COLOURING (n.)

ANFÄRBUNG (deu.) · ANSTREICHUNG (deu.) · APPLICIRUNG (deu.) · COLORIET (nld.) · COLORIS (fra.) · COLORITO (ita.) · FARBEN-GEBUNG (deu.) · FARBUNG (deu.) · KLEURING (nld.) · KOLORIRUNG (deu.) · KOLORIT (deu.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
COLORIS (fra.) · COULEUR (fra.) · KLEUR (ALGEMEEN) (nld.) · KLEURING (nld.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
COLORIS (fra.)
GIBSON-WOOD, Carol, Jonathan Richardson: Art Theorist of the English Enlightenment, New Haven - London, Yale University Press, 2000.

FILTERS

CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

10 sources
27 quotations

Quotation

Of Painting,
The principall end and subject of this Art, is to set out things both in proportion of parts, and livelinesse of colour.
For the former, the proportion of parts, I have given sufficient information for the meanest capacitie in the precedent part of this tractat
: now therefore I will speake of the other, the colouring or setting out in colours. But first provide a frame or Easel called by Artists, which is very necessary to worke upon, especially in greater pieces of worke : the forme whereof followeth [ndr : présence d’un dessin de chevalet].
Also you must provide divers little shels to put your colours in, also pensils or all sorts, both for priming and other : a light ruler of one foot and a halfe, or two foot long : and colours of all sorts ground very fine upon a porphire or marble. […].
Painting may be performed either with water colours, or with oyle colours.
First I will speake of water colours, wherein I shall observe two things.
First, the diversitie of colours, and preparations. Secondly, their mixture, and manner of laying them on the ground.
First of the first, the diversitie of colours and their preparation.
Colours are either simple or compounded, meerely tinctures of vegetables, or substances of minerals, or both : the simple colours are such as of themselves, being tempered with the water or oyle, doe give a colour. The compounded are such, whose ingredients do exceed the number of one. Vegetables are rootes, juces, berries, and such like things as grow out of the earth. Minerals are such as are dig’d out of the earth, as earth, and stones, &c. All which follow in order, as well their preparations, as description. First note that every colour to be ground, ought first to be ground with the gall of a neat : then let them dry of themselves in a cold place, afterwards grinde them with gumme water for your use.
Now I am to come to the second thing observable (to wit) the mixture and laying the colours on the grounds, which is thus: your colours prepared for use, ought to be tempered according unto direction, still observing a meane : and to that end, mixe them by little and little, till the colour please you ; first you must lay on the ground colour, and let it dry throughly : then with a small pensill, pricke on the second colour, else it will be apt to run abroad, nor can you worke it so well, to make it seeme lively, as you may by pricking it one, specially in small peeces. 

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

Quotation

Of Colouring
{Colouring. what ?} Corruption composition or mixing of
Colours, we call Painting ; which is, to express shadows in Colours ; thereby, to resemble, what we do desire to imitate, by a moderate confusion, or tempering, discordant Colours ; as white, black, red, blew, green, &c.
[…].
{With Light and shadows.} Observe herein
Light and Shadows, Obscurity and Brightnesse.
Contrary things are more apparant, being placed neer their Contraries ;
Light and Shadows forward, set out any Painting outwards ; as if you might take hold of any part.
Obscurity or Darknesse, is the duskishness of a deeper shadow ; as brightness is the Intension of Light.
White appears sooner, or neerer to the Eye ; and the black seems farther off, any thing that should seem hollow (as in a Well, or Cave,) must be coloured blackish ; more deep, more black.
On the contrary, to lighten or rise forward, with
white.
{Tonus, what?}
Tonus or brightnesse ; as it is of necessary use, so of excellent ornament in a Picture, it is which is above light ; {A Brightness.} sparkling as in the glory of Angels, twinckling of precious stones ; […] : the variety of these Ornaments, must be expressed excellently ; but avoid satiety, not cloy your Picture with it.
{Harmogia what ?}
Harmoge in Colours, is an unperceivable way of Arts ; stealing to pass from one Colour to another, as in the sea and skie meeting in one thin mistly Horizontall stroake, both are lost and confounded in sight ; […]. [...] And so have we done with an Example of all in One : For
 
                       Invention
allures the mind.
                       Proportion, attracts the Eyes.
                       Colour ;
delights the Fancie.
                      
