly touching the exteriour
edges and brimes of some of the former leaves, with a little green Masticoate, and white. If deeper, darkest shadows, you may well set off with sap-green and Indico. Only remember, that both in the leaves and trees, Rivers, and far distant Mountains, you must affect, to express certain reall Morrice-dello (as Paul Brell calls it), or soft delicateness, which is the very next remarkable in the worke.
[…].

Quotation

Du Paysage.
Ceux qui ont la pratique de l’eau forte peuvent en faire le contour, particulierement du feuillage des arbres : cela est un peu plus prompt, & ne fait pas plus mal, pourvû qu’on ait la discrétion de ne le pas faire trop fort, & qu’en l’achevant avec le Burin,  l’Eau Forte ne s’en remarque pas, d’autant qu’il n’auroit pas la même douceur.
[p. 111 165]
Pour le bien faire, je tiens qu’il faut se conformer à la maniere d’Augustin Carrache, qui le touchoit merveilleusement bien : mais on peut le finir davantage suivant l’occasion. Villamene & Jean Sadeler l’ont aussi fort bien touché, ainsi que Corneille Cort qui en a gravé plusieurs d’après le Mutian qui sont très-beaux, & dont on peut se sevir pour guide.