FANCY (n.)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTUREcouleur
GENRES PICTURAUXpaysage
L’ARTISTEqualités
FANTAISIE (fra.) · FANTASIA (ita.) · IMAGINATION (fra.) · PHANTASIE (deu.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
DÉSIR (fra.) · GEEST (nld.)

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

3 sources
4 quotations

Quotation

{Of Imitation.} The powers of a Painter, is expresses, by Imitation of Naturall things, whereof the most excellent, are ever, the most difficult ; easie to paint deformity.
{In severall graces and abilities.} In your Imitations of Art or Copying, observe to hit the virtues of the Piece, and to refuse the vices ; for all
Masters have somewhat, of them both. For, Paintings, may be puft-up, but not stately ; starved in Colour, nor delicate ; rash, not Confident ; Negligent, not Plain. […].
{Of Fancie.} Proficiency of
Painting, is purchased, not (altogether) by Imitation, (the common drole-way of ordinary Painters) if you neglect the amendment, by your own generous fancie ; (Est autem proprie Imago rerum animo insidentium). For, he that only follows another’s steps, must (needs) be the last in the race : Lazy Painters study not, the brain : Nature can do much with Doctrine ; but not Doctrine, without Nature : Nature, is of greater Moment : Every Artificer hath a peculiar Grace, in his own worke, agreeing to his Nature ; though many (of the other sort,) owe most to Doctrine.
{Surpassing Imitation.} The force, of Imitation of
Nature, is in the Fancie ; which worketh with the more Wisdome. It being an imaginative faculty, or wit, and is set on worke to imagine, what we have seen (or at least made up with some other Sense) being the Print or foot-steps of Sense. It is the treasury of the mind, The darkness of night awakes our Speculations of the day ; when sleep failes, the Mind does, then, digest the conceived things into Order ; that so, the whole invention wants nothing, but the hand of the Artificer, to effect the worke ; and, without Art, to do, Imagination is uselesse ; Fancie supplyes Imitation’s weakness : the property and Office whereof, is to retain those images, and figures, which the Common Sense receives : First, from the exterior sense ; and then transmits it to the judgemnt ; from thence, to the fancie ; and there locked up, and covered in the memory ; and we may alter and move with the re-presentation of things, although it have them not present, which the common Sense cannot have, unlesse present.
[…].

imagination

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → génie, esprit, imagination
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

I cannot prescribe, how to order your light, in a piece of Landskip by the Life ; for according to the place, as you look North, or Southward, East, or West-ward, as the time of the day and the Sun’s declination, so must you order your shadows as they appear. But in all working of Painting by Fancie, let your light descend from your left, to your right hand : So will it appear upon the work, from the right to the left, the more gracefull. […].
{To make a Landskip.} In making it ; First, beginne with a large
skie or Element and if there be any shining or reflection of the Sunne, (in which only the Dutch are neat and curious,) then you must be carefull, by no meanes to mixe Red-lead, or Mene, in the purple of the skie, or Clouds, but only with Lake and White ; […] For you must not mingle the blew Colours of the Clouds with any Pensil that hath touched Masticoate ; It will make the skie Greenish and discoloured.
[…].

Conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → paysage
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → génie, esprit, imagination

Quotation

CHAP. III. Of the precepts of Drawing in General.
 
I. Be sure to have all the necessaries aforesaid in readiness, but it will be good to practise as much as may be without the help of your Rule and Compasses ; it is your eye and fansie must judge without artificial measurings.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités

Quotation

Friend.
 
            What is properly the Colouring of a Piece of Painting ?
 
                        Traveller.
 
           
It is the Art of employing the Colours proper to the Subject, with a regard to the Lights and Shadows that are incident to the Story, either according to the Truth of it, or to the Painter’s Invention : and out of the Management of these comes all the Strength, Relievo, and Roundness that the Figures have : ’tis hard to give Positive Rules here, it depending much on Practice ; but the most General is, so to manage your Colours, Lights, and Shadows, that the Bodies enlightned may appear by the Opposition of your Shadows ; which by that means may make the Eye rest with Pleasure upon them ; and also, that there be an imperceptible passage from your Shadows to your Lights. [...] Tis true, that Beautiful Colours may be employed, but they must be such as make not your Piece like a Picture, rather than like Nature it self ; and particularly, you must observe to express the true Temper as well as the true Phisionomy of the Persoms that are Drawn ; for it would be very absurd to give a Smiling, Airy Countenance to a Melancholly Person ; or, to make a Young, Lively Woman, Heavy and Grave. ’Tis said of Apelles, that he expressed the Countenance and true Air of the Persons he Drew, to so great a degree, that several Physionomists did predict Events upon his Pictures to the Persons Drawn by him, and that with true Success. If after that, you can give your Picture a great Relievo, and make your Colours Represent the true Vivacity of Nature, you have done your Work as to that part of Painting, which is no small one, being, next to History, the most difficult to obtain ; for though there be but little Invention required, yet ‘tis necessary to have a Solid Judgment and Lively Fancy.

Conceptual field(s)

L’ARTISTE → qualités
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur