STREATER, Robert ( 1624-1680 )

STREATER, Robert ( 1624-1680 )

ISNI:0000000066819095 Getty:500005581

Quotation

The most generall and absolute Rule in Landskip, was observed by that excellent Master at Rome, Paul Brell, whose delightfull works many of them extent in Prints, are set out by Raphael and John Sadler. Besides many Paintings of his own hand both in Frescoe and Oyle, in the Pallace of Cardinal Montaltre, by St. Maria Mahgior, Bentoglia in Mount Gaballo, and in the Church of St. Cecillia ; His observation is onely this, That an Artist must be sure to make all his shadows fall one way ; that is, to place light against dark, and dark against light. {Light against dark, et è contrario.} His meaning is, that to oppose Light to shadows, is only to remove and extend the Prospect, and to make it shew far off, yet so as ever they must lose their force of vigour as they remove from the eye, and if strongest alwaies neerest at hand, and as they fall on the first ground.
[…].

The uppermost of all, you are last of all to express by lightly touching the exteriour
edges and brimes of some of the former leaves, with a little green Masticoate, and white. If deeper, darkest shadows, you may well set off with sap-green and Indico. Only remember, that both in the leaves and trees, Rivers, and far distant Mountains, you must affect, to express certain reall Morrice-dello (as Paul Brell calls it), or soft delicateness, which is the very next remarkable in the worke.
[…].

The greatest cunning herein is to cosen your own
eyes ; which yet, you cannot do, without their consent in assisting, by an apt accommodation of rarity of Colours, in their due places, In such manner, that many times in a Tablet of a span long, a man’s Imagination, may be carried quite out of the Country, Seas, and Citties, by a sure Piece of his own making. See Streeter’s most exact and rare Landskips in Oyl.

Quotation

The most generall and absolute Rule in Landskip, was observed by that excellent Master at Rome, Paul Brell, whose delightfull works many of them extent in Prints, are set out by Raphael and John Sadler. Besides many Paintings of his own hand both in Frescoe and Oyle, in the Pallace of Cardinal Montaltre, by St. Maria Mahgior, Bentoglia in Mount Gaballo, and in the Church of St. Cecillia ; His observation is onely this, That an Artist must be sure to make all his shadows fall one way ; that is, to place light against dark, and dark against light. {Light against dark, et è contrario.} His meaning is, that to oppose Light to shadows, is only to remove and extend the Prospect, and to make it shew far off, yet so as ever they must lose their force of vigour as they remove from the eye, and if strongest alwaies neerest at hand, and as they fall on the first ground.
[…].

The uppermost of all, you are last of all to express by lightly touching the exteriour
edges and brimes of some of the former leaves, with a little green Masticoate, and white. If deeper, darkest shadows, you may well set off with sap-green and Indico. Only remember, that both in the leaves and trees, Rivers, and far distant Mountains, you must affect, to express certain reall Morrice-dello (as Paul Brell calls it), or soft delicateness, which is the very next remarkable in the worke.
[…].

The greatest cunning herein is to cosen your own
eyes ; which yet, you cannot do, without their consent in assisting, by an apt accommodation of rarity of Colours, in their due places, In such manner, that many times in a Tablet of a span long, a man’s Imagination, may be carried quite out of the Country, Seas, and Citties, by a sure Piece of his own making. See Streeter’s most exact and rare Landskips in Oyl.