Lively Motion, stirs up our Soul.
                      
Orderly Disposition, charmes our Senses.
 
{Conclude a rare Picture.} These produce gracefull
Comliness, which makes one fairer then fair ; […].
This Grace is the close of all, effected by a familiar facility in a free and quick spirit of a bold and resolute Artificer ; not to be done by too much double
diligence, or over doing ; a careless shew, hath much of Art.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → lumière

Quotation

Four severall sorts of Colouring.
{Four severall wayes of Colouring.} Indeed and briefly there are four severall kind of Colouring to be observed in
History. Of young Infants, of faire virgins, of young women, of old women, in every of these severallly. It is in the power of a judicious Artist, to vary and change their manner of colouring, according to his discretion, or as the occasion and subject of his intention shall require.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

Quotation

XV. In colouring and shadowing of every thing ; you must do the same in your picture which you observe with your Eye, especially in objects lying near ; but according as the distance grows greater and greater, so the Colours must be fainter and fainter, till at last they loose themselves in a darkish sky colour.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → perspective
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

Quotation

Of Colouring and Shadowing of History in Limning, and also other Necessary Observations.


The differences between Limning Pictures to the Life, or History, are Infinite ; notwithstanding the same Colours that are used for one do also for the other. And to particularise but part of what may be well said upon this Subject, would be too tedeous, if not endless. The most Remarkable is most certainly in the Variety of Colouring of things according to their several Sexes and Ages ; and also of Invention of ordering and well Stelling. All things which are to be represented, are many times according to the Humour, Judgement, and Discretion of the Master. We see generally in the Practice of the best and most Famous Painters, that they that do follow the Life, do tie themselves strictly and precisely to follow what they see in the Life, to immitate it as near as possible ; yet in their Inventions they assume to themselves such a Gentile Liberty and Licence, both in Colouring and Ordering ; but not so far as to run into those Extremes as
Bartholomæus Spranger, Henry Goltzius, Abraham Blomart, and Outeawale, and several other Dutch Painters, run into about the Year 1588 ; for their Inventions at that time and Actions were so extravagantly strain’d and stretch to that degree beyond Nature, that made their Works seem to the Judicious Eye very Ridiculous, and contrary to Nature ; and at that time it was grown to such an Imposture or Mode, that he was counted no Master that could not strain his Actions in that extravagant manner. Which Mode was afterwards laid aside, and the Works that those Masters afterwards made were incomparably Good, by their Embracing more the Ancient Italian way of DESIGNING, which was more Modest, Gentile, and Graceful. So far they abused the Modest Licence, that so Graced the Admirable Works of Titian, Michael Angelo, and most of the Eminent Italians of that Age. And others have been as Extravagant in their Colouring. Which two Extremes may be both avoided by imitating that Divine Titian for Colouring, who was of all others esteemed the best.

Conceptual field(s)

MANIÈRE ET STYLE → le faire et la main

Quotation

Of the four kinds of Colourings, which are generally to be observed in Historical Limning.


In brief, I imagine there are Four kinds of Colourings generally to be followed and observed in History,
viz. of Young Infants, of Fair Women, of Virgins middle aged, and Old Women. And every of these Complexions is in the power of the Judicious Master to vary and change his manner of Colouring, according as his Genius or Judgment directs him, or as the Subject requires. As for Infants and Young Children, they are commonly of a thin and tender Complexion ; the Carnatian and delicate Colour Nature affords in the Cheeks and Ears, the Skin appearing almost Transparent ; which you may very well express with a Temperature of White Carmine and a little Red Lead. The Shadows are to be Thin, Subtile, Faint, and Tender, as the Parties you wouold represent. […]. 
Observations on the Complexions of Virgins and fair Young Women.
[…]. 
Of the Temperature and Colouring for Old Mens Bodies.
[…].

