IL CORREGGIO (Antonio Allegri)

ISNI:0000000435248540 Getty:500006208

Quotation

Antoine * de Corregio peintre trés agreable, dont on voit à Parme des morceaux de si rare beauté, qu’il semble qu’on ne peut desirer rien au dessus. Il est vrai qu’il reussit beaucoup mieux dans le coloris, que dans le dessein.
 
* Antoine Lieto, il n’etoit pas de Corregio mais d’un petit village tout auprès, ou par curiosité j’ai eté.

Quotation

The Composition is unexceptionable [ndr : dans Poussin, Tancrède et Herminie] : There are innumerable Instances of Beautiful Contrasts ; Of this kind are the several Characters of the Persons, (all which are Excellent in their several kinds) and the several Habits : Tancred is half Naked : Erminia’s Sex distinguishes Her from all the rest ; as Vafrino’s Armour, and Helmet shews Him to be Inferiour to Tancred, (His lying by him) and Argante’s Armour differs from both of them. The various positions of the Limbs in all the Figures are also finely Contrasted, and altogether have a lovely effect ; Nor did I ever see a greater Harmony, nor more Art to produce it in any Picture of what Master soever, whether as to the Easy Gradation from the Principal, to the Subordinate Parts, the Connection of one with another, by the degrees of the Lights, and Shadows, and the Tincts of the Colours.
And These too are Good throughout ; They are not Glaring, as the Subject, and the Time of the Story (which was after Sun-set) requires : Nor is the Colouring like that of
Titian, Corregio, Rubens, or those fine Colourists, But ‘tis Warm, and Mellow, ‘tis Agreeable, and of a Taste which none but a Great Man could fall into : And without considering it as a Story, or the Imitation of any thing in Nature the Tout-ensemble of the Colours is a Beautiful, and Delightful Object.

Quotation

L’Elégance en general est une maniere de dire ou de faire les choses avec choix, avec politesse, & avec agrément ; avec choix, en se mettant audessus de ce que la Nature & les Peintres font ordinairement ; avec politesse, en donnant un tour à la chose, lequel frappe les gens d’un esprit délicat ; & avec agrément en répandant en general un assaisonnement qui soit au goût & à la portée de tout le monde.
L’Elégance n’est pas toujours fondée sur la correction, […] comme dans le Correge, où malgré les fautes contre la justesse du Dessein, l’Elégance se fait admirer dans le goût du Dessein même, dans le tour que ce Peintre donne aux actions, en un mot, le Correge sort rarement de l’Elégance.

Quotation

{Process mit den Nacht Stucken/ bey Feuer und Liecht} Wann man eine Historie bey Nacht vorstellen will/ so mache man ein großes hell-brennendes Feuer/ dessen Schein weit um sich leuchte/ und sehe von denen umstehenden Sachen ab/ wie sie natürlich von der Feuerfarbe/ je näher je röhter/ participiren und sich gestalten. {Farbe des Feuers.} Dann das Feuer ist ganz rötlich/ als von Liecht-BleyGelb/ Weiß und Mennig gemischet: und also müßen auch die Dinge/ die dasselbe beleuchtet/ entbildet werden. Je weiter aber die Sachen von dem Feuer sich entfernen/ je mehr müßen sie von dessen Schein/ und nach und nach sich in schwarz- und finsterer Nacht-Farbe verlieren.
{Wie den Nacht-Figuren/ die Farbe} Die Figuren/ so vor dem Feuer stehen/ sollen dunkel und schwarz aus dessen Liechte herfür spielen: weil sie vom Dunkel der Nacht/ und nicht vom Feuer/ ihren Ursprung bekommen. Die Bilder aber/ so zur Seiten stehen/ sollen halb dunkel und halb feurig oder rötlich seyn. Welche aber von dem Feuer gesehen werden/ die müßen ganz rötlich/von der Flammen reflexion oder Gegenspielung/ auf einem braunen dunklen Feld/ erleuchtet stehen.
{und action oder Gebärden/ zu geben}. Was aber ihre [ndr.der Figuren] actiones, Gestalt und Stellung betrifft/ so können die/ so in der Nähe beym Feuer sind/ also vorgestellet werden/ daß sie die Mäntel vorschlagen/ die Hände vor das Angesicht halten/ oder solche abwenden/ als wann sie die Hitze des Feuers vermeiden wolten. Die aber in der Ferne stehen/ können ihre Augen mit den Händen reiben/ als ob ihnen der Rauch oder Flammen-Schein überlästig wäre. Andere mehr Stellungen/ wird dem vernünftigen Mahler die Natur und das Leben an die hand geben.

Quotation

{Die Farben müßen jedem Bild seine Natur geben} Wann man aber den Alten/in einen Winkel/ mit einem gelben/ braunen/ oder von Sonne und Staub erschwärzten vernebelten Angesicht/vorstellet/ gegenüber einen jungen Verliebten/ mit seiner Dame, ganz schön/ licht/ feuring und brennend/ bald weiß/ bald roht/ conversiren/ auch die Kinder schön weiß und röhtlich machet: wird solche uneinige Misculanz, bald eine einige liebliche Concordanz auf dem Kunst-Blat gebähren/ und die niedere/ bleiche und dunkele/ der hellen/ feurigen und hochtrabenden Farbe erst ein Preis-volles ansehen und folgbar dem Künstler alle Ehre/ erwerben […].

Quotation

Now the Painter expresseth two things with his colour : First the colour of the thing, whether it be artificial or natural, which he doth with the like colour, as the colour of a blew garment with artificial blew, or the green colour of a Tree with the like green : Secondly he expresseth the light of the Sun, or any other bright Body apt to lighten or manifest the colours, and because colour cannot be seen without light, being nothing else (as the Philosophers teach) but the extream Superficies of a dark untransparent Body lightned, I hold it expedient for him that will prove exquisite in the use thereof, to be most diligent in searching out the effects of light, when it enlightneth colour, which who so doth seriously consider, shall express all those effects with an admirable Grace ; […].
Now when the
Painter would imitate this blew thus lightned, he shall take his artificial blew colour, counterfeiting therewith the blew of the garment, but when he would express the light, wherewith the blew seems clearer, he must mix so much white with his blew, as he findeth light in that part of the garment, where the light striketh with greater force, considering afterwards the other part of the garment, where there is not so much light, and shall mingle less white with his blew proportionably, and so shall he proceed with the like discretion in all the other parts : and where the light falleth not so vehemently, but only by reflexion there he shall mix so much shadow with his blew, as shall seem sufficient to represent that light, loosing it self as it were by degrees, provided alwayes, that where the light is less darkned, there he place his shadow,
In which judicious expressing of the effects of light together with the
colours, Raphael Urbine, Leonard Vincent, Antonius de Coreggio and Titian were most admirable, handling them with so great discretion and judgement, that their Pictures seemed rather natural, then artificial ; the reason whereof the vulgar Eye cannot conceive, notwithstanding these excellent Masters expressed their chiefest art therein, considering with themselves that the light falling upon the flesh caused these and such like effects, in which kind Titan excelled the rest, who as well to shew his great Skill therein, as to merit commendation, used to cozen and deceive Mens Eyes, […].

