GREY (n.)

GRAU (deu.) · GRAU (deu.) · GRAUW (GRADATION OF COLOUR) (nld.) · GRIGIO (ita.) · GRIJS (nld.) · GRIS (fra.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
GRIS (fra.)

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4 quotations

Quotation

A Glassie Gray.
The word Glasse is selfe commeth from the Belgick and high Dutch : Glasse from the verbe
Glansen which signifieth amongst them to shine, from the Greeke […] the same, or perhaps for glacies in the Latine, which Ice, whose colour it resembleth, in French it is called Coleur de voir, in Italian vitreo color di vetro, in high Dutch Glasgrum, in Spanish Color vidrial, in Greeke ὑάλινον of ὑαλος, that is moist, and that from pluere, to raine, from whence also proceed those words in Latine, humus, udus, &c. It is an ayery and greenish white, it serveth to imitate at sometime the skie-glasses of all sorts, fountaines and the like […].

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Ash colour or gray.
In Latine
color Cinerius, in French Coleur cendree, ou grise, Italian Griso beretino, Germane Aschen-frab, Hispan. color de cenizas, In Greeke τεφρώδης […].

ash

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

An Exposition of Colours.
Abram colour,
i.e. brown
Auburne or Abborne,
i.e. brown or brown-black.
Cole black.
Sable black.
Velvet black.
Pitchy black.
Blanket colour,
i. e. a light watchet.
Venice blew,
i. e. a light blew.
Lincolne blew.
Coventry blew.
A Prince blew.
Crimson,
i. e. Scarlet.
Cumatical colour,
i. e. blew.
Flesh colour, a certain mixture of red white.
Gangran colour,
i. e. divers colours together, as in a Mallards, or Pigeons neck.
Sabell colour,
i. e. flame colour.
Incardine, or flesh colour.
Peacocke colour,
i. e. changeable blew, or red blew. 
Patise, or a kinde of red or Arsenick colour.
Plumbet colour,
i. e. like little Speks of gray clouds in a fair day. 
Puke colour,
i. e. between russet and black.
Purpurine, or Purple colour ; of which read
Matth. 27.2. A colour much used heretofore, by the Tyrians ; but now it is not to be had.
Ried colour, or Diversified.
Scarlet,
i. e. crimson, or stammel.
Shammy colour, a smoakie, or rain colour, which is a kind of yellow ; as you may see upon whited walls or in a Chymny.
Stammel,
i. e. Scarlet, as before.
Lyon Tawny.
Turkie colour,
i. e. Venice blew, or as others will have it, red.
Milke white.
Paper white.
Snow white. 
Bastard yellow.
Bright yellow.
Dark yellow.


Of the Names of Colours, read more in
Aul. Gel. Noct. Attic.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

Note, that in all your Shadows you must use some White ; wherefore, 1. lay a good quantity of White by it self, besides what the Shadows are first tempered with. 2. For Red for the Cheeks and Lips, temper Lake and Red-lead together, some use Vermilion, but I like it not. 3. For your Blew Shadows, as under the Eyes, and in Veins, &c. Indico and White, or Ultamarine and White. 4. For your Gray, faintish Shadows, take White English-Oker and Indico, or sometimes Masticote. 5. For Deep shadows, White, English-Oker, and Umber. 6. For Dark-shadows in mens Faces, Lake and Pink, which make an excellent fleshy shadow. Many other Shadows you may temper up, but these are the chief ; your own judgment, when you look upon the party to be Drawn, will best direct you, and inform your fancy better than a thousand Words.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs