BY THE LIFE (expr.)

DAL VIVO (ita.) · D'APRÈS LA VIE (fra.)
TERM USED AS TRANSLATIONS IN QUOTATION
NATUREL (fra.)
TERM USED IN EARLY TRANSLATIONS
D'APRÈS LE NATUREL (fra.) · D'APRÈS NATURE (fra.)
SWAN, Claudia, « Ad vivum, naer het leven, from the life: defining a Mode of Representation », Word & Image, 11/4, 1995, p. 353-372.

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CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

LINKED QUOTATIONS

3 sources
4 quotations

Quotation

The Order to be observed in drawing by the life.


{
The Order of drawing first sitting.} First you must only dead colour the Face, as the Oyl-painters do, and not meddle with the rest, and this first sitting commonly takes up two hours.
{
Second sitting.} The second sitting will require Four or Five hours, in that time you are to go over the Face very curiously, […]. 
{
Third sitting.} The third sitting commonly takes up two or three hours, and is spent in closing what was before left imperfect and rough, […].

Conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait

Quotation

But wheras in History the Figures have dependency on each other, a Figure by the Life (one Figure usually making the Picture) be only agreeable to it self,
            We must Consider (by divers Tryals) what
Position of Body, Action and Light best becoms the Person, and when any thing seems forcd or affected, we must Endeavour to divert them by Discours, &c.
[...].

Conceptual field(s)

GENRES PICTURAUX → portrait

Quotation

The Goût is a mixture of Poussin’s usual Manner [ndr : il s’agit ici du Tancrède et Herminie, réalisé par Poussin], and (what is very rare) a great deal of Guilio, particulary in the Head, and Attitude of the Lady, and both the Horses ; Tancred is naked to the Wast having been stripp’d by Erminia and his ’Squire to search for his Wounds, he has a piece of loose Drapery which is Yellow, bearing upon the Red in the Middle Tincts, and Shadows, this is thrown over his Belly, and Thighs, and lyes a good length upon the ground ; ’twas doubtless painted by the Life, and is intirely of a Modern Taste. And that nothing might be shocking, or disagreeable, the wounds are much hid, nor is his Body, or Garment stain’d with Blood, only some appears here, and there upon the ground just below the Drapery, as if it flow’d from some Wounds which That cover’d ;

term translated by D'APRÈS LE NATUREL in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 44-45.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai

Quotation

ALL that is done in Picture is done by Invention ; Or from the Life ; Or from another Picture ; Or Lastly ‘tis a Composition of One, or More of these.
The term Picture I here understand at large as signifying a Painting, Drawing, Graving, &c.

Perhaps nothing that is done is Properly, and Strictly Invention, but derived from somthing already seen, tho’ somtimes Compounded, and jumbled into Forms which Nature never produced : These Images laid up in our Minds are the Patterns by which we Work when we do what is said to be done by Invention ; just as when follow Nature before our eyes, the only difference being that in the Latter case these Ideas are fresh taken in, and immediately made use of, in the other they have been reposited there, and are less Clear, and Lively.

So That is said to be done by the Life which is done the thing intended to be represented being set before us, tho’ we neither follow it Intirely, nor intend so to do, but Add, or Retrench by the help of preconceiv’d Ideas of a Beauty, and Perfection we imagine Nature is capable of, tho’ ‘tis Rarely, or Never found.
We [ndr : présence du déterminant « a » à cet endroit du texte, mais est à supprimer, voir l’errata au début de l’ouvrage] say a Picture is done by the Life as well when the Object represented is a thing Inanimate, as when ‘tis an Animal ; and the work of Art, as well as Nature ; But then for Distinction the term Still-Life is made use of as occasion requires.

term translated by D'APRÈS NATURE in RICHARDSON, Jonathan, Traité de la Peinture, Par Mr. Richardson, le Père, Tomes I. et II. Contenant, Tome I. Un Essai sur la Théorie de la Peinture ; Tome II. Un Essai sur l'art de critiquer, en fait de Peinture ; & un Discours sur la Sience d'un Connoisseur. Traduit de l'Anglois; Revu & Corrigé par l'Auteur., trad. par RUTGERS, Antoine, Amsterdam, Herman Uytwerf, 1728, 2 vol., vol. I., p. 90-91.

Conceptual field(s)

CONCEPTS ESTHETIQUES → nature, imitation et vrai