Quotation

Mathématiques.

Quotation

ATTRAPER, atteindre, saisir, exprimer. Ce Peintre attrape bien les ressemblances, les caractéres ; il attrape la manière du Correge.

Quotation

Et quoy qu’il ne fust pas tout-à-fait correcte dans son dessein, il y a neanmoins de la force & de la noblesse dans tout ce qu’il a fait. S’il [ndr : Le Corrège] fust sorti de son pays et qu’il eust esté à Rome, dont l’Ecole estoit beaucoup plus excellente pour le dessein que celle de Lombardie, on ne doute pas qu’il ne se fust formé une maniere qui l’auroit rendu égal à tous les plus grands Peintres de ces temps-là, puis que sans avoir veu ces belles Antiques de Rome, ny profité des exemples que les autres Peintres ont eus, il s’est tellement perfectionné dans son Art, que personne depuis luy n’a si bien peint, ny donné à ses figures tant de rondeur, tant de force, & tant de cette beauté que les Italiens appellent morbidezza, qu’il y en a dans les Peintures qu’il a faites.

Quotation

He that would rise to the Sublime must form an Idea of Something beyond all we have yet seen ; or which Art, or Nature has yet produc’d ; Painting, Such as when all the Excellencies of the several Masters are United, and their several Defects avoided.
The greatest Designers among the Moderns want much of that exquisite Beauty, in all the Several Characters, that is to be seen in the Antique ; the Airs of the Heads, even of
Rafaëlle himself, are Inferiour to what the Ancients have done ; and for Grace to some of Guido : the Colouring of Rubens and Van Dyck falls short of That of Titian, and Coreggio ; and the best Masters have Rarely Thought like Rafaëlle, or Compos’d like Rembrandt. Let us then imagine a Picture Design’d as the Laocoon, the Hercules, the Apollo, the Venus, or any of these Miraculous remains of Antiquity : The Airs of Heads like what is to be found in the Statues, Busts, Bas-releifs, or Medals, or like some of those of Guido ; and Colour’d like the most Celebrated Colourists ; with the Lightest Pencil, and the most Proper to the Subject ; and all this Suitably Invented, and Compos’d ; Here would be a Picture ! Such a one a Painter should Imagine, and So set before him for Imitation.
Nor must he stop Here, but Create an Original Idea of Perfection. The Utmost that the Best Masters have done, is not to be suppos’d the Utmost ‘tis possible for Humane Nature to arrive at ;

Quotation

De tous ces differents meslanges de couleurs s’engendre cette multitude de differentes teintes qui se rencontrent dans les tableaux, sans lesquelles le Peintre ne peut bien imiter, ny les carnations, ny les draperies, ny generallement toutes les autres choses qu’il veut representer. Et comme il doit faire le meslange de ses teintes sur sa palette ou sur son tableau selon les couleurs qui luy paroissent dans le naturel, il faut qu’il soit extraordinairement soigneux d’observer dans la Nature de quelle maniere elles y paroissent : c’est à dire qu’il doit, en considerant les corps des hommes, regarder de quelle façon ils sont colorez ; quelles parties sont plus vives, & quelles parties sont plus claires ; celles qui sont plus rouges & celles qui ont une apparence un peu bluastre, comme sont d’ordinaire les chairs plus délicates ; & prendre bien garde comment toutes ces differentes couleurs s’unissent & se meslent si bien ensemble, qu’il semble qu’une infinité de diverses teintes ne fassent qu’une seule couleur.
Quand un Peintre sçait mesler ses couleurs, les lier & noyer tendrement, on appelle cela bien peindre ; C’est la partie qu’avoit le Corege, comme je vous ay dit assez de fois, & ce beau meslange de couleurs non seulement se doit faire dans les superficies égales en clarté, mais encore dans la jonction ou nouëment des parties claires avec les brunes.

Quotation

{Process mit den Nacht Stucken/ bey Feuer und Liecht} Wann man eine Historie bey Nacht vorstellen will/ so mache man ein großes hell-brennendes Feuer/ dessen Schein weit um sich leuchte/ und sehe von denen umstehenden Sachen ab/ wie sie natürlich von der Feuerfarbe/ je näher je röhter/ participiren und sich gestalten. {Farbe des Feuers.} Dann das Feuer ist ganz rötlich/ als von Liecht-BleyGelb/ Weiß und Mennig gemischet: und also müßen auch die Dinge/ die dasselbe beleuchtet/ entbildet werden. Je weiter aber die Sachen von dem Feuer sich entfernen/ je mehr müßen sie von dessen Schein/ und nach und nach sich in schwarz- und finsterer Nacht-Farbe verlieren.
{Wie den Nacht-Figuren/ die Farbe} Die Figuren/ so vor dem Feuer stehen/ sollen dunkel und schwarz aus dessen Liechte herfür spielen: weil sie vom Dunkel der Nacht/ und nicht vom Feuer/ ihren Ursprung bekommen. Die Bilder aber/ so zur Seiten stehen/ sollen halb dunkel und halb feurig oder rötlich seyn. Welche aber von dem Feuer gesehen werden/ die müßen ganz rötlich/von der Flammen reflexion oder Gegenspielung/ auf einem braunen dunklen Feld/ erleuchtet stehen.
{und action oder Gebärden/ zu geben}. Was aber ihre [ndr.der Figuren] actiones, Gestalt und Stellung betrifft/ so können die/ so in der Nähe beym Feuer sind/ also vorgestellet werden/ daß sie die Mäntel vorschlagen/ die Hände vor das Angesicht halten/ oder solche abwenden/ als wann sie die Hitze des Feuers vermeiden wolten. Die aber in der Ferne stehen/ können ihre Augen mit den Händen reiben/ als ob ihnen der Rauch oder Flammen-Schein überlästig wäre. Andere mehr Stellungen/ wird dem vernünftigen Mahler die Natur und das Leben an die hand geben.

Quotation

[....] La Place estoit ornée tout au tour de Statuës, que les Cabalistes avoient fait ériger à leurs Princes, entre lesquelles celle de Michelange occupoit le premier lieu, accompagné de celles du Titien, du Georgion, de Paul Veronese, du Tintoret, des Bassans, du Correge, du Guide, de Rubens, Vandick, Zuccaro, Lanfranc, Joseph Pin, Maistre Rousse, Saint Martin, Ribera, Pietre Teste, Freminet, Tempeste, Blœmaret, P. ….. V ….. B. …. V. … &c toutes posées sur leurs piedestaux, avec chacune une Inscription à leur loüange.
On ne voyait là ny les Apelles, ny les Timanthes, ny les Raphaëls, ny les Poussins, ny les Leonards de Vincy, ny les Jules Romains, ny les autres de ce merite, dont on ne se doit pas étonner, veu qu’ayans tous esté les Antagonistes de ces faux Peintres, les Cabalistes n’avoient garde de leur donner place parmi ceux dont ils ont méprisé les ouvrages & les maximes.

Quotation

L’Elégance en general est une maniere de dire ou de faire les choses avec choix, avec politesse, & avec agrément ; avec choix, en se mettant audessus de ce que la Nature & les Peintres font ordinairement ; avec politesse, en donnant un tour à la chose, lequel frappe les gens d’un esprit délicat ; & avec agrément en répandant en general un assaisonnement qui soit au goût & à la portée de tout le monde.
L’Elégance n’est pas toujours fondée sur la correction, […] comme dans le Correge, où malgré les fautes contre la justesse du Dessein, l’Elégance se fait admirer dans le goût du Dessein même, dans le tour que ce Peintre donne aux actions, en un mot, le Correge sort rarement de l’Elégance.

Quotation

Les Lombards […]
Paroissent absolus pour le grand Coloris,
Leur pinceau franc et net d’une force discrette
Charme nostre intellect par sa vertu secrette,
Icy le Ticien et l’Illustre d’Urbin
Font paroistre l’esclat de leur stille divin.
{7. Correge Peintre autant excellant qu’infortuné.}
Mais sans les offenser, celuy qui sous la rouë
De l’aveugle deesse accable de la bouë
A peine peut hausser et sa teste et ses mains
Surmonta les Lombards et ravit les Romains :
[…]
Correge corrigeant tous les deffauts des corps
Obligea la nature à de pareils efforts,
Nature le Cœur gros de dépit et de honte
De voir qu’un seul mortel ses ouvrages surmonte

Quotation

LE COLORIS n’est autre chose que les couleurs employées, considérées dans leur totalité. 
Tout l’artifice du
coloris, consiste à imiter les couleurs apparentes des objets naturels, & à donner aux objets artificiels la couleur la plus avantageuse, & la plus propre pour tromper la vûe. De Piles
COLORIs précieux.
COLORIS fier : fierté de
coloris.
COLORIS qui sent la farine.
Voyez FARINE.
LE COLORIS du
Titien du Corrége.

Quotation

Now the Painter expresseth two things with his colour : First the colour of the thing, whether it be artificial or natural, which he doth with the like colour, as the colour of a blew garment with artificial blew, or the green colour of a Tree with the like green : Secondly he expresseth the light of the Sun, or any other bright Body apt to lighten or manifest the colours, and because colour cannot be seen without light, being nothing else (as the Philosophers teach) but the extream Superficies of a dark untransparent Body lightned, I hold it expedient for him that will prove exquisite in the use thereof, to be most diligent in searching out the effects of light, when it enlightneth colour, which who so doth seriously consider, shall express all those effects with an admirable Grace ; […].
Now when the
Painter would imitate this blew thus lightned, he shall take his artificial blew colour, counterfeiting therewith the blew of the garment, but when he would express the light, wherewith the blew seems clearer, he must mix so much white with his blew, as he findeth light in that part of the garment, where the light striketh with greater force, considering afterwards the other part of the garment, where there is not so much light, and shall mingle less white with his blew proportionably, and so shall he proceed with the like discretion in all the other parts : and where the light falleth not so vehemently, but only by reflexion there he shall mix so much shadow with his blew, as shall seem sufficient to represent that light, loosing it self as it were by degrees, provided alwayes, that where the light is less darkned, there he place his shadow,
In which judicious expressing of the effects of light together with the
colours, Raphael Urbine, Leonard Vincent, Antonius de Coreggio and Titian were most admirable, handling them with so great discretion and judgement, that their Pictures seemed rather natural, then artificial ; the reason whereof the vulgar Eye cannot conceive, notwithstanding these excellent Masters expressed their chiefest art therein, considering with themselves that the light falling upon the flesh caused these and such like effects, in which kind Titan excelled the rest, who as well to shew his great Skill therein, as to merit commendation, used to cozen and deceive Mens Eyes, […].

Quotation

The Best that can be done is to Advise one that would know the Beauty of Colouring, To observe Nature, and how the best Colourists have imitated her.
What a Lightness, Thinness, and Transparency ; What a Warmth, Cleanness, and Delicacy is to be seen in Life, and in good Pictures !
He that would be a good Colourist himself must moreover Practice much after, and for a considerable time accustom himself to See well-colour’d Pictures only : But even This will be in vain, unless he has a Good Eye in the Sense, as one is said to have a Good Ear for Musick ; he must not only See well, but have a particular Delicacy with relation to the Beauty of Colours, and the infinite Variety of Tincts.

The
Venetian, Lombard and Flemish Schools have excell’d in Colouring ; the Florentine, and Roman in Design ; the Bolognese Masters in both ; but not to the Degree generally as either of the other. Corregio, Titian, Paolo Veronese, Rubens, and Van Dyck, have been admirable Colourists ; the latter in his best things has follow’d common Nature extreamly close.

Quotation

The Best that can be done is to Advise one that would know the Beauty of Colouring, To observe Nature, and how the best Colourists have imitated her.
What a Lightness, Thinness, and Transparency ; What a Warmth, Cleanness, and Delicacy is to be seen in Life, and in good Pictures !
He that would be a good Colourist himself must moreover Practice much after, and for a considerable time accustom himself to See well-colour’d Pictures only : But even This will be in vain, unless he has a Good Eye in the Sense, as one is said to have a Good Ear for Musick ; he must not only See well, but have a particular Delicacy with relation to the Beauty of Colours, and the infinite Variety of Tincts.

The
Venetian, Lombard and Flemish Schools have excell’d in Colouring ; the Florentine, and Roman in Design ; the Bolognese Masters in both ; but not to the Degree generally as either of the other. Corregio, Titian, Paolo Veronese, Rubens, and Van Dyck, have been admirable Colourists ; the latter in his best things has follow’d common Nature extreamly close.

Quotation

The Composition is unexceptionable [ndr : dans Poussin, Tancrède et Herminie] : There are innumerable Instances of Beautiful Contrasts ; Of this kind are the several Characters of the Persons, (all which are Excellent in their several kinds) and the several Habits : Tancred is half Naked : Erminia’s Sex distinguishes Her from all the rest ; as Vafrino’s Armour, and Helmet shews Him to be Inferiour to Tancred, (His lying by him) and Argante’s Armour differs from both of them. The various positions of the Limbs in all the Figures are also finely Contrasted, and altogether have a lovely effect ; Nor did I ever see a greater Harmony, nor more Art to produce it in any Picture of what Master soever, whether as to the Easy Gradation from the Principal, to the Subordinate Parts, the Connection of one with another, by the degrees of the Lights, and Shadows, and the Tincts of the Colours.
And These too are Good throughout ; They are not Glaring, as the Subject, and the Time of the Story (which was after Sun-set) requires : Nor is the Colouring like that of
Titian, Corregio, Rubens, or those fine Colourists, But ‘tis Warm, and Mellow, ‘tis Agreeable, and of a Taste which none but a Great Man could fall into : And without considering it as a Story, or the Imitation of any thing in Nature the Tout-ensemble of the Colours is a Beautiful, and Delightful Object.

Quotation

Quand un Peintre sçait mesler ses couleurs, les lier & noyer tendrement, on appelle cela bien peindre ; C’est la partie qu’avoit le Corege, comme je vous ay dit assez de fois, & ce beau meslange de couleurs non seulement se doit faire dans les superficies égales en clarté, mais encore dans la jonction ou nouëment des parties claires avec les brunes.
Ce nouëment, interrompit Pymandre, & ce meslange de couleurs qui se fait avec tendresse, est-ce point ce que Pline appelle
commissura & transitus colorum ? Et ce qu’Ovide entend lors qu’il parle des couleurs de l’arc-en-ciel, quand il dit :
In quo diversiniteant cum mille colores,
Transitus ipse tamen spectantia lumina fallit,
Usque adeo quod tangit idem & tamen ultima distant. {Ovid. 6. Meth. v. 65.}
Je ne croy pas qu’on puisse mieux exprimer le passage presqu’insensible qui se fait d’une couleur à une autre. Il me souvient que Philostrate traitant de l’education d’Achilles, observe que ce qui paroissoit de plus merveilleux dans la representation de Chiron peint en Centaure, estoit l’assemblage de la Nature humaine avec celle du cheval, que le Peintre avoit si adroitement jointes ensemble, qu’on ne pouvoit connoistre la separation de l’une d’avec l’autre, ny s’apercevoir où elle commençoit, & où elle finissoit.

Les plus beaux exemples qu’un en voye dans la peinture, repartis-je sont dans la Gallerie de Farnese, où  les Caraches ont representé Persée qui change des hommes en pierres : Et dans le Cabinet du Roy, où le Guide a peint le Cantaure Nesse qui enleve Dejanire.

Quotation

Quant au Corege sa maniere est differente de celle du Titien, en ce qu’il n’a pas sceu cette harmonie de couleurs, cette belle conduite de lumieres, & cette fraischeur de teintes si admirable qu’on remarque dans les Tableaux du Titien, où il semble qu’on voye du sang dans ses carnations, tant il les represente naturelles.

Quotation

La plus grande perfection dans la Peinture, luy repartis-je, c'est de faire que toutes les qualitez du corps conviennent à la personne qu'on veut representer, soit dans la force des membres, soit dans la couleur de la chair. Par exemple, une belle femme, ou un jeune homme de condition, doivent avoir le corps blanc, délicat, & gratieux, comme dans le Tableau de Corege, dont je vous ay déja parlé, où il y a un Saint Jean tout nud, qui s'enfuit du Jardin des Olives, & dans celuy du Titien, qui est à l'Hostel de Sourdis, où Venus retient Adonis.

Quotation

La plus grande perfection dans la Peinture, luy repartis-je, c'est de faire que toutes les qualitez du corps conviennent à la personne qu'on veut representer, soit dans la force des membres, soit dans la couleur de la chair. Par exemple, une belle femme, ou un jeune homme de condition, doivent avoir le corps blanc, délicat, & gratieux, comme dans le Tableau de Corege, dont je vous ay déja parlé, où il y a un Saint Jean tout nud, qui s'enfuit du Jardin des Olives, & dans celuy du Titien, qui est à l'Hostel de Sourdis, où Venus retient Adonis. Car si vous remarquez le Coloris de cette Déesse, vous y verrez une grande tendresse, & dans celuy du Chasseur vous y connoistrez comme un homme moins délicat, & qui s'adonne aux exercices penibles, doit avoir la chair plus haute en couleur : Mais un vieillard qui sera representé plus maigre, & plus décharné, doit avoir la chair plus basannée, & plus brune, de mesme qu'un Soldat, & un Marinier, qui sont ordinairement dans le travail, & qui ont le corps nud, & exposé à l'air, & au Soleil : […].

Quotation

L’Elégance en general est une maniere de dire ou de faire les choses avec choix, avec politesse, & avec agrément ; avec choix, en se mettant audessus de ce que la Nature & les Peintres font ordinairement ; avec politesse, en donnant un tour à la chose, lequel frappe les gens d’un esprit délicat ; & avec agrément en répandant en general un assaisonnement qui soit au goût & à la portée de tout le monde.
L’Elégance n’est pas toujours fondée sur la correction, […] comme dans le Correge, où malgré les fautes contre la justesse du Dessein, l’Elégance se fait admirer dans le goût du Dessein même, dans le tour que ce Peintre donne aux actions, en un mot, le Correge sort rarement de l’Elégance.

