LOVER (OF ART) (n.)

AMATEUR (fra.) · KONST-LIEVENDE MAN (nld.) · KONST-LIEVER (nld.) · KUNSTMINNAAR (nld.) · LIEBHABER (deu.) · LIEFHEBBER (nld.) · WOHLGÖNNER (deu.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
KONST-LIEVENDE MAN (nld.) · KONST-LIEVER (nld.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
AMATEUR (fra.)
SALERNO, Luigi, « Seventeenth-Century English Literature on Painting », Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, 14/3-4, 1951, p. 234-258 [En ligne : http://www.jstor.org/stable/750341 consulté le 30/03/2018].

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6 quotations

Quotation

But some will tell me, Mechanicall Arts, and those wrought with the hand are for the most part base, and unworthy the practise of great personages, and Gentlemen […]. But forasmuch as their ends are honest, and themselves but the exercises of pregnant and the finest wits, I see no reason (as one saith) why nature should be so much wronged in her intention, as not to produce at her pleasure that into action whereto shee is well inclined {Exam. de Ingenios.}. And surely it can bee no more disgrace to a great Lord to draw a faire Picture, then to cut his Hawkes meate, or play at Tennis with his Page. […].
Pomponius Atticus a man of singular wisedome, and so much beloved of Cicero, after he had composed a Poeme of sundry devises, beautified the same with pictures of his owne Drawing.
[…]. Since Painting then hath beene so well esteemed, and of it owne nature is so linked with the other Arts, as many of them can hardly stand without it. I thinke it not for pleasure onely, but of necessitie most needfull to be practised of all such, that either studie the Mathematikes, the art Military, or purpose to travell for the benefit of their friends and countrey. I have heard many excellent Captaines and Schollers lament so great a want in themselves, otherwise being most absolute.
My Scholler then I would make choise of, should be a young Gentleman, if it might be, naturally inclined to drawing, at least a welwiller and lover of it.

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Quotation

Chap. XX, Of Antiquities
Out of the Treasury and Storehouse of venerable Antiquities, I have selected these three sorts.
Statues, Inscriptions, and Coynes ; desiring you to take a short view of them, ere you proceed any further.
The pleasure of them is best known to such as have seen them abroad in
France, Spain, and Italy […]. And indeed, the possession of such Rarities, by reason of their dead costliness, doth properly belong to Princes, or rather to princely minds. […]. Sure I am, that he that will travel, most both heed them, and understand them, if he desire to be though ingenious, and to be welcome to the owners. For next men and manners, there is nothing fairly more delightful, nothing worthier observation, than these Copies, and memorials of men, and matters of elder times ; whose lively presence is able to perswade a man, that he now seeth two thousand years ago. Such as are skilded in them, are by the Italians termed Virtuosi, as if others that either neglect or despise them, were idiots, or rake-hels. And to say truth, they are somewhat to be excused, if they have all Leefhebbers (as the Dutch call them) in so high estimatiion, for they themselves are so great lovers of them (& similis simili gaudet) that they purchase them at any rate, and lay up mighty treasures of money in them.

liefhebber · virtuosi

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Quotation

Friend,
            I Am come to Summon you of your Promise [ndr : de lui raconter l’histoire de la peinture] ; and you may see by my Impatience ; that you have already made me a Lover of the Art.
                        Traveller,
           
I am glad to see it ; for it is no small Pleasure to think, that we are capable of procuring Pleasure to others, as I am sure I shall do to you, when I have made you thorowly capable of understanding the Beauty of an Art that has been the Admiration of Antiquity, and is still the greatest Charm of the most polite part of Mankind.
                        Friend,
            Pray who do you mean by that glorious Epithete.
                        Traveller ;
           
I mean chiefly the Italians, to whom none can deny the Priviledge of having been the Civilisers of Europe, since Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, Musick, Gardening, polite Conversation, and prudent Behaviour are, as I may call it, all of the Growth of their Countrey ; and I mean, besides all those in France, Spain, Germany, Low-Countreys, and England, who are Lovers of those Arts, and endeavour to promote them in their own Nation.
                        Friend,
            I confess, they are all ravishing Entertainments, and infinitely to be preferr’d before our other sensual Delights, which destroy our Health, and dull our Minds ; and I hope they are travelling apace this way. But now pray satisfie my Curiosity about this Art of Painting, and let me know its whole History.

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SPECTATEUR → connaissance
SPECTATEUR → perception et regard

Quotation

Monsieur de Piles has a pretty Invention of a Scale whereby he gives an Idea in short of the Merit of the Painters, I have given some Account of it in the latter end of my former Essay : This, with a little Alteration and Improvement may be of great use to Lovers of Art, and Connoisseurs.

connoisseur

term translated by AMATEUR in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 29.

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SPECTATEUR → jugement

Quotation

That so Few here in England have consider’d that to be a Good Connoisseur is fit to be part of the Education of a Gentleman, That there are so Few Lovers of Painting ; not merely for Furniture, or for Ostentation, or as it Represents their Friends, or Themselves ; but as it is an Art capable of Entertaining, and Adorning their Minds As much as, nay perhaps More than Any other whatsoever ;

connoisseur

term translated by AMATEUR in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 116.

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SPECTATEUR → connaissance

Quotation

And if moreover what I write may hereafter happen to be of use of any body else, whether it be to put a Lover of Art in a Method to judge of a Picture, (and which in most things a Gentleman may do altogether as well as a Painter) or to awaken some useful Hints in some of my own Profession ; […] If these Consequences happen, it will be a Satisfaction to me over and above.

term translated by AMATEUR in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 7-8.

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