DESIGNER (n.)

DESSINATEUR (fra.) · TEKENAAR (nld.) · ZEICHNER (deu.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
DESSINATEUR (fra.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
DESSINATEUR (fra.)

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LINKED QUOTATIONS

3 sources
3 quotations

Quotation

Perino del Vaga came to Rome in Raphael’s Time, and grew excellent by studying his and Michael Angelo’s Works ; he was a bold and strong Designer, having understood the Muscles in Naked Bodies as well as any of his time ; he had a particular Talent for Grottesk ; of which kind there are many Pieces of his in Rome ; but his chief Works are at Genova in the Pallace of Principe Doria ; he was a very universal Painter both in Fresco, Oyl and Distemper, and first taught the true working of Grottesks and Stucco Work.
           
Michael Angelo Buonaroti was the greatest Designer that ever was, having studied Naked Bodies with great Care ; but he aiming always at showing the most difficult things of the Art, in the Contorsions of Members, and Convulsions of the Muscles, Contractions of the Nerves, &c. His Painting is not so agreeable, though much more profound and difficult than any other ; his Manner was Fierce, and almost Savage, having nothing of the Graces of Raphael, whose Naked Figures are dilicate and tender, and more like Flesh and Blood, whereas Michael Angelo doth not distinguish the Sexes nor the Ages so well, but makes all alike Musculous and Strong ; and who sees one Naked Figure of his doing, may reckon he has seen them all ; his Colouring is nothing near so Natural as Raphael’s, and in a word, for all Vasari commends him above the Skies, he was a better Sculptor than a Painter : One may of Raphael and of him, that their Characters were opposite, and both great Designers ; the one endeavouring to show the Difficulties of the Art, and the other aiming at Easiness ; in which, perhaps, there is as much Difficulty.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

The Painters of the Roman School were the Best Designers, and had more of the Antique Taste in their Works than any of the Others, but generally they were not good Colourists ; Those of Florence were good Designers, and had a Kind of Greatness, but ‘twas not Antique. The Venetian, and Lombard Schools had Excellent Colourists, and a certain Grace but entirely Modern, especially those of Venice ; but their Drawing was generally Incorrect, and their Knowledge in History, and the Antique very little :

École florentine
École romaine

term translated by DESSINATEUR in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 172-173.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

So neither are there two Men, nor two Faces, no, not two Eyes, Foreheads, Noses, or any other Features : Nay farther, there is not two Leaves, tho’ of the same Species, perfectly alike.
A Designer therefore must consider, when he draws after Nature, that his Business is to describe That very Form, as distinguish’d from every other Form in the Universe.
In order to give this Just Representation of Nature […] I say in order to follow Nature exactly, a Man must be well acquainted with Nature, and have a reasonable Knowledge of Geometry, Proportion, (which must be varied according to the Sex, Age, and Quality of the Person) Anatomy, Osteology, and Perspective. I will add to these an Acquaintance with the Works of the best Painters, and Sculptors, Ancient, and Modern : For ‘tis a certain Maxim, No Man sees what things Are, that knows not what they Ought to be.
That this Maxim is true, will appear by an Academy Figure drawn by one ignorant in the Structure, and knitting of the Bones, and Anatomy, compar’d with another who understands these throughly :

term translated by DESSINATEUR in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 117-118.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
L’ARTISTE → apprentissage
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai