LELIJK (adj.)

HÄSSLICH (deu.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
DEFORMIS (lat.) · HARD-FAVOURED (eng.)
Anciens (les)
Modernes (Les)

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

2 sources
4 quotations

Quotation

Wanneer de Schilders eenighe schoone ende bevallighe tronien, daer nochtans ’t eene of ’t andere ghebreck in ghespeurt wordt bestaen te Contrefeyten seght Plutarchus {In Cimonis vita.}, wy plaghten dan op deselvighe te versoecken, datse die mismaeckte hardigheyd niet t’eenemael en souden voorby gaen, noch oock al te besighlick uytdrucken, overmids het seker is dat het Beeld dat of soo ghehandelt wesende, ofte omghelijck, ofte leelick schijnen sal.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] When the Painters are needed to portray some beautiful and lovely faces, in which one then finds some sort of flaw, says Plutarchus {…}, we then tend to request for this, that they do not neglect that deformed hardness immediately, but neither express it too readily, since it is certain that the Image that is being made that way, would appear either uneven [NDR: not resembling the sitter] or ugly.

The verb conterfeyten (to portray) is used to describe the specific act of portraying someone’s face. Junius cites Plutarchus, who stated that one should not neglect flaws in the face, nor should these elements be emphasized. If the flaws are too clearly present, the image would be perceived as not resembling the sitter (ongelijk) or ugly (lelijk). [MO]

term translated by DEFORMIS in JUNIUS, Franciscus, De pictura veterum libri tres, Amsterdam, Joannes Blaeu, 1637., p.143
term translated by HARD-FAVOURED in JUNIUS, Franciscus, The Painting of the Ancients, in Three Bookes : declaring by Historicall Observations and Examples, the Beginning, Progresse, and Consummation of that most Noble Art. And how those Ancient Artificers attained to their still so much admired Excellencie. Written first in latine by Franciscus Junius, F. F. And now by him englished, with some Additions and Alterations, trad. par JUNIUS, Franciscus, London, Richard Hodgkinsonne, 1638., p.239

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

Overmids dan ieder een bekent staet dat de stucken die schaeckberds-wijse met groove ende verscheyden verwighe placken bekladt sijn, niet t’onrechte voor gantsch leelick ende verfoeyelick worden gheouden, soo en kanmen daer uyt lichtelick afnemen, dat het harde bruyn sich teghen het klaere licht niet en behoort schielick aen te stooten. ’t Bruyne moet gantsch soetelick in ’t graeuwe verwrocht worden, om te beter van het graeuwe tot het lichte te komen. De Schilderyen die het swarte en ’t witte losselick aen een klampen, schijnen van verde eenen maermer-steen ofte een schaeck-berd te ghelijcken; dies moetmen dese hardigheyd door ’t tusschen-komen van half-verwighe graeuwen soeken te versachten, ten eynde dat twee teghenstrijdighe verwen, door een konstighe verdrijvinghe allenghskens verflaeuwende in malckander moghten verlooren loopen en versmelten.

[Suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] As everyone knows that het pieces that are daubed chessboard-wise with coarse and different coloured patches, are not without reason considered very ugly and abominable, as such one can easily take from this that the hard brown should not suddenly bump into the clear light. The Brown should be worked into the gray rather gently, to arrive better from the gray to the light. The Paintings that loosely clasp the black and the white together, look like a plate of marble or a chessboard from afar; therefor one should try to soften this hardness by adding half-colour grays, in order that two contrasting colours, may, gradually fading, dissolve and melt into eachother through an artful diminiution.

This section does not exist in the Latin and English edition. [MO]

verfoeilijk

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

Van de Schoonheyd en Bevalligheyd der Mensch-beelden, en waar in die bestaat.
Het sal buyten alle twijffel aan de Schilderkonst ten hoogsten voordeeligh zijn, altijt de meeste Schoonheyd en volmaaktheyd der dingen die verbeeld werden, te bevorderen: Want gelijk ons de geschape dingen best behagen, welke schoon en volkomen zijn, soo blijft ‘er geen reden over, waarom de nageboodste dingen niet de selve bevalligheyd aan het oogh van den Beschouwer souden voortbrengen. En alhoewelmen in de Tafereelen veel dingen schoon kan noemen, welke in ’t natuurlijk Leven leelijk en verfoeyelijk, ja mismaakt zijn, soo moetmen sulx alleen aan de verstandige en uytvoerige navolgingh van de veel vermogende Schilderkonst opdragen, en die ook veel eer
fray en konstig dan Schoon noemen.

