PRACTICE (n.)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGEdéfinition de la peinture
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTUREcouleur · dessin
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUESnature, imitation et vrai
BETRACHTING (nld.) · BEWERKSTELLIGUNG (deu.) · KONST-OEFFENINGH (nld.) · KUNDSCHAP (nld.) · LEEROEFENING (nld.) · PRACTIC (deu.) · PRACTICA (deu.) · PRAKTIJK (nld.) · PRATICA (ita.) · PRATIQUE (fra.) · PRAXIS (deu.) · UITVOERLIJKHEID (nld.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
DOENING (nld.) · PRATIQUE (fra.) · SOIN (fra.)

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CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

8 sources
13 quotations

Quotation

First, let the thing, whose pourtrature you intend to take, stand before you, so that the light be not hindred from falling upon it, and with a pointed peece of charcoale draw it rustically ; which when you have done, consider a while whether all the parts thereof are proportionable, and whether it carry the semblance of the thing that you drew it from, which if it do not, wipe it out with your wing, and begin anew : but if it be faulty in one part onely, wipe onely that part out, and draw it againe ; whensoever it liketh you, or that you have so drawne it, that you can finde no great fault in it ; wipe it over gently with your wing, so that you may perceive the former strokes : then with your blacke chalke, or blacke lead plummets, draw it as perfectly, and as curiously as you can, and shadow it according as the light falleth upon it ; This way is workeman like, and the most difficult of all, yet by a little practice may easily be attained unto: so that the persons stand well affected unto the Art.

Conceptual field(s)

Quotation

An easie way to take the naturall, and lively shape of the leafe of any hearbe or tree, which thing passeth the Art of man to imitate with Pen or Pensill.


First take the leafe that you would have, and gently bruise the ribs and veines on the backe side of it, afterwards wet that side with Linseed-oyle, and then presse it hard upon a peece of cleane white paper, and so you shall have the perfect figure of the said leafe, with every veine thereof, so exactly exprest as being lively coloured, it would seeme to bee truly naturall, by this we learne, that Nature being but a little adjuvated or seconded with Art, can worke wonders.
Now for the farther information of such as are desirous of exemplarie instruction, I have set downe in order following the delineation of the proportion of such things as in my judgement seemed most necessarie for young beginners, and those in such easie demonstrations as for the most part they consist of equall squares, and require no more for their right understanding, then diligent observation, I might have filled a whole Booke of such like: but having considered that what I had done, was a sufficient ground for a farther procession, I thought fitting to leave each person to the exercise and practise of his best Invention.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

The Practice of Drawing or Designing.
{The practice of Drawing and Designing.} I Would prepare you with Rule and Compasse, and other Instruments, necessary for you to lye by you at hand ; but advise you to practise without them ; It is your eye must judge, without artificiall Measuring. And when you have past my first directions, and are perfect to draw by the Life, you may afterwards, in large Proportions and dimensions, use your Instruments, both for perfection, ease, and speed.
[…].

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → apprentissage

Quotation

{Not to Paint ere you can Draw well.} By this time, and Practice, you expect that I should put you into Painting, the usuall longing desire of the Practitioner ; but, forbear, by any means, untill you be excellent in Copying of draughts, according to the foresaid Rules ; nay, untill you can boldly and truly, adventure upon your own fancie, and designe a Pattern for others. And believe it for truth, hastly Colouring, undoes the Painter. He shall never be excellent, that is not ready, in his own Draughts ; Nor be able to paint (and be esteemed) till he understand a Picture as it should be made.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → apprentissage

Quotation

Chap. XIII, Of Drawing, Limning, and Painting: with the lives of the famous Italian Painters.
Since
Aristotle numbreth Graphicè, generally taken, for whatsoever is done with the Pen or Pencill (as writing fair, Drawing, Limning and Painting (amongst those his παιδενματα, or generous Practises of youth in a well governed Common-wealth : I am bound also to give it you in charge for your exercise at leasure, it being a quality most commendable, and so many waies usefull to a Gentleman. For should you (if necessity required) be employed for your Countries service in following the warre, you can describe no plot, manner of fortification, form of Battalia, situation of Town, Castle, Fort, Haven, Island, course of River, passage thorow Wood, Marish ; over Rock, Mountain, &c. […] without the help of the same. {The manifold use of Painting or Limning.} In all Mathematicall Demonstrations, nothing is more required in our travail in forrain Regions. It bringeth home with us from the farthest part of the world in our bosomes, whatsoever is rare and worthy the observance, as the generall Mappe of the Country, the Rivers, Harbourgs, Havens, Promontories, &c within the Landscap, of fair Hils, fruitfull Valleyes : the forms and colours of all Fruits, severall beauties of their Flowers ; […]. And since it is only the imitation of the surface of Nature, by it as in a book of golden and rare-limmed Letters, the chief use end of it, we read a continuall Lecture of the Wisdome of the Almighty Creator […].

Conceptual field(s)

Quotation

CHAP. III. Of the precepts of Drawing in General.
 
I. Be sure to have all the necessaries aforesaid in readiness, but it will be good to practise as much as may be without the help of your Rule and Compasses ; it is your eye and fansie must judge without artificial measurings.

II.
Then first begin with plain Geometrical figures, [...]. For these are the foundations of all other proportions.
[...]
IV. Having made your hand fit and ready in General proportions, then learn to give every object its due shade according to its convexity or concavity, and to elevate or depress the same, as the object appears either nearer or farther off the light, the which is indeed the life of the work.
V.
The second practice of drawing consists in forming fruits, as Apples, Peares, Cherries, [...] with their leaves : the imitation of flowers, as Roses, Tulips, Carnations, &c. Herbs, as Rosemary, Time, Hysop, &c. Trees, as the Oak, Fir, Ash, Wallnut, &c.
VI.
The third practice of drawing imitates, 1. Beats, as the Lamb, Elephant, [...]. 2. Fowls, as the Eagle, Swan, [...]. 3. Fishes, as the Whale, Herring, [...] of which variety of Prints may be bought at reasonables rates.
VII. The fourth praxis imitates the body of man with all its Lineaments, the Head, Nose, Eyes, Ears, Cheeks, Hands, Arms, and shaddows all exactly proportional both to the whole and one to another, as well to situation as magnitude.
VIII. The fifth praxis is in Drapery, imitating Cloathing, and Artificially setting off the outward Coverings, Habit & Ornaments of the Body, as Cloath, Stuff, Silk and Linnen, their natural and proper folds ; which although it may seem something hard to do, yet by much exercise and imitation of the choisest Prints will become facile and easie.
IX. In drawing of all the aforegoing forms, or what ever else, you must be perfect, first in the exact proportions : secondly in the general or outward lines before you fall to shadowing or trimming of your work within.
X. In mixed and uncertain forms, where Circle and Square will do no good (but onely the Idea thereof in your own fansie) as in Lions, Horses, and the like ; you must work by reason in your own judgment, and so obtain the true proportion by daily practice. Thus,
Having the shape of the thing in your mind, first draw it rudely with your coal, then more exactly with your lead or pensil ; then peruse it well, and consider where you have erred, and mend it, according to that Idea, which you carry in your mind ; this done, view it again, correcting by degrees the other parts, even to the least Jota, so far as your judgement will inform you ; and this you may do with twenty, thirty, fourty or more papers of several things at once : having done what you can, confer it with some excellent pattern or print of like kind, using no rule or compass at all, but your own reason, in mending every fault, giving every thing its due place, and just proportion ; by this means you may rectifie all your errours, and step and Incredible way on to perfection.

praxis

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → apprentissage
L’ARTISTE → règles et préceptes

Quotation

Hence it appeareth that Painting is an Art, because it imitateth natural things most precisely, and is the counterfeiter and (as it were) the very Ape of nature ; whose Quantity, Eminency and Colours, it ever striveth to imitate, performing the same by the help of Geometry, Arithmetick, Perspective, and Natural Philosophy, with most Infallible Demonstrations, but because of Arts some be Liberal, and some Mechanical, it shall not be amiss, to shew amongst which of them Painting ought to be numbred. {Painting is a liberal Art.} Now Pliny calleth it plainly a liberal Art, which authority of his may be proved by reason, for although the Painter cannot attain to his end, but by working both with his hand and pencil, yet there is so little pains and labour bestowed in this Exercise, that there is no Ingenious Man in the World, unto whose Nature it is not most agreeable, and infinitely pleasant.
For we read of the French King
Francis, the First of that name, that he oftentimes delighted to handle the pencil, by exercising, drawing and painting ; […], so that in these and the like Exercises, nothing is Base or Mechanical, but all Noble and Ingenious.
[…]. Farthermore it cannot be denied, but that the
Geometrician also worketh with the Hand, by drawing Lines, as Circles, Triangles, Quadrangles and such like Figures ; neither yet did ever any Man therefore account Geometry a Mechanical Art because the Hand-labour therein imployed is so sleight, that it were an absurdity in respect thereof, to reckon it a base condition.
The like reason is there of
painting, the Practice whereof, doth so little weary a Man, that he which was Noble before, cannot justly be reputed Base by exercising the same ; but if besides all this, we shall farther consider, that Painting is subordinate to the Perspectives, to Natural philosophy, and Geometry (all which out of question are Liberal Sciences) and moreover that it hath certain Demonstrable conclusions, deduced from the First and immediate Principalls thereof, we must needs conclude that it is a Liberal Art.

Conceptual field(s)

PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la peinture

Quotation

In imitation whereof, I hold it expedient for a Painter, to delight in seeing those which fight at cuffs, to observe the Eyes of privy murtherers, the courage of wrastlers, the actions of Stage-players, and the inticing allurements of curtesans, to the end he be not to seek many particulars, wherein the very Life and Soul of painting consisteth, wherefore, I could wish all Men carefully to keep their Brains waking, which whosoever shall omit his invention (out of doubt) will sleep, studying perhaps Ten Years about the action of one Figure, which in the end will prove nothing worth, whence all famous inventors, for the avoiding of such gross defects, have the rather shewed themselves subtile Searchers out of the effects of nature, being moved thereunto by a special delight of often seeing, and continually practizing that which they have preconceived, so that who so keepeth this Order, shall unawares attain to such an habit of practice, in lively expressing all Actions and Gestures, best fitting his purpose, that it will become an other nature.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Traveller,
           
You must know, that the Italians have a Way of Painting their Pallaces, both within and without, upon the bear Walls, and before Oyl Painting came up, most Masters wrought that Way ; and it is the most Masterly of all the ways of Painting, because it is done upon a Wall newly Plaistered, and you must Plaister no more, than what you can do in a Day ; the Colours being to Incorporate with the Mortar, and dry with it, and it cannot be Touched over again, as all other Ways of Painting may : This is that they call Painting in Fresco.
                        Friend,
            This must require a very Dexterous and quick Hand.
                        Traveller.
            Yes, and a good Judgment too ; f
or the Colours will show otherwise when they are Dry, than they did when they were Wet : Therefore there is great Practice required in Mannaging them, but then this Way makes amends for its Difficulties ; for the longer it stands, it acquires still more Beauty and Union, it resisting both Wind and Rain. 

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

Quotation

Friend.
 
            What is properly the Colouring of a Piece of Painting ?
 
                        Traveller.
 
           
It is the Art of employing the Colours proper to the Subject, with a regard to the Lights and Shadows that are incident to the Story, either according to the Truth of it, or to the Painter’s Invention : and out of the Management of these comes all the Strength, Relievo, and Roundness that the Figures have : ’tis hard to give Positive Rules here, it depending much on Practice ; but the most General is, so to manage your Colours, Lights, and Shadows, that the Bodies enlightned may appear by the Opposition of your Shadows ;

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

Quotation

Drawing consists of several General precepts to be learnt of every one that is desirous to attian to Perfection therein ; the practice of which requires Observation, Discretion, and Judgement ; in which, Proportions, Motions, and Actions are with great care and diligence to be followed : And therefore he that will attain to the perfection of this excellent Practice, it is necessary he should not be ignorant of Mathematical Demonstration in the Rules of Geometry and Perspective ; of which in this Book you shall receive Instructions. Of all other proportions, the Body of man hath the pre-eminence for excellency, from which all other Arts are derived, as many of the learned have concluded ; for Vitruvius noteth, that the Architect hence took the observations of his Buildings, Man being the first pattern of all Artificial things ; and Antiquity hath so graced Painting, (as being the chief Mistress of Proportion) so that all other Artificers are called Handy-crafts or Mechanicks.

Conceptual field(s)

Quotation

Chap. IV, Of the first Practice of Drawing.
SECT. I.
Of Geometrical Figures.
Being provided of all necessary Instruments for Drawing, proceed to Practice ; and first begin with plain Geometrical figures, such as the
Circle, Oval, Square, Triangle, Cone, Cylinder ; all which your Rule and Compasses will help you in : but first endeavour to draw them by hand, which with a little practice you may attain. I have my self, by taking a Black-lead Pencil in my hand, and holding it as I do a Pen, and restling the end of my little finder upon my paper, turning the paper about with my left hand, and have described a Circle so exact, that a pair of Compasses could not discover an errour : I say, practice the making and drawing of these by hand, for they are all useful in one kind or other. […].


SECT. II.
Of the second practice of Drawing.
Having practised these Figures, proceed to the drawing of
Cherries, Pears, Apples, Apricocks, Peaches, Grapes, Strawberries, Peascods, Butterflies, and such like.