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → figure et corps

Quotation

Colouring.
’Tis one of the parts of Painting, by which the Objects to be painted receive their Complexion, together with their True Lights and Shadows.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

Quotation

Friend,
            When a Painter has acquired any Excellency in
Desinging, readily and strongly ; What has he to do next ?
                        Traveller,
            That is not half his Work, for then he must begin to mannage his
Colours, it being particularly by them, that he is to express the greatness of his Art. ’Tis they that give, as it were, Life and Soul to all that he does ; without them, his Lines will be but Lines that are flat, and without a Body, but the addition of Colours makes that appear round ; and as it were out of the Picture, which else would be plain and dull. ’Tis they that must deceive the Eye, to the degree, to make Flesh appear warm and soft, and to give an Air of Life, so as his Picture may seem almost to Breath and Move. [...] Friend,
            Wherein particularly lies the Art of
Colouring ?
            Traveller.
Beside the Mixture of Colours, such as may answer the Painter’s Aim, it lies in a certain Contention, as I may call it, between the Light and the Shades, which by the means of Colours, are brought to Unite with each other ; and so to give that Roundness to the Figures, which the Italians call Relievo, and for which we have no other Name : In this, if the Shadows are too strong, the Piece is harsh and hard, if too weak, and there be too much Light, ’tis flat. I, for my part, should like a Colouring rather something Brown, but clear, than a bright gay one : But particularly, I think, that those fine Coral Lips, and Cherry Cheeks, are to be Banished, as being far from Flesh and Blood. ’Tis true, the Skins, or Complexions must vary, according to the Age and Sex of the Person ; An Old Woman requiring another Colouring than a fresh Young one. But the Painters must particularly take Care, that there be nothing harsh to offend the Eye, as that neither the Contours, or Out-Lines, be too strongly Terminated, nor the Shadows too hard, nor such Colours placed by one another as do not agree. 
           
Friend,
Is there any Rule for that ?
           
Traveller,
Some Observations there are, as those Figures which are placed on the foremost Ground, or next the Eye, ought to have the greatest Strength, both in their Lights and Shadows, and Cloathed with a lively Drapery ; Observing, that as they lessen by distance, and are behind, to give both the Flesh and the Drapery more faint and obscure Colouring. And this is called an Union in Painting, which makes up an Harmony to the Eye, and causes the Whole to appear one, and not two or three Pictures
.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
L’ARTISTE → règles et préceptes
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

Friend.
            I have heard, that in some Pictures of Raphael, the very Gloss of Damask, and the Softness of Velvet, with the Lustre of Gold, are so Expressed, that you would take them to be Real, and not Painted : Is not that as hard to do, as to imitate Flesh ?
                        Traveller.
            No : Because those things are but the stil Life, whereas there is a Spirit in Flesh and Blood, which is hard to Represent. But a good Painter must know how to do those Things you mention, and many more : As for Example, He must know how to Imitate the Darkness of Night, the Brightness of Day, the Shining and Glittering of Armour ; the Greenness of Trees, the Dryness of Rocks. In a word, All Fruits, Flowers, Animals, Buildings, so as that they all appear
Natural and Pleasing to the Eye. And he must not think as some do, that the force of Colouring consists in imploying of fine Colours, as fine lacks Ultra Marine Greens, &c. For these indeed, are fine before they are wrought, but the Painter’s Skill is to work them judiciously, and with convenience to his Subject.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

Quotation

Giorgione was of the School of Venice, and the first that followed the Modern Tuscan way ; for having by chance seen some things of Leonardo da Vinci, with that new way of strong Shadows, it pleased him so much, that he followed it all his Life time, and imitated it prefectly in all his Oyl Paintings : he drew all after the Life, and had an excellent Colouring ; by which means he gave a Spirit to all he did ; which had not been seen in any Lombard Painter before him.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

Traveller.
           
I must then repeat to you what I told you at our first Meeting [ndr : Dialogue I, « Explaining the Art of Painting »] ; which is, That the Art of Painting has three Parts ; which are, Design, Colouring, and Invention ; and under this third, is that which we call Disposition ; which is properly the Order in which all the Parts of the Story are disposed, so as to produce one effect according to the Design of the Painter ; and that is the first Effect which a good Piece of History is to produce in the Spectator ; that is, if it be a Picture of a joyful Event, that all that is in it be Gay and Smiling, to the very Landskips, Houses, Heavens, Cloaths, &c. And that all the Aptitudes tend to Mirth. The same, if the Story be Sad, or Solemn ; and so for the rest. And a Piece that does not do this at first sight, is most certainly faulty though it never so well Designed, or never so well Coloured ; nay, though there be Learning and Invention in it ; for as a Play that is designed to make me Laugh, is most certainly an ill one if it makes me Cry. So an Historical Piece that doth not produce the Effect it is designed for, cannot pretend to an Excellency, though it be never so finely Painted.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → sujet et choix
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la peinture

Quotation

Friend.
 
            What is properly the Colouring of a Piece of Painting ?
 
                        Traveller.
 
           
It is the Art of employing the Colours proper to the Subject, with a regard to the Lights and Shadows that are incident to the Story, either according to the Truth of it, or to the Painter’s Invention : and out of the Management of these comes all the Strength, Relievo, and Roundness that the Figures have : ’tis hard to give Positive Rules here, it depending much on Practice ; but the most General is, so to manage your Colours, Lights, and Shadows, that the Bodies enlightned may appear by the Opposition of your Shadows ; which by that means may make the Eye rest with Pleasure upon them ; and also, that there be an imperceptible passage from your Shadows to your Lights.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → lumière
CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → convenance, bienséance

Quotation

Chap. VI, Of Garments of several colours, and of their proper Colouring.
The next thing I shall speak of, shall be of
Drapery or Garments, and the true and proper manner of Colouring of them.
And
1. For a Red Garment.
For a light-red Garment, first dead-colour it with Vermilion, and when you would finish it, glaze it over with Lake, and heighten it with White.
For a Scarlet.
[…]
For a Crimson Velvet.
[…]
For a sad Red.
[…]
2.
For Green Garments.
The best Green for holding, is Bise and Pink, heighten it with Masticote, and deepen it with Indico and Pink.
For Green Velvet.
[…].
3.
For Blew Garments.
Take Indico and White, first lay the White in its due places, and then your mean colour, namely Indico and White mixed in their due places, then deepen it with Indico only, […].
4. For
Yellow Garments.
For a Yellow Garment, Masticote, yellow Oker, and Umber ; lay the dead colour of Masticote and White in the lightest places, Oker and White in the mean places, and Umber in the darkest places ; when it is dry glaze it with Pink. […].
5.
For Black Garments.
Let the dead colour be Lamp-black, and some Verdigrease ; when that is dry, go over it with Ivory-black and Verdigrease ; before you go over it the second time, heighten it with White.
6.
For Purple Garments.
Oyl Smalt, tempered with Lake and White-Lead, heighten it with White Lead.
7.
Orange Colour.
Red-Lead and Lake, lay the lightest parts of all with Red-Lead and White, the mean parts with Red-Lead alone, the deeper parts with Lake, if need require heighten it with White.
8.
Hair Colour.
Umber and White for the ground, Umber and Black for the deeper shadows, Umber and
English Oker for mean shadows, for heightning White with a little English Oker.

Conceptual field(s)

L’HISTOIRE ET LA FIGURE → vêtements et plis
MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → couleurs

Quotation

OF WASHING or COLOURING OF Maps, and Printed Pictures.
The Fifth Book.

Uo Wash
Maps or Printed Pictures is nothing else but to set them out in their proper Colours, which to perform well is a very fine thing. I have seen a Printed Picture printed upon fine Parchment, only washed with Water-colours, which could hardly be distinguished from a Limned piece ; and there are many now in England very excellent at it. If any ingenious spirit that delights in Picture, and hath not time or opportunity to study to be a proficient in Painting in Oyl or Limning, I would advise him to practice this, which is very delightful, and quickly attained ; the manner of performing of it I shall here in this Book teach.

Conceptual field(s)

MATERIALITE DE L’ŒUVRE → technique de la peinture

Quotation

After you have attain’d to a Mastership in Draught, [...] ; you may begin the great Mistery of Colouring.
            And first begin in two Colours as
White and Umber &c. after good Draughts or Prints : which you may do in this manner.
[...].
            First with a large Pencel lay on the lightest parts of the Forehead, Balls of the upper Cheeks, [...] then the lightest shaddows on the Forehead, under the Eyes [...] and so till you come down to the Darkest : taking care to leave no edges about the Eye-lids, Lips,
&c. Observing to keep your Pencels for the same degree of Colouring, [...].
            Thus when you have copyd some time in
Two Colours, having obtaind some freedom in Pencelling by a light but steady hand : observing carefull all the Muscles and other Remarks : working all in with much Softness ; [...].

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
L’ARTISTE → apprentissage

Quotation

However I will here make him [ndr : au lecteur] an Offer of an Abstract of what I take to be those by which a Painter, or Connoisseur, may safely conduct himself, [...] V. The Colouring whether Gay, or Solid, must be Natural, Beautiful, and Clean, and what the Eye is delighted with, in Shaddows as well as Lights, and Middle Tints.

term translated by COLORIS in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 12-13.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur
EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

The Kind of Picture, or Drawing having been consider’d, regard is to be had to the Parts of Painting ; we should see in which of These they excell, and in what Degree.
And these several Parts do not Equally contribute to the Ends of Painting : but (I think) ought to stand in this Order.

Grace and Greatness,
Invention,
Expression,
Composition,
Colouring,
Drawing,
Handling.


The last can only Please ; The next (by which I understand Pure Nature, for the Great, and Gentile Style of Drawing falls into another Part) This also can only Please, Colouring Pleases more ; Composition Pleases at least as much as Colouring, and moreover helps to Instruct, as it makes those Parts that do so more conspicuous ; Expression Pleases, and Instructs Greatly ; the Invention does both in a higher Degree, and Grace, and Greatness above all. Nor is it peculiar to That Story, Fable, or whatever the Subject is, but in General raises our Idea of the Species, gives a most Delightful, Vertuous Pride, and kindles in Noble Minds an Ambition to act up to That Dignity Thus conceived to be in Humane Nature. In the Former Parts the Eye is employ’d, in the Other the Understanding.

term translated by COLORIS in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 24-26.

Conceptual field(s)

SPECTATEUR → perception et regard
PEINTURE, TABLEAU, IMAGE → définition de la peinture
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

Quotation

Gentlemen may do as they please, the following Method [ndr : pour juger un tableau] seems to Me to be the most Natural, Convenient, and Proper.
Before you come so near the Picture to be Consider’d as to look into Particulars, or even to be able to know what the Subject of it is, at least before you take notice of That, Observe the
Tout-ensemble of the Masses, and what Kind of one the Whole makes together. It will be proper at the same Distance to consider the General Colouring ; whether That be Grateful, Chearing, and Delightful to the Eye, or Disagreeable ; Then let the Composition be Examin’d Near, and see the Contrasts, and other Particularities relating to it, and so finish your Observations on That Head. The same Then may be done with respect to the Colouring ;

term translated by COLORIS in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 28-29.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

The Tout-ensemble of the Colouring [ndr : dans le portrait de la comtesse Dowager of Exeter, par Van Dyck] is Extreamly Beautiful ; ‘tis Solemn, but Warm, Mellow, Clean, and Natural ; the Flesh, which is exquisitely good, especially the Face, the Black Habit, the Linnen and Cushion, the Chair of the Crimson Velvet, and the Gold Flower’d Curtain mixt with a little Crimson have an Admirable effect, and would be Perfect were there a Middle Tinct amongst the Black.

term translated by COLORIS in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 32.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs
CONCEPTION DE LA PEINTURE → couleur

Quotation

The Beauty, and Harmony of the Colouring gives Me a great Degree of Pleasure [ndr : dans le portrait de la comtesse Dowager d’Exeter par Van Dyck] ; for tho’ This is Grave and Solid, it has a Beauty not less than what is Bright, and Gay. So much of the Composition as is Good does also much Delight the Eye ; And tho’ the Lady is not Young, nor remarkably Handsome, the Grace, and Greatness that is here represented pleases exceedingly. In a Word, as throughout this whole Picture one sees Instances of an Accurate Hand, and Fine Thought, These must give proportionable Pleasure to so hearty a Lover as I am.

term translated by COLORIS in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 37.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

The Composition is unexceptionable [ndr : dans Poussin, Tancrède et Herminie] : There are innumerable Instances of Beautiful Contrasts ; Of this kind are the several Characters of the Persons, (all which are Excellent in their several kinds) and the several Habits : Tancred is half Naked : Erminia’s Sex distinguishes Her from all the rest ; as Vafrino’s Armour, and Helmet shews Him to be Inferiour to Tancred, (His lying by him) and Argante’s Armour differs from both of them. The various positions of the Limbs in all the Figures are also finely Contrasted, and altogether have a lovely effect ; Nor did I ever see a greater Harmony, nor more Art to produce it in any Picture of what Master soever, whether as to the Easy Gradation from the Principal, to the Subordinate Parts, the Connection of one with another, by the degrees of the Lights, and Shadows, and the Tincts of the Colours.
And These too are Good throughout ; They are not Glaring, as the Subject, and the Time of the Story (which was after Sun-set) requires : Nor is the Colouring like that of
Titian, Corregio, Rubens, or those fine Colourists, But ‘tis Warm, and Mellow, ‘tis Agreeable, and of a Taste which none but a Great Man could fall into : And without considering it as a Story, or the Imitation of any thing in Nature the Tout-ensemble of the Colours is a Beautiful, and Delightful Object.

term translated by COLORIS in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 51-52.

Conceptual field(s)

EFFET PICTURAL → qualité des couleurs

Quotation

Of EXPRESSION
Whatever the general Character of the Story is, the Picture must discover it throughout, whether it be Joyous, Melancholy, Grave, Terrible, &c. The Nativity, Resurrection, and Ascension ought to have the General Colouring, the Ornaments, Background, and every thing in them Riant, and Joyous, and the contrary in a Crucifixion, Interment, or a Pietà. [The Blessed Virgin with the dead Christ].
But a Distinction must be made between Grave, and Melancholy, as in a Holy Family (of
Rafaëlle’s Design at least) which I have, and has been mention’d already ; the Colouring is Brown, and Solemn, but yet all together the Picture has not a Dismal Air, but quite otherwise. […] There are certain Sentiments of Awe, and Devotion which ought to be rais’d by the first Sight of Pictures of that Subject, which that Solemn Colouring contributes very much to, but not the more Bright, though upon other Occasions preferable.
I have seen a fine Instance of a Colouring proper for Melancholy Subjects in a Pietà of Van-Dyck : That alone would make one not only Grave, but sad at first Sight ; And a Colour’d Drawing that I have of the Fall of Phaëton after Giulio Romano, shews how much This contributes to the Expression. ‘Tis different from any Colouring that ever I saw, and admirably adapted to the Subject, there is a Reddish Purple Tinct spread throughout, as if the World was all invelopp’d in Smould’ring Fire.