AVEMPACE, Ibn Baja

AVEMPACE, Ibn Baja

ISNI:0000000118742991

Quotation

Colour according to Scaliger is a qualitie compounded of the elements and the light, so farre forth as it is the light. Averrois and Avenpace, said it was actus corporis terminati ; others a bare superficies. Aristotle called it corporis extremitatem, the extremitie or outmost of a body. The object of the sight is any thing whatsoever may be visible, […].
Whether all colours be compounded of white and black or no.
Theophrastus hath long since laboured to proove blacke to be no colour at all, his reason is, because that colour is proper to none of the elements, for faith he, water, ayre and earth are white, and the fire is yellow, but rather would fetch it from white and yellow, whereto Scaliger leaving Aristotle, perhaps for singularitie sake, seemeth to give consent, who sets downe four primary or first colours, viz.
 
White in the dry body as the earth.
Greene in thicke and moyst as the water.
Blew in the thin and moyst as the ayre.
Yellow in the hot as the fire.
 
Yet not without reason, for
Aristotle affirmed that blacke was the privation of white, as darknesse of light, to that whom Scaliger replyes nothing can be made of privation and habit, but we will leave their argument.

Quotation

Colour according to Scaliger is a qualitie compounded of the elements and the light, so farre forth as it is the light. Averrois and Avenpace, said it was actus corporis terminati ; others a bare superficies. Aristotle called it corporis extremitatem, the extremitie or outmost of a body. The object of the sight is any thing whatsoever may be visible, […].
Whether all colours be compounded of white and black or no.
Theophrastus hath long since laboured to proove blacke to be no colour at all, his reason is, because that colour is proper to none of the elements, for faith he, water, ayre and earth are white, and the fire is yellow, but rather would fetch it from white and yellow, whereto Scaliger leaving Aristotle, perhaps for singularitie sake, seemeth to give consent, who sets downe four primary or first colours, viz.
 
White in the dry body as the earth.
Greene in thicke and moyst as the water.
Blew in the thin and moyst as the ayre.
Yellow in the hot as the fire.
 
Yet not without reason, for
Aristotle affirmed that blacke was the privation of white, as darknesse of light, to that whom Scaliger replyes nothing can be made of privation and habit, but we will leave their argument.