PAINTING IN OIL (n.)

PEINTURE À L’HUILE (fra.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
PEINTURE À L’HUILE (fra.)
HURLEY, Cecilia, « William Salmon et la “Polygraphice” : la théorie de l’art en Angleterre avant Jonathan Richardson », dans HECK, Michèle-Caroline (éd.), L’histoire de l’histoire de l’art septentrional au XVIIe siècle, Actes des journées d'étude de Lille et de Bruxelles, Turnhout, Brepols, 2010, p. 187-207.

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4 quotations

Quotation

Of painting in Oyle.
Here you must provide one thing more then you did before : that is, a Pallet (so called by Artists) whereupon you must put a small quantitie of every such colour you are to use, the forme whereof followeth [ndr : présence d’un dessin de palette au dessous de ce paragraphe].

The colours to be used, are altogether such dry substances as I mentioned formerly : as Oker, Vermilion red lead, Umber, Spanish browne, Lam-blacke, Gambugice, Masticot, Orpment, Ceruse, or Spanish white, blew and greene Bise, Verdigrease, and a multitude of such like, which may be had at the Rose in
Cornehill, London.
Your colours must be ground all very finely, and tempered with Linseed oyle ; and to preserve them, put them in little earthen pans, and put water upon them, and cover them, that the dust come not at them : thus they may be kept a great while, and from thence you may take them as your use doth require.
There are divers colours which without the admixture of another colour, will not be dry a great while ; as Lake, Verdigrease, Lam-blacke : with such you must temper a little Umber or red lead.
Divers Painters there are, that having haste of worke, doe use to temper their colour with one part of fatte oyle, and two of common Linseed oyle, and by this meanes they make the colours dry the sonner : this fat oyle is onely Linseed oyle exposed to the weather, and so it becommeth thicker : yea sometimes you shall see it so thicke, that you may cut it almost like Butter : it may bee made likewise by boyling of it a little while, but the former is the best. As for the tempering of your colours, I can prescribe no surer way then experience with diligent observation.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la peinture

Quotation

{Of Painting in Oyle.} Painting in Oyle is done, I confess, with greater judgment, and is generally of more esteem, then working in water colours; but then it is more Mechanique, and will rob you of overmuch time from your more excellent studies, it being sometime a fortnight, or a month ere you can finish an ordinary piece. I have known Michael Janss of Delf in Holland, the most excellent Painter of all the Low-Countries, to have been (at times), a whole half year about a picture, yet in the end to have blurred it out (as it is his manner) for some small disresemblance, either in the eye or mouth ; so curious is the workmanship to do it well : beside, oyle, nor oyle colours, if they drop upon apparel, will not out ; when water colours will with the least washing.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la peinture

Quotation

Liber Tertius.
Of Painting, Washing, Colouring, Dying and Varnishing.

Containing the description and use of all the chief Instruments & materials ; the way and manner of working, together with the beginning, progress and end thereof.
[...].
 
CHAP. I. Of Painting in Oyl, & the Materials thereof.
I. Painting in Oyl is nothing but the work or Art of Limning performed with colours made up or mixed with oyl.
II. The materials of Painting are chiefly seven, 1.
The Easel, 2. The Pallet, 3. The Straining frame, 4. The Primed cloath, 5. Pensils, 6. The Stay, 7. Colours.
III.
The Easel is a frame made of wood (much like a ladder) with sides flat, and full of holes, to put in two pins to set your work upon higher or lower at pleasure ; something broader at bottom than at the top ; on the backside whereof is a stay, by which you may set the Easel more upright or floping.
IV. The Pallet is a thin piece of wood, (Peartree or Walnut) a foot long, and about ten Inches broad, almost like an Egg, at the narrowest end of which is made an hole, to put in the thumb of the left hand, near to which is cut a notch, that so you may hold the pallet in your hand. Its use is to hold and temper the Colours upon.
V. The Streining frame is made of wood, to which with nails is fastned, the primed cloath, which is to be painted upon.
These ought to be of several sizes according to the bigness of the cloath.
VI. The Primed cloath is that which is to be painted upon ; and is thus prepared.
[...].

VII. Pensils are of all bignesses, from a pin to the bigness of a finder, called by several names, as Ducks quill fitched and pointed ; goose quill fitched and pointed, Swans quill fitched and pointed ; Jewelling pensils, and bristle Pensils : some in quils, some in tinn cases, and some in sticks.
VIII. The Stay or Mol-stick, is a Brazil stick (or the like) of a yard-long ; having at the one end thereof, a little ball of Cotton, fixed hard in a piece of leather, of the bigness of a chestnut ; which when you are at work you must hold in your left hand ; and laying the end which hath the leather ball upon the cloath or frame, you may rest your right arm upon it, whilst you are at work.
IX. The Colours are in number seven (
ut supra) to wit White, Black, Red, Green, Yellow, Blew, and Brown.
Of which some may be tempred on the pallet at first ; some must be ground, and then tempred ; and other some must be burnt, ground, and lastly tempred.
[...].

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la peinture
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → outils

Quotation

Painting in Oyl is of most esteem of any other Painting, and indeed it requireth the greatest judgment in the performance, of any other kind of Painting. I shall (according to the weakness of my ability) deliver unto you such Rules and directions, as being well minded and practised, may in a short time make you a good proficient therein : Presupposing you have read the three foregoing Books, especially the First and Third, and that you understand Draught of any kind, and also the nature (if not the manner of working with) Water-colours, yet at least have read the Rules there delivered concerning the use of them, you may fall to practice the Painting in Oyl ;

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la peinture