BROWN (n.)

BRAUN (deu.) · BRUIN (nld.) · BRUN (fra.) · BRUNO (ita.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
BRUIN (nld.)

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

7 sources
14 quotations

Quotation

A Browne.
Browne is called in high Dutch
Braun of the Netherlands Bruyn, in Frence Coleur brune, in Italian Bruno, in Greeke ὄρφνινονἢαἰθοψ from colour of the Æthiopians, […] and indeed it is taken properly for that duskie rednesse that appeareth in the morning either before the Sun-rising, or after the same set.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Browne Colour.
Take good browne, and grinde it with Gumme water : his false colour is made with two parts browne, and a third part white lead, sad it with the same browne.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

A russet or sad Browne.
This colour is made by compounding a little white, with a good quantity of red.

A browne Blew.
Take two parts of Indie Baudias, and a third of ceruse and temper them with gumme water.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Of Limning in Water-Colours
The True Order and Names of Colours, the means to prepare them for the Pensill and to clense them from their corrupt mixtures, wherewith they are Sophisticate.
We name them
Seaven (though in truth the first and last White and Black are no Colours ; but Elements.) [...] Browns,
Umber,
Spanish-brown
Terra lemnia or
Cullins earth

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Of Colours there be seven Species, to wit, White, Red, Yellow, Green, Blew, Brown, and Black. White and Black are the extremities, and the parents of all other Colours ; for Red is an equal mixture of White and Black, and so is Green : Yellow is two parts of White, and one of Red, &c.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

An Exposition of Colours.
Abram colour,
i.e. brown
Auburne or Abborne,
i.e. brown or brown-black.
Cole black.
Sable black.
Velvet black.
Pitchy black.
Blanket colour,
i. e. a light watchet.
Venice blew,
i. e. a light blew.
Lincolne blew.
Coventry blew.
A Prince blew.
Crimson,
i. e. Scarlet.
Cumatical colour,
i. e. blew.
Flesh colour, a certain mixture of red white.
Gangran colour,
i. e. divers colours together, as in a Mallards, or Pigeons neck.
Sabell colour,
i. e. flame colour.
Incardine, or flesh colour.
Peacocke colour,
i. e. changeable blew, or red blew. 
Patise, or a kinde of red or Arsenick colour.
Plumbet colour,
i. e. like little Speks of gray clouds in a fair day. 
Puke colour,
i. e. between russet and black.
Purpurine, or Purple colour ; of which read
Matth. 27.2. A colour much used heretofore, by the Tyrians ; but now it is not to be had.
Ried colour, or Diversified.
Scarlet,
i. e. crimson, or stammel.
Shammy colour, a smoakie, or rain colour, which is a kind of yellow ; as you may see upon whited walls or in a Chymny.
Stammel,
i. e. Scarlet, as before.
Lyon Tawny.
Turkie colour,
i. e. Venice blew, or as others will have it, red.
Milke white.
Paper white.
Snow white. 
Bastard yellow.
Bright yellow.
Dark yellow.


Of the Names of Colours, read more in
Aul. Gel. Noct. Attic.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

CHAP. XVII. Of the seven Colours in General. [...] VII. The chiefest BROWNS are Umber, Spanish-brown, Colens Earth. [...].

Les différents marrons mentionnés dans cette partie sont ceux que l'on doit utiliser dans le cas de la peinture à l'eau (limning).

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

CHAP. II. Of the Colours in General.
I. The chief
Whites for painting in oyl are, White lead, Ceruse, and Spodium. [...] VII. The chief Browns are, Spanish brown, Burnt Spruce, Umber.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

The Colours to be used in Limning are termed thus,


Whites (Flake white / Serus)
Red (Carmine, / Indian Lake, / Red Lead, / Indian Red, / Burnt Ocur, &c.)
Yellow (Masticot, / Yellow ocur, / Eng. ocur, / Pinck.)
Greens (Sap Green, / Pinck and Bice, / Green Bice, / Terra Vert.)
Blews (Ultra Marine, / Dutch Bice, / Smalt, / Indigo.)
Browns (Gall Stone, / Mumme, / Cullins Earth, / Umber, / Rust.)
Blacks (Ivory black, / Sea-cole, / Lamp black, / Cherry Stone.)

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

The NAMES of the COLOURS Most useful and onely necessary for MINITURE.


(
Flake White)
Reds (Carmine / Indian Lake / Cynnabar LakeFlorence Lake / Cynnabar / Red Lead / Yellow Oker burnt)
Blews (Ultra Marine / Dutch Bice / Smalt / Indigo)
Yellows (Light Masticote / Deep Masticote /Yellow Oker / Roman Oker / Gall-stone / Light Pink / Dark Pink)
Greens (Green Pink / Green Bice / TerraVerte)
Browns (Collens Earth / Burnt Umber / Umber / Rust of Iron)
Blacks (Burnt Ivory / Sea Cole / Cherry-stone burnt / Verditer burnt)

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

SECT III. Of Colours.
There are simply six,
viz. White, Black, Red, Green, Yellow, and Blew ; to which we may add Browns, but they are compounded. […].

Chap. II,
Of Colours used in Limning : their names, and how to order them.
SECT. I.
Of the Names of Colours, and how every Colour is to be prepared ; whether Ground, Wash’d, or Steep’d.

BLACKS. /
Cherry-stones burnt. / Ivory burnt. / Lamp black.

WHITES. /
Ceruse. / White-Lead.

REDS. /
Red-Lead. / Lake.

GREENS. /
Bise. / Pink. / Sapgreen. / Cedar-green.

BLEWS. /
Indico. / Ultramarine. / Bise. / Smalt.

YELLOWS. / English
Oker. / Masticote.

BROWNS. /
Umber. / Spanish Brown. / Colen’s Earth.

These are the principal Colours used in Limning ; I have omitted many others but they are such that are not fitting for this Work, which I shall speak of when I come to teach how to
wash Maps and printed Pictures, for which use those Colours I have omitted are only useful.
Of the Colours here mentioned, useful in Limning, they are to be used three several ways,
viz. either Washed, Grownd, or Steeped.

The Colours to be only
Washed are these :
Bise. / Smalt.
Cedar. / Ultramarine.
Red-Lead. / Masticote.

To be
Steeped, only Sap-green.

The Colours to be
Washed and Grownd, are these :
Ceruse. / White-Lead. / Lake. / English Oker.
Pink. / Indico. / Umber. / Colens Earth.
Spanish
Brown. / Ivory, / and Cherry-stone. ) black.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Chap. I. Of the Names of your Colours, and how to Grind and order them.

The Names of the Colours in Oyl.
BLACKS /
Lamp-black. / Seacoal-black. / Ivory-black. / Charcoal-black. / Earth of Colen.
WHITES /
White-Lead.
GREENS. /
Verdigrease. / Terra vert. / Verditer.
BLEWS. /
Bise. / Indico. / Smalt. / Ultamarine.
REDS. /
Vermilion. / Red-Lead. / Lake. / India-Red. / Ornotto.
YELLOWS. /
Pink. / Masticote. / English Oker. / Orpiment. / Spruse Oker.
Spanish
Brown, Burnt Spruse, Umber.

These are the chief Colours that are used in Painting in Oyl, the most part of which are to be grownd very fine upon your Stone with a Muller, with Linseed-Oyl : some must be Burnt before they be Grownd ; others must be only temper’d upon the Pallat, and not grownd at all.
The Colours to be burnt are these :
Ivory, Spruse, Oker, and Umber.
The Colours that are not to be Grownd at all, but only tempered with Oyl upon your Pallat, are these :
Lamp-black, Verditer, Vermilion, Bise, Smalt, Masticote, Orpiment, Ultamarine.
All the rest are to be Grownd upon your Stone with Linseed-Oyl ; only White-Lead, when you are to use that for Linnen, you must grind it with Oyl of Walnuts, for Linseed-Oyl will make it turn yellow.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

9. To make a Brown.
Take Ceruss, Red-Lead,
English-Oker, and Pink.
10. Spanish Brown.
It’s a dirty colour, yet of great use if you burn it till it be red hot ; but if you would colour any hare, horse, or dog, or the like, you must not burn it, but to shadow Vermilion, or to lay upon any dark ground behind a Picture, or to shadow Berries in the darkest places, or to colour any wooden Poste, Wainscot, bodies of Trees, or any thing else of Wood, or any dark ground on a Picture.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

What Colours sets off best together.
1. Whites are very useful in all Colours, and sets off Black and Blew very well ; but Blacks are not much used, but upon necessary occasions in some things, as you judgement shall direct you.
2. Reds sets off well with Yellows.
3. Yellows sets off well with Reds, sad Blews Greens, Browns, Purples.
4. Blews sets off well with Reds, Yellows, Whites, Browns, and Blacks ; but Blews set not off well with Greens and Purples.
5. But Greens sets off well with Purples and Reds.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs