BRISKNESS (n.)

VIVACITÉ (fra.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
FIERTÉ (fra.)

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LINKED QUOTATIONS

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3 quotations

Quotation

Diligently observe what Colours bare a Sympathy or Antipathy to each other, and order your mixtures on your Pallate accordingly, as Blew and Yellow make a Green but Blew and Vermilion produce a Nigre Colour.
            In the disposal of Colours on a Picture, consider the whitest Colours are not always the Stronger, but as they are Luminous or agreeing with the Light, as
Vermilion is stronger then Green brought up to the same Height : and Yellow Masticot is stronger then White Masticot and will be seen at a greater Distance.
            Those Colours must be laid near to one another, that are proper of their own nature to help one another, and give a mutual help to rayse up their Briskness, as the
Red doth to the Green, and the Yellow to the Blew, &c.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

In Carnations, we must avoid the Affectation of too many Clear Red Colours, which more resemble the Skin when Flead of, then the true Natural Skin.
            Nor must we affect the diversity of
Sparkling and Glowing Colours, as the Bright of Diaphanous Bodys, which represent reflections of the variety of Neighbouring Colours ; always remembring, that mans Skin how Beautiful soever, dwells in a delicate down-Colour.
            We must observe in the
Contrast, or the Opposition which Intervenes in the Union of Colours ; that by a sweet Interruption it may rayse up its Briskness, without it a fading Disagreeableness ensues.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

In great works we mnst lay the Colours on Full, that we may Empast and Incorporate them sweetly, and that will make them to hold Firm and be lasting.
[...].
Colours must be so laid together, that they may be all sweetly united under the Briskness of a principall one, that it may participate of the Light which is chief over all the rest in the Picture ; and that all the Colours be Connected together by an agreeable Union, and likewise so dispos’d as they may partake of each other, by the Communication of the Light and help of Reflection.
We must not only avoid all
Garrish and Gaudy Colouring (the Effect of a poor Judgment) but likewise a Briskness in the Meaner Parts which may any way hurt the Eye of the Picture.
We must observe to lay the Colours very strong at first, because it is easy to weaken what we would put back ; but more difficult to give a strength, where it is weakly put in.
[...] We must have regard to the scituation of Colours, where we must observe to put before the Picture, those which are Naturally the stronger and of the greatest Purity ; that by the Force of their Briskness, we may keep back the Force of them which are Compounded, and which must appear at a distance ; [...].

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs