GREEN (n.)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGUREvêtements et plis
EFFET PICTURALqualité des couleurs
GENRES PICTURAUXpaysage
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVREcouleurs
ENGLISCH GRÜN (deu.) · GROEN (nld.) · GRÜN (deu.) · VERDE (ita.) · VERT (fra.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
VERT (fra.)
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23 quotations

Quotation

Whether all colours be compounded of white and black or no.
Theophrastus hath long since laboured to proove blacke to be no colour at all, his reason is, because that colour is proper to none of the elements, for faith he, water, ayre and earth are white, and the fire is yellow, but rather would fetch it from white and yellow, whereto Scaliger leaving Aristotle, perhaps for singularitie sake, seemeth to give consent, who sets downe four primary or first colours, viz.
 
White in the dry body as the earth.
Greene in thicke and moyst as the water.
Blew in the thin and moyst as the ayre.
Yellow in the hot as the fire.
 
Yet not without reason, for
Aristotle affirmed that blacke was the privation of white, as darknesse of light, to that whom Scaliger replyes nothing can be made of privation and habit, but we will leave their argument.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Of Greene
Our English word Greene is fetcht from the high Dutch
Grun, in the Belgick Groen, in French it is called Coleur verde, in Italian and Spanish Verde, from the Latine Viridis […] in Greeke χλωρὸν, that is, grasse or the greene herbe, which is of this colour […] : the greene we commonly use are these :
Greene Bice.
Vert-greece.
Verditure.
Sapgreene.
Of the blew and yellow, proceedeth the greene.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

A grassy or yellowish Greene.
In high Dutch
Grassgrum, in Belgick Gersgroen, […]. Italice verde de giallo. Hispanice verde qui tiene pocode Rurio, in Latine prassinus, in Greeke πράσινον of πρασόν which is Leeke, whose colour it resembleth, there is also a precious stone called prasites of the same colour. This colour is made grinding Ceruse with Pinke, or adding a little Verditure with the juyce of Rue or herbe Grace.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

An Emerauld Colour.
Take Verdigreese, and grinde it first dry, and put unto it a little of the Gall of the neat : also of Saffron, and the juyce of Rew, of each a little : grinde them together, and put them into a shell, and let it dry there : when you would use it, grinde it againe with Vineger or Verjuce, and a little neats gall dissolved in either of them. His false colour is two parts greene, and a third ceruse : it must bee sadded with a good greene.

A Motlie greene.
This colour is compounded of red and greene.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

A Lincoln-greene.
This colour is compounded of a good greene and Saffron.

A Poppin-jay greene.
This colour is compounded of azure, and masticot.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

A greene Colour.
Take Copper plates, put them in a copper pot, & put distilled vineger to them : set them in a warme place till the vinegar become blew, then put it out into another leaded pot, and poure more vinegar into it again ; let it stand so till it become blew ; this do so many times till you thinke you have enough : then let it stand till it be thicke.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Of Limning in Water-Colours
The True Order and Names of Colours, the means to prepare them for the Pensill and to clense them from their corrupt mixtures, wherewith they are Sophisticate.
We name them
Seaven (though in truth the first and last White and Black are no Colours ; but Elements.) [...] Greens,
Sap-green.
Pinck.
Bise-green.
Cedar-green
. [...] 4. Green, or Emrauld.
{4. Green, or Emrauld.}
Green ; the best is Cedar-green, in the place thereof, take Tripall, to draw with : Pink is also needfull for Landskips, mixed with Bise-ashes, makes another Green ; so likewise with Masticote and Ceruse, as you see cause. For light-greens, sap-greens, flour de Bise, tauny-green, needs nothing but steeped in water, which is best.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

The second Division by Landskips : The Tablet.
{Tablet for Landskip.} […].
Green, of all Colours is most delightfull to the Eye. Not in all Art of Painting such variety of Colour, more pleasing then is the Prospect of a well-wrought Landskip ; especially when your ingenious Industry hath already rendred you a Master of Art and contemplation. {Landskip after the Life, the way to draw it.} If you draw a Prospect from the Life ; Take your Station upon the rize of ground, or top of an Hill, where you shall have a large Horizon ; and skore your Tablet into three divisions downwards, from the top to the bottome, set your face directly opposite to the midst of your Horizon, and keeping your body fixed, Observe what is comprehended directly before your eyes, and draw that into forme upon your Tablet in the middle Division.
[…].
And as all things appear in
Distance and Truth, Proportion and Colour, so be carefull to express them ; […]. So then, the Dutch in composing a Piece of Prospect, of their own Fancie and Invention, for want of the Life most grosly erre in Proportion, Distance and Colour. Now for the want of the Life and Nature, if you will adventure on your fancie ; Go to work this way.

École espagnole
École italienne
École néerlandaise

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs
GENRES PICTURAUX → paysage

Quotation

The five perfect Colours, with their Lights and Shaddowes.
{Murray, or Amethyst.} The best for
Limning, is a Lake of it self, of a Murray colour, which is best made, and to be had at Venice, or in Flanders at Antwerp ; […]. [...] Greens,
Sap-green.
Pinck.
Bise-green.
Cedar-green
. [...] 4. Green, or Emrauld.
{4. Green, or Emrauld.}
Green ; the best is Cedar-green, in the place thereof, take Tripall, to draw with : Pink is also needfull for Landskips, mixed with Bise-ashes, makes another Green ; so likewise with Masticote and Ceruse, as you see cause. For light-greens, sap-greens, flour de Bise, tauny-green, needs nothing but steeped in water, which is best.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Of sundry Greens in Oyl.
For a deep and sad Green, as in the inmost leaves of trees, mingle Indico and Pinke. 
For a light Green, Pinke and Masticote : for a middle and Grasse green, Verdigreace and Pinke.
Remember ever to lay-on your Yellows, Blews, Reds, and Greens, upon a white ground, which giveth them their life.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Of Colours there be seven Species, to wit, White, Red, Yellow, Green, Blew, Brown, and Black. White and Black are the extremities, and the parents of all other Colours ; for Red is an equal mixture of White and Black, and so is Green : Yellow is two parts of White, and one of Red, &c.

Conceptual field(s)

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Quotation

CHAP. XVII. Of the seven Colours in General. [...] IV. The chief GREENS are these : Green Bice, Verdegriese, Verditure, Sapgreen. [...].

Les différents verts mentionnés dans cette partie sont ceux que l'on doit utiliser dans le cas de la peinture à l'eau (limning).

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

CHAP. II. Of the Colours in General.
I. The chief
Whites for painting in oyl are, White lead, Ceruse, and Spodium. [...] IV. The chief Greens are, Verdigriese, Terra vert, Verditer.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

The Colours to be used in Limning are termed thus,


Whites (Flake white / Serus)
Red (Carmine, / Indian Lake, / Red Lead, / Indian Red, / Burnt Ocur, &c.)
Yellow (Masticot, / Yellow ocur, / Eng. ocur, / Pinck.)
Greens (Sap Green, / Pinck and Bice, / Green Bice, / Terra Vert.)
Blews (Ultra Marine, / Dutch Bice, / Smalt, / Indigo.)
Browns (Gall Stone, / Mumme, / Cullins Earth, / Umber, / Rust.)
Blacks (Ivory black, / Sea-cole, / Lamp black, / Cherry Stone.)

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Pinck mixed with Bice, a good green.


Green) The Fairest Pinck is best, well ground and tempered with blew Bice, […].

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

A Dark Green.


For a
dark green for Trees mingle Verduter, Pinck, and Indigo, the deepest shadows of all in green are made with sap green and Indigo.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

The NAMES of the COLOURS Most useful and onely necessary for MINITURE.


(
Flake White)
Reds (Carmine / Indian Lake / Cynnabar LakeFlorence Lake / Cynnabar / Red Lead / Yellow Oker burnt)
Blews (Ultra Marine / Dutch Bice / Smalt / Indigo)
Yellows (Light Masticote / Deep Masticote /Yellow Oker / Roman Oker / Gall-stone / Light Pink / Dark Pink)
Greens (Green Pink / Green Bice / TerraVerte)
Browns (Collens Earth / Burnt Umber / Umber / Rust of Iron)
Blacks (Burnt Ivory / Sea Cole / Cherry-stone burnt / Verditer burnt)

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

SECT III. Of Colours.
There are simply six,
viz. White, Black, Red, Green, Yellow, and Blew ; to which we may add Browns, but they are compounded. […].

Chap. II,
Of Colours used in Limning : their names, and how to order them.
SECT. I.
Of the Names of Colours, and how every Colour is to be prepared ; whether Ground, Wash’d, or Steep’d.

BLACKS. /
Cherry-stones burnt. / Ivory burnt. / Lamp black.

WHITES. /
Ceruse. / White-Lead.

REDS. /
Red-Lead. / Lake.

GREENS. /
Bise. / Pink. / Sapgreen. / Cedar-green.

BLEWS. /
Indico. / Ultramarine. / Bise. / Smalt.

YELLOWS. / English
Oker. / Masticote.

BROWNS. /
Umber. / Spanish Brown. / Colen’s Earth.

These are the principal Colours used in Limning ; I have omitted many others but they are such that are not fitting for this Work, which I shall speak of when I come to teach how to
wash Maps and printed Pictures, for which use those Colours I have omitted are only useful.
Of the Colours here mentioned, useful in Limning, they are to be used three several ways,
viz. either Washed, Grownd, or Steeped.

The Colours to be only
Washed are these :
Bise. / Smalt.
Cedar. / Ultramarine.
Red-Lead. / Masticote.

To be
Steeped, only Sap-green.

The Colours to be
Washed and Grownd, are these :
Ceruse. / White-Lead. / Lake. / English Oker.
Pink. / Indico. / Umber. / Colens Earth.
Spanish
Brown. / Ivory, / and Cherry-stone. ) black.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Chap. I. Of the Names of your Colours, and how to Grind and order them.

The Names of the Colours in Oyl.
BLACKS /
Lamp-black. / Seacoal-black. / Ivory-black. / Charcoal-black. / Earth of Colen.
WHITES /
White-Lead.
GREENS. /
Verdigrease. / Terra vert. / Verditer.
BLEWS. /
Bise. / Indico. / Smalt. / Ultamarine.
REDS. /
Vermilion. / Red-Lead. / Lake. / India-Red. / Ornotto.
YELLOWS. /
Pink. / Masticote. / English Oker. / Orpiment. / Spruse Oker.
Spanish
Brown, Burnt Spruse, Umber.

These are the chief Colours that are used in Painting in Oyl, the most part of which are to be grownd very fine upon your Stone with a Muller, with Linseed-Oyl : some must be Burnt before they be Grownd ; others must be only temper’d upon the Pallat, and not grownd at all.
The Colours to be burnt are these :
Ivory, Spruse, Oker, and Umber.
The Colours that are not to be Grownd at all, but only tempered with Oyl upon your Pallat, are these :
Lamp-black, Verditer, Vermilion, Bise, Smalt, Masticote, Orpiment, Ultamarine.
All the rest are to be Grownd upon your Stone with Linseed-Oyl ; only White-Lead, when you are to use that for Linnen, you must grind it with Oyl of Walnuts, for Linseed-Oyl will make it turn yellow.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Chap. VI, Of Garments of several colours, and of their proper Colouring.
The next thing I shall speak of, shall be of
Drapery or Garments, and the true and proper manner of Colouring of them.
And
1. For a Red Garment.
For a light-red Garment, first dead-colour it with Vermilion, and when you would finish it, glaze it over with Lake, and heighten it with White.
For a Scarlet.
[…]
For a Crimson Velvet.
[…]
For a sad Red.
[…]
2.
For Green Garments.
The best Green for holding, is Bise and Pink, heighten it with Masticote, and deepen it with Indico and Pink.
For Green Velvet.
[…].
3.
For Blew Garments.
Take Indico and White, first lay the White in its due places, and then your mean colour, namely Indico and White mixed in their due places, then deepen it with Indico only, […].
4. For
Yellow Garments.
For a Yellow Garment, Masticote, yellow Oker, and Umber ; lay the dead colour of Masticote and White in the lightest places, Oker and White in the mean places, and Umber in the darkest places ; when it is dry glaze it with Pink. […].
5.
For Black Garments.
Let the dead colour be Lamp-black, and some Verdigrease ; when that is dry, go over it with Ivory-black and Verdigrease ; before you go over it the second time, heighten it with White.
6.
For Purple Garments.
Oyl Smalt, tempered with Lake and White-Lead, heighten it with White Lead.
7.
Orange Colour.
Red-Lead and Lake, lay the lightest parts of all with Red-Lead and White, the mean parts with Red-Lead alone, the deeper parts with Lake, if need require heighten it with White.
8.
Hair Colour.
Umber and White for the ground, Umber and Black for the deeper shadows, Umber and
English Oker for mean shadows, for heightning White with a little English Oker.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

In Landskip, variety of Colours are required ; I will therefore begin with those first.

Colours for the Skie.
For the Aiery skie that seems a great way off, take Oyl-Smalt or Bise, […] ; for a Red sky use Lake and White, […].

Colours for Trees.
For some use Lake, Umber, and White ; for others Charcoal and White, […].

Of several Greens in Landskip.
For a light Green use Pink and Masticote heightned with White.
For a sad Green, Indico and Pink heightned with Masticote.
You may make Greens of any degree whatsoever.
In Painting of Landskip I shall say nothing here, that which I have already said in the Sixth Chapter of the Book of
Limning being sufficient.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

1. How to make a Green colour of Copper-plates.
Take any shreds of Copper, and put distilled Vinegar to them, […], and it will be a good Green.
2.
To make a Green another way.
The best is
Cedar-green, but that is dear ; therefore you may take green Bise and steep it in Vinegar, […].
3.
Another Green.
Take the juyce of Rew, and a little Verdigrease, and a little Saffron, and grind them well together, and use it with a little Gum-water.
4.
For light Greens.
Sap-greens, Flower de Bise, or Tawny-green, these need no grinding, only steep’d in fair water, Verditer and Ceruss mixt with a little Copper-green, makes a good light colour.
5.
To shadow Greens.
Indico and Yellow-berries will do very well.
6.
Greens for Landskips and Rocks.
Temper your Green with white Pink, Bise, Masticote, Smalt, or Indico, or Ceruss.
Blew Verditer mixt with a few Vellow-Berries, make another Green.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

What Colours sets off best together.
1. Whites are very useful in all Colours, and sets off Black and Blew very well ; but Blacks are not much used, but upon necessary occasions in some things, as you judgement shall direct you.
2. Reds sets off well with Yellows.
3. Yellows sets off well with Reds, sad Blews Greens, Browns, Purples.
4. Blews sets off well with Reds, Yellows, Whites, Browns, and Blacks ; but Blews set not off well with Greens and Purples.
5. But Greens sets off well with Purples and Reds.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs