TASSO, Torquato ( 1544-1595 )

TASSO, Torquato ( 1544-1595 )

ISNI:000000012118517X Getty:500326795

Quotation

We will only observe further the different Idea given by the Painter, and the Poet [ndr : dans Poussin, Tancrède et Herminie et le Tasse, dans le passage de la Jérusalem céleste s’y rapportant]. A Reader of Tasso that thought less finely than Poussin would form in his Imagination a Picture, but not Such a one as This. He would see a Man of a less Lovely, and Beautiful Aspect, Pale, and all cut, and mangled, his Body, and Garments smear’d with Blood : He would see Erminia, not such a one as Poussin has made her ; and a thousand to one with a pair of Scissars in her hand, but certainly not with Tancred’s Sword : The two Amoretto’s would never enter into his Mind : Horses he would see, and let ‘em be the finest he had ever seen they would be less fine than These, and so of the rest. The Painter has made a finer Story than the Poet, tho’ his Readers were Equal to himself, but without all Comparison much finer than it can appear to the Generality of them. And he has moreover not only known how to make use of the Advantages This Art has over that of his Competitor, but in what it is Defective in the Comparison he has supply’d it with such Address that one cannot but rejoyce in the Defect which occasion’d such a Beautiful Expedient.

Quotation

‘Tis observable that tho’ Tasso says only Erminia cuts off her hair, Poussin was forc’d to explain what she cut it off withal, and he has given her her Lover’s Sword [ndr : Poussin, Herminie et Tancrède]. We don’t at all question but there will be those who will fancy they have here discover’d a notorious Absurdity in Poussin, it being impossible to cut Hair with a Sword ; but though it be, a Pair of Scissars instead of it, though much the sitter for the purpose, had spoil’d the Picture ; Painting, and Poetry equally disdain such low, and common things. This is a Lycence much of the same kind with that of Raffael in the Carton of the Draught of Fishes, where the Boat is by much too little for the Figures that are in it ; or with the Laacon, who is naked, whereas being a Priest in his Sacerdotal Office, he must have been suppos’d to have been clad : But we need not tell you, Sir [ndr : ce passage est la retranscription d’une lettre de Richardson, père et fils, à un « gentleman at Rotterdam »], why those Noble pieces of Painting, and Sculpture were so managed.

Quotation

We will only observe further the different Idea given by the Painter, and the Poet [ndr : dans Poussin, Tancrède et Herminie et le Tasse, dans le passage de la Jérusalem céleste s’y rapportant]. A Reader of Tasso that thought less finely than Poussin would form in his Imagination a Picture, but not Such a one as This. He would see a Man of a less Lovely, and Beautiful Aspect, Pale, and all cut, and mangled, his Body, and Garments smear’d with Blood : He would see Erminia, not such a one as Poussin has made her ; and a thousand to one with a pair of Scissars in her hand, but certainly not with Tancred’s Sword : The two Amoretto’s would never enter into his Mind : Horses he would see, and let ‘em be the finest he had ever seen they would be less fine than These, and so of the rest. The Painter has made a finer Story than the Poet, tho’ his Readers were Equal to himself, but without all Comparison much finer than it can appear to the Generality of them. And he has moreover not only known how to make use of the Advantages This Art has over that of his Competitor, but in what it is Defective in the Comparison he has supply’d it with such Address that one cannot but rejoyce in the Defect which occasion’d such a Beautiful Expedient.

Quotation

‘Tis observable that tho’ Tasso says only Erminia cuts off her hair, Poussin was forc’d to explain what she cut it off withal, and he has given her her Lover’s Sword [ndr : Poussin, Herminie et Tancrède]. We don’t at all question but there will be those who will fancy they have here discover’d a notorious Absurdity in Poussin, it being impossible to cut Hair with a Sword ; but though it be, a Pair of Scissars instead of it, though much the sitter for the purpose, had spoil’d the Picture ; Painting, and Poetry equally disdain such low, and common things. This is a Lycence much of the same kind with that of Raffael in the Carton of the Draught of Fishes, where the Boat is by much too little for the Figures that are in it ; or with the Laacon, who is naked, whereas being a Priest in his Sacerdotal Office, he must have been suppos’d to have been clad : But we need not tell you, Sir [ndr : ce passage est la retranscription d’une lettre de Richardson, père et fils, à un « gentleman at Rotterdam »], why those Noble pieces of Painting, and Sculpture were so managed.

Quotation

We will only observe further the different Idea given by the Painter, and the Poet [ndr : dans Poussin, Tancrède et Herminie et le Tasse, dans le passage de la Jérusalem céleste s’y rapportant]. A Reader of Tasso that thought less finely than Poussin would form in his Imagination a Picture, but not Such a one as This. He would see a Man of a less Lovely, and Beautiful Aspect, Pale, and all cut, and mangled, his Body, and Garments smear’d with Blood : He would see Erminia, not such a one as Poussin has made her ; and a thousand to one with a pair of Scissars in her hand, but certainly not with Tancred’s Sword : The two Amoretto’s would never enter into his Mind : Horses he would see, and let ‘em be the finest he had ever seen they would be less fine than These, and so of the rest. The Painter has made a finer Story than the Poet, tho’ his Readers were Equal to himself, but without all Comparison much finer than it can appear to the Generality of them. And he has moreover not only known how to make use of the Advantages This Art has over that of his Competitor, but in what it is Defective in the Comparison he has supply’d it with such Address that one cannot but rejoyce in the Defect which occasion’d such a Beautiful Expedient.