SECT. III.
Of the third Practice.
Imitate
Flowers, as Roses, Tulips, Carnations, &c. Also Beasts, […]. Then practice Birds, […]. Then Fishes, […]. Of all which there are Books to be bought at very reasonable rates.


SECT. IV.
Of the fourth Practice.
Imitate the Body and Parts of the Body of Man ; in the practice whereof beware of the common errors usually committed, as of drawing the Head too big for the Body, and others the like ; which to prevent, you have here presented to your view the
Heads, Noses, Mouths, Hands, Arms, Feet, Legs, Bodies ; also whole Figures of Men, Women, and Children in several postures, being Copies of the best Masters extant, with Rules and Directions for Drawing every particuler member of the Body, and that I would have you now to practice, you having gone sufficiently forward with the others before noted.

ANONYME, [Bouches, planche 4], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 27 - planche 4.
ANONYME, [Bras, planche 7], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 30 - planche 7.
ANONYME, [Enfant de face et de dos, planche 11], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 37 - planche 11.
ANONYME, [Enfants dans diverses positions, planche 12], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 38 - planche 12.
ANONYME, [Femme et homme de dos, planche 14], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 40 - planche 14.
ANONYME, [Femme et homme de face, planche non numérotée], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 39.
ANONYME, [Jambes, planche 10], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 33 - planche 10.
ANONYME, [Mains, planche 5], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 28 - planche 5.
ANONYME, [Mains, planche 6], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 29 - planche 6.
ANONYME, [Oreilles et yeux, planche 3], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 26 - planche 3.
ANONYME, [Pieds, planche 9], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 32 - planche 9.
ANONYME, [Torses, planche non numérotée], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 35.
ANONYME, [Visages, planche 1], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 24 - planche 1.
ANONYME, [Visages, planche 2], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 42 - planche 2.
ANONYME, [Visages, planche non numérotée], estampe, dans ANONYME, The Excellency of the Pen and Pencil, Exemplifying The Uses of them in the most Exquisite and Mysterious Arts of Drawing, Etching, Engraving, Limning, Painting in Oyl, Washing of Maps & Pictures. Also the way to Cleanse any Old Painting, and Preserve the Colours. Collected from the Writings of the ablest Masters both Ancient and Modern, as Albert Durer, P. Lomantius, and divers others. Furnished with divers Cuts in Copper, being Copied from the best Masters, and here inserted for Examples for the Learner to Practice by. A Work very useful for all Gentlemen, and other Ingenious Spirits, either Artificers or others, London, Dorman Newman, 1688, p. 43.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → apprentissage

Quotation

Draught is a Physical Line, or Lineal Demonstration ; and hath always some Dimentions, if it be never so slender : and serves to represent Bodys according to their Forms, Aspects and Scituation ; Limiting and Determining the surface of an Object ; and Making out the Several Parts, which are contain’d therein. For no Superficies can Exist, without being Terminated by Lines, Streight, Circular or Mixt.
            The
Extent of Draught is Immense ; for it is not only concern’d in all the Visible Things in Nature, but in all Things which the Fancy or Imagination can form any Idea of, that can be compris’d under the Figure of Body : nay, so vast is its extent, that it adventures to Dive into the very Soul, and express its Thoughts ; for though Colour is accessary to Expression, yet nothing can be Terminated without Lines.
            They that would arrive to the Perfection in the
Practick, must dilligently observe these following Rules.
            First he must draw by the Hand,
Circles, Ovals, &c. Then the several Features of the Face by themselves, [...] then the several Members, [...]. Observing in the Hands and Feet, to draw the upper Lines first then the lower ; [...].
            When he attempts a whole Body, he must begin with a Body standing Frontwise, [...].
            For
Rustick and Country Figures, the Contours must be Gross, Equally Counterhatch’d and Notch’d, without regard to extraordinary Neatness and Roundness.
            But for Grave and serious Persons, they must be rounded, noble and Certain ; not so at adventure as the foremention’d.
            They must be strong, Resolute, Noble, Perfect and Chose for
Heroes.
            They must be Puissant and Austere, full of Greatness and Majesty, for
Deifyd Bodys.
            And for
young Women and Children, the Contours must be Smooth, Round and Delicate.
            They must Design the Nudity, Model, &c. exactly, without Charging or overburthening any of their Parts ; their being no way to obtain an entire exactness, but by proportioning every part with the first, comparing them exactly, so that we may be at liberty to Strengthen and go over again the Parts as we shall think fit, when we make use of this Design ; as it truly follows and represents the Models whither they be Antique or Natural.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → dessin
L’ARTISTE → règles et préceptes