EER (n. f.)

EHRE (deu.) · FAME (eng.) · GLORIA (lat.) · HONNEUR (fra.) · HONOR (lat.) · HONORABLE ESTIMATION (eng.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
/ · EHRE (deu.) · FAME (eng.) · GLORIA (lat.) · HONOR (lat.) · HONORABLE ESTIMATION (eng.)

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LINKED QUOTATIONS

4 sources
7 quotations

Quotation

Doch overmids d’outste en beste Konstenaers de voornaemste kracht haeres wercks niet soo seer en stelden in ’t opghepronckte cieraet van schoone en kostelicke verwen als in een slecht effene maniere van wercken doe ter tijd ghebruyckelick, so plaght sich desen gantsch prijswaerdighen naer-yver ontrent d’eenvoudigheydt der Konste so gheluckighlick besigh te houden, dat de Konst-gherige Nae-yveraers de soete vermaeckelickheyd der konste (die uyt sulcken onbedwongen naevolghinghe ontstond) recht ghesmaeckt hebbende, met eene oock tot meerder neerstigheydt ontsteken wierden, niet alleen doer d’aenmerckinghe van het menighvuldighe gebruyck deser Konsten, maer oock door d’aenmerckinghe van d’overgroote eere die de Konstenaers allenthalven plaghten te genieten. Dese ghenoten eere was ’t smaeckelicke hengelaes, waer door haeren vlijt wierd opghescherpt om so gretighlick nae de Konst te snacken, dat sy haer selven met de daghelicksche Konst-oeffeningh van andere Meesters niet langher en verghenoegden, soeckende altijd door een vrymoedighe stoutvaerdigheyd yet niews aen te vanghen.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Yet while the oldest and best Artists did not place the main power of their work as much in the affected jewel of beautiful and expensive paints as in a bad plain manner of working which was common at that time, consequently this truly praiseworthy envy tends to happily busy itself with the simplicity of Art, that the Art-coveting Zealots – having truly tasted the sweet pleasure of art (which came forth from such unrestrained imitation), are immediately kindled to more diligence, not only out of consideration of the manifold application of these Arts, but also out of consideration of the major honor that Artists tend to enjoy everywhere. The experience of this honor was the tasty bait, because of which their diligence was sharpened to long eagerly after the Art in such a way, that they did no longer contend themselves with the daily Art-practice of other Masters, always searching to start something new because of a confident boldness.

In the introduction to the second book, Junius discusses the competition amongst the earliest painters. He explains how a desire for honor (‘eer’) stimulated the audacity (‘stoutmoedigheid’) of artists in trying to surpass each other. As such, ‘eer’ is used here in the sense of fame, the result of successful artistic competition. [MO]

term translated by HONOR in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 50
term translated by HONORABLE ESTIMATION in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 87-88

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
SPECTATEUR → marché de l'art

Quotation

Alhoewel nu d’oude Konstenaers buyten twijfel door de hitte haeres volgh-lusts en door d’onverdraeghelicke onwederstaenlicke prickelen des naer-yvers krachtighlick tot een gantsch ernstighe oeffeninghe deser Konsten aengedreven wierden, nochtans moghen wy niet dencken dat dese Konsten aleen door d’onderlinghe Aemulatio der Konstenaeren ghevoordert sijn gheweest, maer wy houden ’t daer voor dat den grooten naem van vele welsprekende mannen de wackere gheesten der Konstenaeren met eenen oock opgheweckt heeft om yet wat te verrichten ’t welck dierghelijcke eere verdienen mocht.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Although the old Artists were without a doubt driven forcefully by the heat of their desire to imitate and by the unbearable irresistible incentives of envy towards serious practice of these Arts, still we should not think that these Arts have only advanced through the mutual Emulation of Artists, but we insist that the great name of many eloquent men have simultaneously incited the alert minds of Artists to do something which might deserve such an honor.

term translated by GLORIA in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 67
term translated by FAME in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 116-117

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
SPECTATEUR → marché de l'art

Quotation

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] As the Athenians thought to have great reason to honour and serve their patron god Minerva above all the other Gods and Godesses, as such they thought it well to erect a beautiful statue for her on an elevated base; they commissioned two of the very best Artists, Alcamenes and Phidias¸to do this; and they meanwhile let it be known that the statue that was to be judged the best in everyone’s judgement, would be paid for with a nice sum of money, so the Artists eagerly went to work, driven by the hope for great profit and greater honour that appeared would follow from it. Alcamenes was completely inexperienced in the Mathematical Arts, and thought that he had acquitted himself farily well, when his statue appeared beautiful to those who were standing close. Phidias on the other hand had decided, according to the knowledge that he had from the Geometrical and the Optical sciences, that the whole appearance of the statue would change following the situation of the envisioned height, (…) as such saw the tides change within a matter of hours; because as the sweetness that one could perceive up close in the lovely statue of Alcamenes, disappeared because of the height and changed into a certain hardness, as such the crooked deformity of Phidias’ statue was softened miraculously by the forshorthening of the heightened location, and the difference in craftsmanship between the two artists was so remarkably large, that the one received the deserved praise, the other, on the other hand, was brought to shame with his work, see […]

