DECEIVE (TO) (v.)

BEDRIEGEN (nld.) · BETRÜGEN (deu.) · TROMPER (fra.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
TROMPER (fra.)

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LINKED QUOTATIONS

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3 quotations

Quotation

Now the Painter expresseth two things with his colour : First the colour of the thing, whether it be artificial or natural, which he doth with the like colour, as the colour of a blew garment with artificial blew, or the green colour of a Tree with the like green : Secondly he expresseth the light of the Sun, or any other bright Body apt to lighten or manifest the colours, and because colour cannot be seen without light, being nothing else (as the Philosophers teach) but the extream Superficies of a dark untransparent Body lightned, I hold it expedient for him that will prove exquisite in the use thereof, to be most diligent in searching out the effects of light, when it enlightneth colour, which who so doth seriously consider, shall express all those effects with an admirable Grace ; […].
Now when the
Painter would imitate this blew thus lightned, he shall take his artificial blew colour, counterfeiting therewith the blew of the garment, but when he would express the light, wherewith the blew seems clearer, he must mix so much white with his blew, as he findeth light in that part of the garment, where the light striketh with greater force, considering afterwards the other part of the garment, where there is not so much light, and shall mingle less white with his blew proportionably, and so shall he proceed with the like discretion in all the other parts : and where the light falleth not so vehemently, but only by reflexion there he shall mix so much shadow with his blew, as shall seem sufficient to represent that light, loosing it self as it were by degrees, provided alwayes, that where the light is less darkned, there he place his shadow,
In which judicious expressing of the effects of light together with the
colours, Raphael Urbine, Leonard Vincent, Antonius de Coreggio and Titian were most admirable, handling them with so great discretion and judgement, that their Pictures seemed rather natural, then artificial ; the reason whereof the vulgar Eye cannot conceive, notwithstanding these excellent Masters expressed their chiefest art therein, considering with themselves that the light falling upon the flesh caused these and such like effects, in which kind Titan excelled the rest, who as well to shew his great Skill therein, as to merit commendation, used to cozen and deceive Mens Eyes, […].

cozen

Conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Quotation

Again Titian to make known his art his lights and shadows, when he would express the lightest part of the Body used to add a little too much white, making it much lighter then his pattern, and in the obscure parts, where the light fell by reflexion, a little too much shadow, in resemblance of the decay of the light in that part of the Body, and so his work seemeth to be much raised, and deceive the sight, for the light which cometh to the Eye, in a Pyramidal forme (as shall be shewed in the ensuing discourse) cometh with a blunter and bigger Angle, and so is seen more evidently, whence ariseth a wonderfull eminency, the especial cause whereof is, because there is much more shadow then needeth in that part, where the light decayeth most, so that the vusual lines failing, that part cometh to the Eye in an accuter and sharper angle, and therefore cannot be seen so perfectly, insomuch that that part seemeth to fly inwards, and stand farther off. Thus when the Four parts of a Body are much raised, and the hinder fly sufficiently inwards, there appeareth a very great heightning, which giveth a wonderfrll Spirit, and after this sort Titian beguiled the Eyes of such as beheld his most admirable works.

beguile (to)

Conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Quotation

Friend,
            When a Painter has acquired any Excellency in
Desinging, readily and strongly ; What has he to do next ?
                        Traveller,
            That is not half his Work, for then he must begin to mannage his
Colours, it being particularly by them, that he is to express the greatness of his Art. ’Tis they that give, as it were, Life and Soul to all that he does ; without them, his Lines will be but Lines that are flat, and without a Body, but the addition of Colours makes that appear round ; and as it were out of the Picture, which else would be plain and dull. ’Tis they that must deceive the Eye, to the degree, to make Flesh appear warm and soft, and to give an Air of Life, so as his Picture may seem almost to Breath and Move.
                        Friend,
            Did ever any Painter arrive to that Perfection you mention ?
                        Traveller,
            Yes, several, both of the
Antient and Modern Painters. Zeuxis Painted Grapes, so that the Birds flew at them to eat them. Apelles drew Horses to such a likeness, that upon setting them before live Horses, the Live ones Neighed, and began to kick at them, as being of their own kind. And amongst the Modern Painters, Hannibal Carache, relates to himself, That going to see Bassano at Venice, he went to take a Book off a Shelf, and found it to be the Picture of one, so lively done, that he who was a Great Painter, was deceived by it. The Flesh of Raphael’s Pictures are so Natural, that this seems to be Alive. And so do Titians Pictures, who was the Greatest Master for Colouring that ever was, having attained to imitate Humane Bodies in all the softness of Flesh, and beauty of Skin and Complexion.

Conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → perception et regard
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai