MILTON, John ( 1608-1674 )

MILTON, John ( 1608-1674 )

ISNI:0000000120993562 Getty:500284151

Quotation

A Connoisseur has this farther Advantage, He not only sees Beauties in Pictures, and Drawings, which to Common Eyes are Invisible ; He Learns by these to see such in Nature, in the Exquisite Forms, and Colours, the Fine Effects of Lights, Shadows, and Reflections which in Her is always to be found, and from whence he has a Pleasure which otherwise he could never have had, and which none with Untaught Eyes can Possibly discern : He has a constant Pleasure of This kind even in the most Common things, and the most Familiar to us, so that what People usually look upon with the utmost Indifference creates great Delight in his Mind. The Noblest Works of Rafaelle, the most Ravishing Musick of Hendell, the most Masterly Strokes of Milton, touch not People without Discernment : So the Beauties of the Works of the great Author of Nature are not seen but by Enlighten’d Eyes, and to These they appear far otherwise than before they were so ; as we hope to see every thing still nearer to its true Beauty, and Perfection in a Better State, when we shall see what our Eyes have not yet seen, nor our Hearts Conceiv’d.

Quotation

A Connoisseur has this farther Advantage, He not only sees Beauties in Pictures, and Drawings, which to Common Eyes are Invisible ; He Learns by these to see such in Nature, in the Exquisite Forms, and Colours, the Fine Effects of Lights, Shadows, and Reflections which in Her is always to be found, and from whence he has a Pleasure which otherwise he could never have had, and which none with Untaught Eyes can Possibly discern : He has a constant Pleasure of This kind even in the most Common things, and the most Familiar to us, so that what People usually look upon with the utmost Indifference creates great Delight in his Mind. The Noblest Works of Rafaelle, the most Ravishing Musick of Hendell, the most Masterly Strokes of Milton, touch not People without Discernment : So the Beauties of the Works of the great Author of Nature are not seen but by Enlighten’d Eyes, and to These they appear far otherwise than before they were so ; as we hope to see every thing still nearer to its true Beauty, and Perfection in a Better State, when we shall see what our Eyes have not yet seen, nor our Hearts Conceiv’d.