FLESH (n.)

CARNE (ita.) · CHAIR (fra.) · VLEES (nld.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
CARNATION (fra.) · CHAIR (fra.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
CARNATION (fra.)
LEHMANN, Anne-Sophie, « Hautfarben : zur Maltechnik des Inkarnats und der Illusion des lebendigen Körpers in der europäischen Malerei der Neuzeit », dans GEISSMAR-BRANDI, Christoph et HIJLYA-KIRSCHNEREIT, Irmela (éd.), Geschiter der Haut, Frankfurt am Main, Stroemfeld - Nexus, 2002, p. 93-128.

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

4 sources
5 quotations

Quotation

Now the Painter expresseth two things with his colour : First the colour of the thing, whether it be artificial or natural, which he doth with the like colour, as the colour of a blew garment with artificial blew, or the green colour of a Tree with the like green : Secondly he expresseth the light of the Sun, or any other bright Body apt to lighten or manifest the colours, and because colour cannot be seen without light, being nothing else (as the Philosophers teach) but the extream Superficies of a dark untransparent Body lightned, I hold it expedient for him that will prove exquisite in the use thereof, to be most diligent in searching out the effects of light, when it enlightneth colour, which who so doth seriously consider, shall express all those effects with an admirable Grace ; […].
Now when the
Painter would imitate this blew thus lightned, he shall take his artificial blew colour, counterfeiting therewith the blew of the garment, but when he would express the light, wherewith the blew seems clearer, he must mix so much white with his blew, as he findeth light in that part of the garment, where the light striketh with greater force, considering afterwards the other part of the garment, where there is not so much light, and shall mingle less white with his blew proportionably, and so shall he proceed with the like discretion in all the other parts : and where the light falleth not so vehemently, but only by reflexion there he shall mix so much shadow with his blew, as shall seem sufficient to represent that light, loosing it self as it were by degrees, provided alwayes, that where the light is less darkned, there he place his shadow,
In which judicious expressing of the effects of light together with the
colours, Raphael Urbine, Leonard Vincent, Antonius de Coreggio and Titian were most admirable, handling them with so great discretion and judgement, that their Pictures seemed rather natural, then artificial ; the reason whereof the vulgar Eye cannot conceive, notwithstanding these excellent Masters expressed their chiefest art therein, considering with themselves that the light falling upon the flesh caused these and such like effects, in which kind Titan excelled the rest, who as well to shew his great Skill therein, as to merit commendation, used to cozen and deceive Mens Eyes, […].

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

Friend,
            When a Painter has acquired any Excellency in
Desinging, readily and strongly ; What has he to do next ?
                        Traveller,
            That is not half his Work, for then he must begin to mannage his
Colours, it being particularly by them, that he is to express the greatness of his Art. ’Tis they that give, as it were, Life and Soul to all that he does ; without them, his Lines will be but Lines that are flat, and without a Body, but the addition of Colours makes that appear round ; and as it were out of the Picture, which else would be plain and dull. ’Tis they that must deceive the Eye, to the degree, to make Flesh appear warm and soft, and to give an Air of Life, so as his Picture may seem almost to Breath and Move. [...] Friend,
            Wherein particularly lies the Art of
Colouring ?
            Traveller.
Beside the Mixture of Colours, such as may answer the Painter’s Aim, it lies in a certain Contention, as I may call it, between the Light and the Shades, which by the means of Colours, are brought to Unite with each other ; and so to give that Roundness to the Figures, which the Italians call Relievo, and for which we have no other Name : In this, if the Shadows are too strong, the Piece is harsh and hard, if too weak, and there be too much Light, ’tis flat. I, for my part, should like a Colouring rather something Brown, but clear, than a bright gay one : But particularly, I think, that those fine Coral Lips, and Cherry Cheeks, are to be Banished, as being far from Flesh and Blood. ’Tis true, the Skins, or Complexions must vary, according to the Age and Sex of the Person ; An Old Woman requiring another Colouring than a fresh Young one.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

Traveller.
           
There is a thing which the Italians call Morbidezza ; The meaning of which word, is to Express the Softness, and tender Liveliness of Flesh and Blood, so as the Eye may almost invite the Hand to touch and feel it, as if it were Alive ; and this is the hardest thing to Compass in the whole Art of Painting. And ‘tis in this particular, that Titian, Corregio, and amongst the more Modern, Rubens, and Vandike, do Excel.
                       
Friend.
            I have heard, that in some Pictures of Raphael, the very Gloss of Damask, and the Softness of Velvet, with the Lustre of Gold, are so Expressed, that you would take them to be Real, and not Painted : Is not that as hard to do, as to imitate Flesh ?
                        Traveller.
            No : Because those things are but the stil Life, whereas there is a Spirit in Flesh and Blood, which is hard to Represent. But a good Painter must know how to do those Things you mention, and many more : As for Example, He must know how to Imitate the Darkness of Night, the Brightness of Day, the Shining and Glittering of Armour ; the Greenness of Trees, the Dryness of Rocks. In a word, All Fruits, Flowers, Animals, Buildings, so as that they all appear
Natural and Pleasing to the Eye.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

The Light falling on the Flesh of Young Women and Children causeth a Pleasant, Tender Shaddow without much Reflection ; but when on old hard and stiff Flesh, it remaineth more Harsh, the shaddows being harder : [...].

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité de la lumière
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

Quotation

Flesh in Pictures to be seen at a common distance, and especially Portraits, should (generally speaking) be well wrought up, and then touch d upon every where in the Principal Lights, and Shadows, and to pronounce the Features ; and this more, or less, according to the Sex, Age, or Character of the Person, avoiding Narrow, or long continued Strokes, as in the Eye-lids, Mouth, &c. and too many Sharp ones : This being done by a Light Hand, Judiciously, gives a Spirit, and retains the Softness of Flesh.

term translated by CARNATION in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 135.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps
EFFET PICTURAL → touche