In recounting the story of the competition between Alcamenes and Phidias for the commission of a statue of Minerva, Junius introduces the term profit (winst) to describe the motivation of both artist to win the competition, besides the great honour (eer) that would be bestowed upon them. In the Dutch edition, JUnius is much more explicit than in the English and Latin edition in his analysis of why Phidias’ sculpture was more successful in the end. He explains and identifies the foreshortening as the decisive factor. [MO]

term translated by / in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 138 in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 232-233
term translated by / in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p. 138 in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p. 232-233

Conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → marché de l'art

Quotation

Insonderheyt heeft dit seer sterck sijnen voortganck beginnen te nemen, soo wanneer als het gelt, eer, ende rijcke belooningh sijn kracht omtrent de Konstenaers heeft beginnen te Oeffenen, want de Gout-sucht heeft al van outs her den toom van Deught en Ondeught in sijn gewelt gehad; {Konsten worden voornamelijck door belooningh op gequeeckt.}

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] This especially started to take its shape stronger when money, honour and a rich reward started to practise its power on the Artists, because the gold fever has always had the limits of Virtue and Vice in its power; {The arts are mainly cultivated through reward.}

Conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → marché de l'art

Quotation

Nu soo staet inde twede tijt te letten op de middelen diemen moet aenwenden, om eenen heerlijcken ende grooten naem te bekomen: {2. Tijt om een grooten naem te bekomen.} Door de Eere (seght Iunius) wert de Schilder-Konst als door ’t rechte Lock-aes aengeset. Soo is oock de hope van een onsterffelijcken naem te bekomen, het eenigh oogh-merck der oude Vermaerde Konstenaers geweest; wetende dat indien sy dien konden bereycken, het haer aen geen winste ontbreecken soude. Men kan geen wegh, die daer op uytloopt nader practiseeren, dan te arbeyden om sich Universeel in de Konst te maecken, en gelijckmen seyt over al t’huys te zijn; {Datmen moet soeken algemeen in de Konst te zijn.} invoegen men alle ende een yegelijck kome te voldoen. Hoe menighmael sietmen door gebreck van dese algemeenheyt dat fraye Meesters hare Tafereelen bederven met yets daer by te maecken, op welcke sy haer niet en verstaen; als by Exempel een Beeldt-Schilder dat hy Lantschappen by sijn Historyen maeckt die niet en Deugen, of Gebouwen en anders tegen de order-maten ende perspectijf regeles daer by ordineert, ende dierghelijcke, als de verstandige genogh sal vatten: In alle welcke misslagen een Schilder niet en sal vervallen, by aldien hy sich op de alghemeene wetenschappen verstaet.
Men soude hier tegen konnen inbrengen, datter Remedien zijn om in desen geholpen te werden, {Tegenwerpingh van sommige.} ende datmen, gelijck het veel geschiet, sijne stucken door andere kan laten op maecken, als by voorbeelt, dat een Beelde-Schilder sijne verschieten van een Landtschap-Schilder laet maecken, of de Gebouwen van een die in de Architecture ende perspectijf verstaet, ende soo voort: Waerom een Landtschap-Schilder sijn stucken door een Beeldenaer kan laten stoffeeren, gelijckmen dat soo noemt: Invoegen datter dickwils twee, dry, à vier Meesters aen een Tafereel geschildert hebben. Hier omtrent heeft de Ervarentheyt geleert, dat de Beelden in soodanige stucken dickwils worden ingelapt even offer uyt de Lucht ingevallen waren, of immers daer in niet en hoorden. {Haer misslagh ontdeckt.} Want menighmael en wert van de Stoffeerders het voornemen vanden Meester noch de verkiesinghe van het Dagh-licht, noch de behoorlijcke wijckinge der gronden, de Perspectijf, Ja den ganschen aert van ’t Landschap niet verstaen; veel min dan datse het in het toe-passen harer Beelden in acht souden nemen: invoegen dat sy gantsch onge-aerde Beelden van eenen schoonen dag in een sommer Landtschap komen te maecken, en diergelijcke misslagen meer, die tegen de waerheyt der nature, en regelen van de Konst strijden. ‘k Hebbbe veelmael geobserveert, dat de Beeleen [sic, ndr.] ende Beesten, die vanden Lantschap-Schilder selfs daer in gemaeckt waren, die (hoe slecht sy oock mogten geteykent wesen) nochtans beter uyt eenen aert na het Landtschap geplaetst, en Geschildert waren, dan andere die al van een goet Meester daer waren by-geflanst. {Door ervarentheyt van veel voorvallen wederleyt.}

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] In the second period it is important to pay attention to the means that one should apply to obtain a glorious and great name: {2. Period to obtain a great name.} The Art of Painting (says Junius) is stimulated by honor as if by a real bate. As such the hope of obtaining an immortal name, has been the only objective of the old Famous Artists; knowing that if they could reach it, they would not be lacking any profit. There is no road to follow more closely to arriver there, than to make oneself Universal in the Art, and to say to be at home anywhere; {That one should try to be general in the Art.} as such one will learn to do everything. How often one sees that through the lack of this generality good Masters spoil their Paintings by adding something to it, which they do not master; As if, for example, a Painter of Figures makes Landscapes for his Histories that are not good, or composes Buildings and such against the proportional sizes and rules of perspective to it, and such, which the wise will readily understand: A Painter would not fall into these mistakes, if he understands the general sciences of all this. One could contradict this [by saying] that there are remedies to assist in this, {The counterargument of some.} and that one, as happens often, can have his pieces be drawn up by others, like for example, that a Painter of Figures has his perspectives drawn up by a Landscape Painter, or the Buildings by someone who understands Architecture and Perspective, et cetera: This is why a Landscape Painter can have his pieces be filled in by a Figure painter, as one calls it: As such there are often two, three or four Masters who have worked on a Painting. In this regard the experience has taught us, that the Figures in such works are often thrown in as if they had fallen in from the sky, or did not belong there. {Their mistake discovered.} Because oftentimes the idea of the Master nor the selection of the Day-light nor the appropriate deviation of the ground, the Perspective, yes the whole nature of the Landscape is not understood by those who fill in the picture; even less so that they would take it into consideration in their Figures: as such they arrive at making rather inappropriate Figures of a beautiful day for a gloomy Landscape and more of such mistakes, which strive against the truth of nature and the rules of the Art. I have often seen that Figures and Animals that had been made by the Landscape Painter himself, (however bad they may have been drawn) had been placed and painted much better in character with the Landscape than others that had been thrown in it by a good Master. {Contradicted by the experience of many cases.}

Conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → jugement

Quotation

Het stond ook die verstandige Menschkundigers ligt te denken, dat terwijl de slegte Meestertjes en Knoyers de onberoerlijkheyd en gebreklijkheyd harer beelden onder d’optoysels der kleedingen, en rijckgeployde drapperyen quamen te verbergen, en ’t oog des gemeenen volx beguichelden, sy met haar wel verstane Beelden, die sonder eenige bewimpeling als aan de naakte waarheyd konden getoest werden, de grootste eer by de Konstkenders en Menschkundige beschouwers souden inleggen: en datse by gevolg alle de andere werken van die en de volgende tijden, soo doende best verduuren konden.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] It was also easy for those wise experts of Anatomy to think that, while the bad little masters and botchers tended to hide the lack of movement and flaws of their figures under the adornment of clothing and richly pleated drapery, and mislead the eye of the common people, they would receive the greatest honour from the Connoisseurs and spectators of the human body, with their well conceived Figures, who could be tested to the naked truth without any disguise: and that they would therefore be able to survive the other works from that and later times.

Conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → jugement

Quotation

Tien jaar om het verstand te rypen, en den geest op te wekken, is twee en twintig. Tien jaar om het leeven te onderzoeken en t’ordineeren, is twee en dertig; dan noch tien om uit te munten in ’t algemeen, zo in Theorie als Practyk, maakt zaamen twee en veertig, die nu vyftig, en meer bereiken kan, zyn de jaaren om een doorlugtigen naam, eer en geld te verkrygen. Zo is ’t dat ik de koers gereekent, of liever verdeeld heb, van een braaf Schilder, of Konstenaars leeven. Doch den Heemel beschikt het naar zyn welgevallen, helpt den eenen wat vroeg, en den anderen wat laater, absque ingenio, labor inutilis, dat is, zonder bequaamheid is ’t vergeefs gearbeid. Dierhalven zo leert ons de ervarentheid, dat de alderbeste middelen om in de Teekenkonst te vorderen is, wanneer men jong zynde, een bequaame geest, goed onderwys, en een volstandige naarstigheid heeft: waar van de laatste, de moeielykste dingen, gemakkelijk doet worden.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Ten years to ripen the mind and incite the spirit, makes twenty-two. Ten years to investigate the life and to compose, makes thirty-two; then another ten to excel in general, both in Theory and Practice, makes forty-two, he who can reach fifty, which are the years to obtain an illustrious name, honour and money. This is how I count, or rather divide, the course of the life of a good Painter or Artist. Yet the Heaven determines it to its own desire, helps one [ndr: artist] a bit early, the other somewhat later, absque ingenio, labor inutilis, that is: without aptitude labour is in vain. Therefore the experience teaches us, that the best means to advance in the Art of Drawing is to have an adequate spirit, good instruction and enduring diligence: the latter makes the hardest things easy.

term translated by EHRE
term translated by /

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
SPECTATEUR → marché de l'art