Quotation

Quant au Corege sa maniere est differente de celle du Titien, en ce qu’il n’a pas sceu cette harmonie de couleurs, cette belle conduite de lumieres, & cette fraischeur de teintes si admirable qu’on remarque dans les Tableaux du Titien, où il semble qu’on voye du sang dans ses carnations, tant il les represente naturelles. Mais en recompense le Corege a eu l’imagination plus forte, & a desseigné d’un goust beaucoup plus grand & plus exquis ; Et quoy qu’il ne fust pas tout-à-fait correcte dans son dessein, il y a neanmoins de la force & de la noblesse dans tout ce qu’il a fait.

Quotation

Les Couleurs à huile ont cela pardessus les autres, que les Teintes s'en peuvent mêler facilement par le manîment du Pinceau : mais il est à craindre aussi qu'à force de les tourmenter on n'en fasse perdre la fraicheur surtout dans les Carnations, & qu'elles ne deviennent sales et terrestres. Pour obvier à cela, il y a deux choses à faire ; la première est de s'accoûtumer à peindre & à mêler ses Couleurs avec promptitude & légèreté de Pinceau, en sorte que, s'il y avoit moyen, l'on ne passât point deux fois sur le même endroit, & la seconde est, qu'après avoir ainsi meslé légèrement ses Couleurs ensemble on prenne le soin de retoucher par-dessus avec des Couleurs vierges & fraîches lesquelles conviennent aux endroits où on le met, & soient de même ton que celles qui auront été déjà peintes & mêlées par dessous. Pour apprendre à peindre de cette sorte je ne sais rien de meilleur que de copier d'après le Corrège & Van Dyck pour la légèreté de pinceau, & d'après Paul Veronese & Rubens pour les Teintes vierges.

Quotation

Je le redis donc encore avec plus de confiance : apprenons à critiquer nos propres ouvrages à la vûë des beautez que nous découvrons dans ceux des autres ; ne rougissons point de chercher à les étudier ; ne craignons point qu’on nous accuse d’être de serviles imitateurs, quand nous aurons l’adresse de nous approprier les parties qui nous manquent, & de les joindre à celles que nous possedons. Le goût de dessein de celui-ci est plus noble & plus délicat que le vôtre, mais votre coloris l’emporte sur le sien ; ne pouvez-vous, sans perdre ce que vous avez acquis dans la couleur, faire votre profit de son heureuse maniere de dessiner ? Raphaël n’a t-il pas ajouté une nouvelle grandeur à la sienne à la vûë des ouvrages de Michel-Ange, sans se dépoüiller de sa sage simplicité & des graces nobles qui le caracterisent. Louis Carrache a-t-il passé pour un plagiaire, pour avoir étudié les tournures naïves & piquantes du Correge ? J’ai entre mes mains des études d’Annibal d’après Raphaël d’une beauté à faire comprendre qu’il étoit déjà digne de sa grande reputation lorsqu’il les a faites. Le Roy possede un Tableau de Vandeik d’après Le Titien, qui n’est point l’ouvrage d’un écolier.

Quotation

Je le redis donc encore avec plus de confiance : apprenons à critiquer nos propres ouvrages à la vûë des beautez que nous découvrons dans ceux des autres ; ne rougissons point de chercher à les étudier ; ne craignons point qu’on nous accuse d’être de serviles imitateurs, quand nous aurons l’adresse de nous approprier les parties qui nous manquent, & de les joindre à celles que nous possedons. Le goût de dessein de celui-ci est plus noble & plus délicat que le vôtre, mais votre coloris l’emporte sur le sien ; ne pouvez-vous, sans perdre ce que vous avez acquis dans la couleur, faire votre profit de son heureuse maniere de dessiner ? Raphaël n’a t-il pas ajouté une nouvelle grandeur à la sienne à la vûë des ouvrages de Michel-Ange, sans se dépoüiller de sa sage simplicité & des graces nobles qui le caracterisent. Louis Carrache a-t-il passé pour un plagiaire, pour avoir étudié les tournures naïves & piquantes du Correge ? J’ai entre mes mains des études d’Annibal d’après Raphaël d’une beauté à faire comprendre qu’il étoit déjà digne de sa grande reputation lorsqu’il les a faites. Le Roy possede un Tableau de Vandeik d’après Le Titien, qui n’est point l’ouvrage d’un écolier.

Quotation

DÉLICAT, DÉLICATESSE, DÉLICATEMENT. 
Un pinceau
délicat. Le Correge étoit un Peintre délicat, ses païsages sont touchés délicatement, il avoit une grande délicatesse d’expression.

Quotation

DÉLICAT, DÉLICATESSE, DÉLICATEMENT. 
Un pinceau
délicat. Le Correge étoit un Peintre délicat, ses païsages sont touchés délicatement, il avoit une grande délicatesse d’expression.

Quotation

C’est répondis-je, que quelque soin qu’on apporte à bien peindre un ouvrage, toutes ses parties estant composées d’une infinité de differentes teintes, qui demeurent toûjours en quelque façon distinctes & separées, ces teintes n’ont garde d’estre meslées ensemble, de la mesme sorte que sont celles des corps naturels. Il est bien vray que quand un tableau est peint dans la derniere perfection, il peut estre consideré dans une moindre distance ; & il a cet avantage de paroistre avec plus de force & de rondeur, comme sont ceux du Corége. C’est pourquoi je vous ay fait remarquer que la grande union & le mélange des couleurs sert beaucoup à donner aux tableaux plus de force & de vérité ; & qu’aussi plus ou moins de distance contribuë infiniment à cette union.

Quotation

Quant au Corege sa maniere est differente de celle du Titien, en ce qu’il n’a pas sceu cette harmonie de couleurs, cette belle conduite de lumieres, & cette fraischeur de teintes si admirable qu’on remarque dans les Tableaux du Titien, où il semble qu’on voye du sang dans ses carnations, tant il les represente naturelles. Mais en recompense le Corege a eu l’imagination plus forte, & a desseigné d’un goust beaucoup plus grand & plus exquis ; Et quoy qu’il ne fust pas tout-à-fait correcte dans son dessein, il y a neanmoins de la force & de la noblesse dans tout ce qu’il a fait. S’il [ndr : Le Corrège] fust sorti de son pays et qu’il eust esté à Rome, dont l’Ecole estoit beaucoup plus excellente pour le dessein que celle de Lombardie, on ne doute pas qu’il ne se fust formé une maniere qui l’auroit rendu égal à tous les plus grands Peintres de ces temps-là, puis que sans avoir veu ces belles Antiques de Rome, ny profité des exemples que les autres Peintres ont eus, il s’est tellement perfectionné dans son Art, que personne depuis luy n’a si bien peint, ny donné à ses figures tant de rondeur, tant de force, & tant de cette beauté que les Italiens appellent morbidezza, qu’il y en a dans les Peintures qu’il a faites.

Quotation

Je le redis donc encore avec plus de confiance : apprenons à critiquer nos propres ouvrages à la vûë des beautez que nous découvrons dans ceux des autres ; ne rougissons point de chercher à les étudier ; ne craignons point qu’on nous accuse d’être de serviles imitateurs, quand nous aurons l’adresse de nous approprier les parties qui nous manquent, & de les joindre à celles que nous possedons. Le goût de dessein de celui-ci est plus noble & plus délicat que le vôtre, mais votre coloris l’emporte sur le sien ; ne pouvez-vous, sans perdre ce que vous avez acquis dans la couleur, faire votre profit de son heureuse maniere de dessiner ? Raphaël n’a t-il pas ajouté une nouvelle grandeur à la sienne à la vûë des ouvrages de Michel-Ange, sans se dépoüiller de sa sage simplicité & des graces nobles qui le caracterisent. Louis Carrache a-t-il passé pour un plagiaire, pour avoir étudié les tournures naïves & piquantes du Correge ? J’ai entre mes mains des études d’Annibal d’après Raphaël d’une beauté à faire comprendre qu’il étoit déjà digne de sa grande reputation lorsqu’il les a faites. Le Roy possede un Tableau de Vandeik d’après Le Titien, qui n’est point l’ouvrage d’un écolier.

Quotation

L’Elégance en general est une maniere de dire ou de faire les choses avec choix, avec politesse, & avec agrément ; avec choix, en se mettant audessus de ce que la Nature & les Peintres font ordinairement ; avec politesse, en donnant un tour à la chose, lequel frappe les gens d’un esprit délicat ; & avec agrément en répandant en general un assaisonnement qui soit au goût & à la portée de tout le monde.
L’Elégance n’est pas toujours fondée sur la correction, […] comme dans le Correge, où malgré les fautes contre la justesse du Dessein, l’Elégance se fait admirer dans le goût du Dessein même, dans le tour que ce Peintre donne aux actions, en un mot, le Correge sort rarement de l’Elégance.

Quotation

Il [ndr : Rembrandt] a si bien placé les teintes & les demi-teintes les unes auprés des autres, & si bien entendu les lumieres & les ombres, que ce qu’il a peint, d’une maniere grossiere, & qui mesme ne semble souvent qu’ébauché, ne laisse pas de réüssir, lors, comme je vous ay dit, qu’on n’en est pas trop prés. Car par l’éloignement, les coups de pinceau fortement donnez, & cette épaisseur de couleurs que vous avez remarquée, diminuënt à la veüë, & se noyant & meslant ensemble, font l’effet qu’on souhaite. La distance qu’on demande pour bien voir un tableau, n’est pas seulement afin que les yeux ayent plus d’espace & plus de commodité pour embrasser les objets et pour les mieux voir ensemble : c’est encore afin qu’il se trouve davantage d’air entre l’œil & l’objet.
Vous voulez dire, interrompit Pymandre, que par le moyen d’une plus grande densité d’air, toutes les couleurs d’un tableau paroissent noyées & comme fonduës, s’il faut me servir de vos termes, les unes avec les autres.

Quotation

It must be consider’d they [ndr : les cartons de Raphaël] were made for Patterns for Tapistry, not profess’d Pictures, and painted, not in Oil, but in Distemper : If therefore one sees not the Warmth, and Mellowness, and Delicacy of Colouring which is to be found in Correggio, Titian, or Rubens, it may fairly be imputed in a great measure to these Causes. A Judicious Painter has other Considerations relating to the Colouring when he makes Patters for Tapistry to be heightned with Gold, and Silver, than when he paints a Picture without such View ; nor can a sort of Dryness, and Harshness be avoided in Distemper, upon Paper : Time moreover has apparently chang’d some of the Colours. In a word, the Tout-Ensemble of the Colours is Agreeable, and Noble ; and the Parts of it are in General Extreamly, but not Superlatively Good.

Quotation

It must be consider’d they [ndr : les cartons de Raphaël] were made for Patterns for Tapistry, not profess’d Pictures, and painted, not in Oil, but in Distemper : If therefore one sees not the Warmth, and Mellowness, and Delicacy of Colouring which is to be found in Correggio, Titian, or Rubens, it may fairly be imputed in a great measure to these Causes. A Judicious Painter has other Considerations relating to the Colouring when he makes Patters for Tapistry to be heightned with Gold, and Silver, than when he paints a Picture without such View ; nor can a sort of Dryness, and Harshness be avoided in Distemper, upon Paper : Time moreover has apparently chang’d some of the Colours. In a word, the Tout-Ensemble of the Colours is Agreeable, and Noble ; and the Parts of it are in General Extreamly, but not Superlatively Good.

Quotation

S’il [ndr : Le Corrège] fust sorti de son pays et qu’il eust esté à Rome, dont l’Ecole estoit beaucoup plus excellente pour le dessein que celle de Lombardie, on ne doute pas qu’il ne se fust formé une maniere qui l’auroit rendu égal à tous les plus grands Peintres de ces temps-là, puis que sans avoir veu ces belles Antiques de Rome, ny profité des exemples que les autres Peintres ont eus, il s’est tellement perfectionné dans son Art, que personne depuis luy n’a si bien peint, ny donné à ses figures tant de rondeur, tant de force, & tant de cette beauté que les Italiens appellent morbidezza, qu’il y en a dans les Peintures qu’il a faites.

Quotation

Le prodige qui arrivoit à Rome, arrivoit en même temps à Venise, à Florence & dans d'autres villes d'Italie. Il y sortoit de dessous terre, pour ainsi dire, des hommes illustres à jamais dans leurs professions, & qui tous valoient mieux que les maîtres qui les avoient enseignez : des hommes sans précurseur, et qui étoient les Eleves de leur propre génie. Venise se vit riche tout-à-coup en Peintres excellens, sans que la République eût fondé depuis peu de nouvelles Academies, ni proposé aux Peintres de nouveaux prix. Les influences heureuses qui se répandoient alors sur la peinture, furent chercher Le Correge dans son Village pour en faire un grand Peintre d'un caractere particulier. Il osa le premier mettre des figures véritablement en l'air, et qui plafonnent, comme disent les Peintres. Raphaël en peignant les Nôces de Psyché sur la voûte du sallon du petit Farnese, a traité son sujet comme s'il étoit peint sur une tapisserie attachée à ce plafond. Le Correge met des figures en l'air dans l'Assomption de la Vierge qu'il peignit dans la coupole de la cathédrale de Parme, & dans l'Ascension de Jesus-Christ qu'il peignit dans la coupole de l'Abbaïe de Saint Jean de la même ville. C'est une chose qui seule pourroit faire reconnoître l'action des causes physiques dans le renouvellement des arts. Toutes les écoles qui se formoient alors, alloient au beau par des routes differentes. Leur maniere ne se ressembloit pas, quoiqu'elles fussent si bonnes qu'on seroit fâché que chaque école n'eût pas suivi la sienne.

Quotation

Now the Painter expresseth two things with his colour : First the colour of the thing, whether it be artificial or natural, which he doth with the like colour, as the colour of a blew garment with artificial blew, or the green colour of a Tree with the like green : Secondly he expresseth the light of the Sun, or any other bright Body apt to lighten or manifest the colours, and because colour cannot be seen without light, being nothing else (as the Philosophers teach) but the extream Superficies of a dark untransparent Body lightned, I hold it expedient for him that will prove exquisite in the use thereof, to be most diligent in searching out the effects of light, when it enlightneth colour, which who so doth seriously consider, shall express all those effects with an admirable Grace ; […].
Now when the
Painter would imitate this blew thus lightned, he shall take his artificial blew colour, counterfeiting therewith the blew of the garment, but when he would express the light, wherewith the blew seems clearer, he must mix so much white with his blew, as he findeth light in that part of the garment, where the light striketh with greater force, considering afterwards the other part of the garment, where there is not so much light, and shall mingle less white with his blew proportionably, and so shall he proceed with the like discretion in all the other parts : and where the light falleth not so vehemently, but only by reflexion there he shall mix so much shadow with his blew, as shall seem sufficient to represent that light, loosing it self as it were by degrees, provided alwayes, that where the light is less darkned, there he place his shadow,
In which judicious expressing of the effects of light together with the
colours, Raphael Urbine, Leonard Vincent, Antonius de Coreggio and Titian were most admirable, handling them with so great discretion and judgement, that their Pictures seemed rather natural, then artificial ; the reason whereof the vulgar Eye cannot conceive, notwithstanding these excellent Masters expressed their chiefest art therein, considering with themselves that the light falling upon the flesh caused these and such like effects, in which kind Titan excelled the rest, who as well to shew his great Skill therein, as to merit commendation, used to cozen and deceive Mens Eyes, […].

Quotation

{Die Farben müßen jedem Bild seine Natur geben} Wann man aber den Alten/in einen Winkel/ mit einem gelben/ braunen/ oder von Sonne und Staub erschwärzten vernebelten Angesicht/vorstellet/ gegenüber einen jungen Verliebten/ mit seiner Dame, ganz schön/ licht/ feuring und brennend/ bald weiß/ bald roht/ conversiren/ auch die Kinder schön weiß und röhtlich machet: wird solche uneinige Misculanz, bald eine einige liebliche Concordanz auf dem Kunst-Blat gebähren/ und die niedere/ bleiche und dunkele/ der hellen/ feurigen und hochtrabenden Farbe erst ein Preis-volles ansehen und folgbar dem Künstler alle Ehre/ erwerben […].

Quotation

L’Elégance en general est une maniere de dire ou de faire les choses avec choix, avec politesse, & avec agrément ; avec choix, en se mettant audessus de ce que la Nature & les Peintres font ordinairement ; avec politesse, en donnant un tour à la chose, lequel frappe les gens d’un esprit délicat ; & avec agrément en répandant en general un assaisonnement qui soit au goût & à la portée de tout le monde.
L’Elégance n’est pas toujours fondée sur la correction, […] comme dans le Correge, où malgré les fautes contre la justesse du Dessein, l’Elégance se fait admirer dans le goût du Dessein même, dans le tour que ce Peintre donne aux actions, en un mot, le Correge sort rarement de l’Elégance.

Quotation

Now the Painter expresseth two things with his colour : First the colour of the thing, whether it be artificial or natural, which he doth with the like colour, as the colour of a blew garment with artificial blew, or the green colour of a Tree with the like green : Secondly he expresseth the light of the Sun, or any other bright Body apt to lighten or manifest the colours, and because colour cannot be seen without light, being nothing else (as the Philosophers teach) but the extream Superficies of a dark untransparent Body lightned, I hold it expedient for him that will prove exquisite in the use thereof, to be most diligent in searching out the effects of light, when it enlightneth colour, which who so doth seriously consider, shall express all those effects with an admirable Grace ; […].
Now when the
Painter would imitate this blew thus lightned, he shall take his artificial blew colour, counterfeiting therewith the blew of the garment, but when he would express the light, wherewith the blew seems clearer, he must mix so much white with his blew, as he findeth light in that part of the garment, where the light striketh with greater force, considering afterwards the other part of the garment, where there is not so much light, and shall mingle less white with his blew proportionably, and so shall he proceed with the like discretion in all the other parts : and where the light falleth not so vehemently, but only by reflexion there he shall mix so much shadow with his blew, as shall seem sufficient to represent that light, loosing it self as it were by degrees, provided alwayes, that where the light is less darkned, there he place his shadow,
In which judicious expressing of the effects of light together with the
colours, Raphael Urbine, Leonard Vincent, Antonius de Coreggio and Titian were most admirable, handling them with so great discretion and judgement, that their Pictures seemed rather natural, then artificial ; the reason whereof the vulgar Eye cannot conceive, notwithstanding these excellent Masters expressed their chiefest art therein, considering with themselves that the light falling upon the flesh caused these and such like effects, in which kind Titan excelled the rest, who as well to shew his great Skill therein, as to merit commendation, used to cozen and deceive Mens Eyes, […].

Quotation

{Die Farben müßen jedem Bild seine Natur geben} Wann man aber den Alten/in einen Winkel/ mit einem gelben/ braunen/ oder von Sonne und Staub erschwärzten vernebelten Angesicht/vorstellet/ gegenüber einen jungen Verliebten/ mit seiner Dame, ganz schön/ licht/ feuring und brennend/ bald weiß/ bald roht/ conversiren/ auch die Kinder schön weiß und röhtlich machet: wird solche uneinige Misculanz, bald eine einige liebliche Concordanz auf dem Kunst-Blat gebähren/ und die niedere/ bleiche und dunkele/ der hellen/ feurigen und hochtrabenden Farbe erst ein Preis-volles ansehen und folgbar dem Künstler alle Ehre/ erwerben […].

Quotation

{Process mit den Nacht Stucken/ bey Feuer und Liecht} Wann man eine Historie bey Nacht vorstellen will/ so mache man ein großes hell-brennendes Feuer/ dessen Schein weit um sich leuchte/ und sehe von denen umstehenden Sachen ab/ wie sie natürlich von der Feuerfarbe/ je näher je röhter/ participiren und sich gestalten. {Farbe des Feuers.} Dann das Feuer ist ganz rötlich/ als von Liecht-BleyGelb/ Weiß und Mennig gemischet: und also müßen auch die Dinge/ die dasselbe beleuchtet/ entbildet werden. Je weiter aber die Sachen von dem Feuer sich entfernen/ je mehr müßen sie von dessen Schein/ und nach und nach sich in schwarz- und finsterer Nacht-Farbe verlieren.
{Wie den Nacht-Figuren/ die Farbe} Die Figuren/ so vor dem Feuer stehen/ sollen dunkel und schwarz aus dessen Liechte herfür spielen: weil sie vom Dunkel der Nacht/ und nicht vom Feuer/ ihren Ursprung bekommen. Die Bilder aber/ so zur Seiten stehen/ sollen halb dunkel und halb feurig oder rötlich seyn. Welche aber von dem Feuer gesehen werden/ die müßen ganz rötlich/von der Flammen reflexion oder Gegenspielung/ auf einem braunen dunklen Feld/ erleuchtet stehen.
{und action oder Gebärden/ zu geben}. Was aber ihre [ndr.der Figuren] actiones, Gestalt und Stellung betrifft/ so können die/ so in der Nähe beym Feuer sind/ also vorgestellet werden/ daß sie die Mäntel vorschlagen/ die Hände vor das Angesicht halten/ oder solche abwenden/ als wann sie die Hitze des Feuers vermeiden wolten. Die aber in der Ferne stehen/ können ihre Augen mit den Händen reiben/ als ob ihnen der Rauch oder Flammen-Schein überlästig wäre. Andere mehr Stellungen/ wird dem vernünftigen Mahler die Natur und das Leben an die hand geben.

Quotation

{Process mit den Nacht Stucken/ bey Feuer und Liecht} Wann man eine Historie bey Nacht vorstellen will/ so mache man ein großes hell-brennendes Feuer/ dessen Schein weit um sich leuchte/ und sehe von denen umstehenden Sachen ab/ wie sie natürlich von der Feuerfarbe/ je näher je röhter/ participiren und sich gestalten. {Farbe des Feuers.} Dann das Feuer ist ganz rötlich/ als von Liecht-BleyGelb/ Weiß und Mennig gemischet: und also müßen auch die Dinge/ die dasselbe beleuchtet/ entbildet werden. Je weiter aber die Sachen von dem Feuer sich entfernen/ je mehr müßen sie von dessen Schein/ und nach und nach sich in schwarz- und finsterer Nacht-Farbe verlieren.
{Wie den Nacht-Figuren/ die Farbe} Die Figuren/ so vor dem Feuer stehen/ sollen dunkel und schwarz aus dessen Liechte herfür spielen: weil sie vom Dunkel der Nacht/ und nicht vom Feuer/ ihren Ursprung bekommen. Die Bilder aber/ so zur Seiten stehen/ sollen halb dunkel und halb feurig oder rötlich seyn. Welche aber von dem Feuer gesehen werden/ die müßen ganz rötlich/von der Flammen reflexion oder Gegenspielung/ auf einem braunen dunklen Feld/ erleuchtet stehen.
{und action oder Gebärden/ zu geben}. Was aber ihre [ndr.der Figuren] actiones, Gestalt und Stellung betrifft/ so können die/ so in der Nähe beym Feuer sind/ also vorgestellet werden/ daß sie die Mäntel vorschlagen/ die Hände vor das Angesicht halten/ oder solche abwenden/ als wann sie die Hitze des Feuers vermeiden wolten. Die aber in der Ferne stehen/ können ihre Augen mit den Händen reiben/ als ob ihnen der Rauch oder Flammen-Schein überlästig wäre. Andere mehr Stellungen/ wird dem vernünftigen Mahler die Natur und das Leben an die hand geben.

Quotation

Leonardo da Vinci had a wondrous Delicacy of Hand in finishing highly ; but Giorgion, and Correggio have especially been famous for a Fine, that is, a Light, Easy, and Delicate Pencil.

Quotation

Now the Painter expresseth two things with his colour : First the colour of the thing, whether it be artificial or natural, which he doth with the like colour, as the colour of a blew garment with artificial blew, or the green colour of a Tree with the like green : Secondly he expresseth the light of the Sun, or any other bright Body apt to lighten or manifest the colours, and because colour cannot be seen without light, being nothing else (as the Philosophers teach) but the extream Superficies of a dark untransparent Body lightned, I hold it expedient for him that will prove exquisite in the use thereof, to be most diligent in searching out the effects of light, when it enlightneth colour, which who so doth seriously consider, shall express all those effects with an admirable Grace ; […].
Now when the
Painter would imitate this blew thus lightned, he shall take his artificial blew colour, counterfeiting therewith the blew of the garment, but when he would express the light, wherewith the blew seems clearer, he must mix so much white with his blew, as he findeth light in that part of the garment, where the light striketh with greater force, considering afterwards the other part of the garment, where there is not so much light, and shall mingle less white with his blew proportionably, and so shall he proceed with the like discretion in all the other parts : and where the light falleth not so vehemently, but only by reflexion there he shall mix so much shadow with his blew, as shall seem sufficient to represent that light, loosing it self as it were by degrees, provided alwayes, that where the light is less darkned, there he place his shadow,
In which judicious expressing of the effects of light together with the
colours, Raphael Urbine, Leonard Vincent, Antonius de Coreggio and Titian were most admirable, handling them with so great discretion and judgement, that their Pictures seemed rather natural, then artificial ; the reason whereof the vulgar Eye cannot conceive, notwithstanding these excellent