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Of the Beauty and Gracefulness of Human figures, and of what it consists. Without any doubt it is most beneficial to the Art of Painting, to always advance the highest Beauty and perfection of the things that are depicted: Because like those created things please us most, which are beautiful and perfect, as such there is no reason left, why the imitated things should not offer the same gracefulness to the eye of the Spectator. And although one can call many things beautiful in the Paintings, that are ugly and abominable in the natural Life, yes deformed, as such one should only entrust this to the wise and elaborate imitation of the very powerful Art of Painting, and also rather call it fine and artful than beautiful.

verfoeilijk
schoon · konstig · fray

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection

Quotation

Vele onder d Oude en Jonge hebben gemeent dat het niet wel uyt te spreken noch te bepalen was, wat het eygentlijk is, dat wy Schoon noemen; en dat het oversulx niet net kan aangewesen werden, door welcke Waarnemingen, die volkomen en seker te verbeelden is: […] En nadien niet kan gelooghent werden datter ook trappen in de Schoonheyd zijn, en datmen Schoon, Schoonder en noch Schoonder vindt; soo isser geen reden die ons belett te dencken, datter ook een Alderschoonst is. Doe Aristoteles gevraagt wierd wat Schoonheyd was, en waarom al ’t geen Schoon is, bemind werd ! antwoordde hy: Dat is een Blindemans vrage, {Aristoteles meende datmen niet vragen moest wat Schoonheyd was.} d’Heer Kats heeft hem over de verschillige Keuse der Schoonheyd evenwel niet ruymborstig derven verklaren, want hy spreekter elders dese onsekere woorden van:
Men twist nog evenstaag, men twijffeld overal,
Wat datmen in den Mensch voor SCHOONHEYD keuren sal,
Daar is nauw eenig Volk of ’t heeft verscheide Gronden,
Waarop dat ymand SCHOON of LEELYK werd bevonden.
Seker nadien de verscheyde Volken ook in ’t verkiesen en goedkeuren de
Schoonheyd niet alleen verschillig zijn, maar datter ook sommige gevonden werden die de Leelijkheyd en Mismaaktheyd ten opsigt van andere Oordeelders, voor de Schoonheyd stellen; sulx heeft menig onvast herssebekken in twijffel gebragt; of de Schoonheyd niet wel slegts in een Keur, of in de Mode, of in een eigen Zinnelijkheyd der Menschen bestaat. {In de Keur der Schoonheyd werd somtijts ook de Lelijkheyt voor Schoon aangesien.}

[suggested translation, Marije Osnabrugge:] Many amongst the Old and Young have thought that it is not easy to say nor determine what it really is, that we call Beautiful; and that it is not clear to pinpoint, by which Observations, it is to be depicted perfectly and clear: […] And since it cannot be denied that there are also steps in Beauty, and that one finds Beautiful, more Beautiful and even more Beautiful; as such there is no reason to stop us from thinking that a Most Beautiful also exists. When Aristotle was asked what Beauty was, and why all that is beautiful is loved ! he answered: That is the question of a blind man, {Aristotle thought that one should not ask what nature is.} Mister Cats has not dared to explain himself outspokenly about the different types of Beauty, as he utters these uncertain words about it somewhere: They continue to dispute, everywhere they doubt, What it is that one can judge to be BEAUTY in Man, There is barely any people, or it has different grounds, On which someone is thought BEAUTIFUL or UGLY. Especially since the different Peoples are not only different in choosing and approving Beauty, but that we can find some who place the Ugliness and Deformity before the Beauty in contrast to other Judges; such has brought doubt to unstable brains; whether the Beauty exists but in the Choice, or in Fashion, or in a personal reasoning of Men. {In the Choice of Beauty one did sometimes perceive Ugliness as Beautiful.}

Anciens (les)
CATS, Jacob
Modernes (Les)

schoon

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → beauté, grâce et perfection